A recommended book for every Cyclist

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toomsie
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A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby toomsie » 16 Apr 2015, 3:02pