Police advice to wear cycle helmets

This sub-forum all discussions about this "lively" subject. All topics that are substantially about helmets will be moved here, if not placed here correctly in the first place.
Steady rider
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Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Steady rider » 7 Oct 2017, 7:03pm

A local Parish/Town News Release from the crime prevention group included some advice for cyclists, it says;
" Always wear a helmet, as it may help to prevent serious head injuries, make sure it fits you and conforms to current British Standards. "


https://www.westyorkshire.police.uk/cyc ... d-security added a link to one police force.

The advice is understandable in the hope they may save injury. A selection of information, listed below shows why advice to wear a cycle helmets is questionable and if given, should be with a suitable warning that they may not improve overall safety.

Page references to specific parts of the following report are provided;
'Weaknesses with a meta-analysis approach to assessing cycle helmets'. Feb 2017
http://worldtransportjournal.com/wp-con ... eb-opt.pdf

pages 28/29 refers to;
A)
In New Zealand, from 1989 to 2011, average time spent cycling (on roads and footpaths) fell by 79% for children aged 5-12 (from 28 to 6 minutes per person per week) and 81% for 13-17 year olds (52 to 10 mins/person/week).
Adult cycling declined from 8 to 5 minutes/person/week then trended back up to 8 minutes. Graphs of cycle use over time provide strong evidence that the requirement to wear a helmet discouraged cycling. The reductions in cycling were accompanied by increased injury rates. Between 1989 and 2012, fatal or serious injuries per million hours of cycling increased by 86% for children (from 49 to 91), 181% for teenagers (from 18 to 51) and 64% for adults (from 23 to 38).[i]

page 29 refers to;
B)
Robinson 1996 also refers to the incidence of hitting their head/helmet in a cycling accident was "significantly higher for helmet wearers (8/40 vs 13/476, i.e. 20% vs 2.7%, p 0.00001)". A bare head width of approximately 150mm may avoid contact compared to a helmeted head at approximately 200mm width. Helmet wearers often report hitting their helmets and the 7 fold increase may have long term effects that may not show up in a meta–analysis.

page 29 refers to;
C)
Erke and Elvik 2007[i] examined research from Australia and New Zealand and stated: "There is evidence of increased accident risk per cycling-km for cyclists wearing a helmet. In Australia and New Zealand, the increase is estimated to be around 14 per cent." The findings were based on six reports, four from when legislation was in place.

page 29 refers to;
D)
A recent report detailed that cyclists wearing helmets had more than twice the odds of suffering an injury than cyclists not wearing helmets, (104) with an OR value 2.81, 95% CL =1.14, 6.94.

104 Porter AK, Salvo D, Kohl HW, Correlates of Helmet Use Among Recreation and Transportation Bicyclists, AJPM 2016. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27866599

The above information provides evidence that helmet wearers may incur a higher accident rate, per cycling kilometre or in comparison to non-wearers or as helmet use increased in proportion.

E)
Another evaluation, published by the New Zealand Medical Journal, detailed;

Injury data11 for 2006–09 compared to 1998/90 shows an average reduction of approximately 18.5% (858/1052), compared to cycling reducing by 38.5% (24/39 million hours). The approximate risk per million hours cycling therefore increased from 27 to 35.7 or by 32%.

Refer to https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-th ... cle-clarke

F)
A 2015 report, ‘Overestimation of the effectiveness of the bicycle helmet by the use of odds ratios’ details;
Three cases could be found in the literature with sufficient data to assess both risk ratios and odds ratios: the Netherlands, Victoria (Australia) and Seattle (U.S.A). In all three cases, the problem of overestimation of the effectiveness of the helmet by using odds ratios did occur. The effect ranges from small (+ 8 % ) to extremely large ( > + 400 %). Contrary to the original claim of these studies, in two out of three cases the risk of getting a head injury proved not to be lower for helmeted cyclists. Moreover, in all three cases the risk of getting a non-head injury proved to be higher for cyclists with a helmet.
Refer;
http://www.fietsberaad.nl/?lang=nl&repo ... dds+ratios

G)
Page 20 of ‘Evaluation of Australia's bicycle helmet laws, The Sports Science Summit, O2 venue London UK http://www.cycle-helmets.com/au-assessment-2015.pdf Presented 14 January 2015, details;
4) Robinson's 1996 report provided injury data for children. In Victoria, the equivalent number of injuries for pre law levels of number of cyclists increased by 15% from 1990 to 1992. Robinson provides data in Table 2 for children in NSW. The equivalent number of injuries increased from 1310 (384 head + 926 other injuries) pre law in 1991 to 2083 (488 head + 1595 other injuries) in 1993. The relative injury rate increased by 59% from 1310 to 2083. The relative increase in 'other' injuries of 72% and 27% for 'head' raises serious concerns. The proportion of head injuries decreased from 29.3% to 23.4% and would give the impression of a benefit if viewed in isolation.

H)
The report, ‘The Case against bicycle helmets and legislation’, Velo City Confernece paper, Munich, 2007.
http://www.ta.org.br/site/Banco/7manuai ... helmet.pdf
Details some of the potential positive and potential negative aspects of wearing a helmet, two potential benefits are listed compared with 13 potential disadvantages. A number of reports are listed A1 to A14 indicating a higher accident rate associated with wearing helmets.

Cost of accidents for helmet wearers v non-wearers
One report provided hospital costs associated with bicyclists and motorcyclists, who had incurred head injuries and been admitted. On average for bicyclists the medium costs for helmeted were $6500 v $5600 for non-helmeted.
For motorcyclists the medium costs for helmeted were $7700 v $11400 for non-helmeted.
Bicyclists not wearing helmets had a lower cost than those helmeted.
Refer to; https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... ntre_study

‘The effectiveness of helmets in reducing head injuries and hospital treatment costs: A multicentre study’ Dinh et al, MJA, 6 May, 2013

Even if helmet use reduces the proportion of head injuries, net overall safety in terms of overall accidents is reduced according to know research based on per km travelled when helmeted. So there is no sound safety reason to advise that helmets should be worn for normal cycling.

The UK's National Children's Bureau (NCB) provided a detailed review in 2005 stating "the case for helmets is far from sound", "the benefits of helmets need further investigation before even a policy supporting promotion can be unequivocally supported" and "the case has not yet been convincingly made for compulsory use or promotion of cycle helmets".

Refer;
Cycle helmets: An overview of the evidence
http://www.ctc.org.uk/sites/default/fil ... ncebrf.pdf

The Cyclist Touring Club (Cycling UK national cycling charity) states that "Individuals should be free to make their own decisions about whether or not to wear helmets, with parents making these decisions in the case of younger children. Their decisions should be informed by clear information about the uncertainties over the benefits or otherwise of helmets. ' and "it is therefore entirely possible that helmet wearing might have a net disbenefit even in safety terms (a point also suggested by some of the empirical evidence), not to mention the health and other disbenefits identified above".

Cycling UK state;
“Cycling UK is opposed to both cycle helmet laws and to helmet promotion campaigns because these are almost certainly detrimental to public health. Evidence shows that the health benefits of cycling are so much greater than the relatively low risks involved, that even if these measures caused only a very small reduction in cycle use, this would still almost certainly mean far more lives being lost through physical inactivity than helmets could possibly save, however effective”.
and
“In any case, there are serious doubts about the effectiveness of helmets. They are, and can only be, designed to withstand minor knocks and falls, not serious traffic collisions. Some evidence suggests they may in fact increase the risk of cyclists having falls or collisions in the first place, or suffering neck injuries.”

Cycle helmets: An overview of the evidence
http://www.ctc.org.uk/sites/default/fil ... ncebrf.pdf accessed 27.11.2014

In the UK, some 8,000 years of average cycling will produce one clinically severe head injury*. For the average person cycling for 60 years, this relates to one severe head injury per 133 lifetimes of cycling, less than 1% risk per average lifetime. This overall small relative risk is much lower than the risk of having extra accidents due to helmet use.

* Wardlaw MJ. Three lessons for a better cycling future. BMJ : British Medical Journal. 2000;321(7276):1582-1585.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1119262/

The overall evidence is not sufficiently sound to justify advising cyclists to wear cycle helmets for normal cycling. A suitable warning should be given that they may not improve overall safety.
Last edited by Steady rider on 7 Oct 2017, 8:42pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Mick F
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2017, 8:10pm

Why is the argument to wear a helmet so short, succinct, and (supposedly) common sense ............................. but the argument against wearing a helmet always so longwinded complicated?
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby mjr » 7 Oct 2017, 8:17pm

Because helmet fanatics use alternative facts which are usually shorter and have no supporting evidence.
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Mick F
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2017, 8:22pm

So why not attack them using their own tactics?
We non-helmet wearers, need an argument that is short, succinct, and with (real) common sense.

Listing all the facts is boring and off-putting.
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby softlips » 7 Oct 2017, 8:24pm

I always wear one, working in A&E ive seen at least 15 people die or have major Brian injuries who may have been fine if wearing one. Now the bit that worries me about helmets is they may also allow you to survive injuries you'd rather have killed you outright. That said, I've yet to see anyone personally in this predicament.

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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2017, 8:34pm

Sorry, you've not convinced me despite your seeing at least 15 people.
How do you know that if those 15 people had not been wearing a helmet would have not hit their helmet?

Have you ever weighed your head?
Have you ever weighed your helmet?
i had an experiment some time back .......... if you search this forum you'll find my experiment of dunking my head in a bucket of water and measuring the volume. :lol:

I worked out, that my "head" would be 50% heavier and 50% bigger when wearing a helmet than when not.
Some might say that I was more likely to bang my head/helmet when wearing a helmet, then when not wearing one.

Have you considered this?
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Steady rider » 7 Oct 2017, 8:36pm

Anyone in A&E are probably at a disadvantage in terms of assessing helmets, they see injuries on a regular basis. They cannot assess overall risk/likely gains/likely disadvantages, they are seeing a one sided view of a multi sided problem.

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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby horizon » 7 Oct 2017, 8:45pm

softlips wrote:I always wear one, working in A&E ive seen at least 15 people die or have major Brian injuries who may have been fine if wearing one. Now the bit that worries me about helmets is they may also allow you to survive injuries you'd rather have killed you outright. That said, I've yet to see anyone personally in this predicament.


Apart from the Brian injury . . . :lol:

What percentage were killed?
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2017, 8:49pm

horizon wrote:What percentage were killed?

softlips wrote:I always wear one, working in A&E ...............

What about this graph?

Cyclists?
Way down the list, as low as pedestrians.

Why don't A&E campaign about car occupants wearing helmets?
helmet_causes copy.jpg
helmet_causes copy.jpg (16.67 KiB) Viewed 766 times
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby rmurphy195 » 7 Oct 2017, 8:53pm

Steady rider wrote:Anyone in A&E are probably at a disadvantage in terms of assessing helmets, they see injuries on a regular basis. They cannot assess overall risk/likely gains/likely disadvantages, they are seeing a one sided view of a multi sided problem.


You joke, surely? I must say Its a long time since I read anything so ridiculous.

They - and police and fire officers - also see the upset relatives of victims and quite rightly have a view that is not one sided, it is realistic. I will never, ever forget the face of the ambulance attendant that revisited my cubicle in casualty after i was knocked off my bike, and the sheer relief on her face on finding I was OK. Nor the glances to/from the bruise on my forehead and my damaged helmet, which gave me a damn site more protection than any statistic.
Last edited by rmurphy195 on 7 Oct 2017, 8:55pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2017, 8:55pm

............... so wear one all the time?
Especially in a car?
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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Cunobelin » 7 Oct 2017, 9:08pm

Mick F wrote:So why not attack them using their own tactics?
We non-helmet wearers, need an argument that is short, succinct, and with (real) common sense.

Listing all the facts is boring and off-putting.



Nice and simple....... given that pedestrian injuries outnumber cyclist head injuries by a large number - why are you not wearing one?

Every single fact they use can be turned around to question their lack of helmet

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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Cunobelin » 7 Oct 2017, 9:16pm

rmurphy195 wrote:
Steady rider wrote:Anyone in A&E are probably at a disadvantage in terms of assessing helmets, they see injuries on a regular basis. They cannot assess overall risk/likely gains/likely disadvantages, they are seeing a one sided view of a multi sided problem.


You joke, surely? I must say Its a long time since I read anything so ridiculous.

They - and police and fire officers - also see the upset relatives of victims and quite rightly have a view that is not one sided, it is realistic. I will never, ever forget the face of the ambulance attendant that revisited my cubicle in casualty after i was knocked off my bike, and the sheer relief on her face on finding I was OK. Nor the glances to/from the bruise on my forehead and my damaged helmet, which gave me a damn site more protection than any statistic.



The problem is that the majority of head injuries they will see will NOT be cyclists

They will be simple falls, and assaults the biggest single factor being alcohol

Cyclist head injuries are a small fraction

Ar the relatives of the pedestrian who has struck their head in a simple fall, or the guy hit in the pub any less upset, are the injuries somehow less painful or traumatic?

Would the truly "realistic view" not be to be questioning why these individuals were not wearing a helmet that could have saved them from that trauma?

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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Cunobelin » 7 Oct 2017, 9:28pm

horizon wrote:
softlips wrote:I always wear one, working in A&E ive seen at least 15 people die or have major Brian injuries who may have been fine if wearing one. Now the bit that worries me about helmets is they may also allow you to survive injuries you'd rather have killed you outright. That said, I've yet to see anyone personally in this predicament.


Apart from the Brian injury . . . :lol:

What percentage were killed?



Again raises an important question....


How many pedestrian, assault, or vehicle occupants have been seen who may have been fine if they had been wearing a helmet..... why is no-one doing anything about the trauma, pain and suffering of these individuals, or is is simply acceptable?

Secondly the numbers killed reflect the same question
There was an interesting table from Meier Hillman that showed breakdown of fatalities due to head injuries:

Pedestrians - 31%
Cyclists - 8.5%
2-wheel motor riders - 11.9%
Vehicle drivers - 24.9%
Vehicle passengers - 15.6%

With over three times as many pedestrians dying as cyclists, and almost 5 times as many vehicle users dying from head injuries, it once again begs the question why no-one is interested in saving the lives of the 91.5% of victims, but are almost fanatical about saving the lives of the 8.5%

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Re: Police advice to wear cycle helmets

Postby Wanlock Dod » 7 Oct 2017, 9:58pm

softlips wrote:I always wear one, working in A&E

Given that drunkards seem to be the bread and butter of A&E departments, and that alcohol is at least implicated a very large proportion of head injuries this seems like a very sound idea. I would definitely wear a helmet if I went to an A&E.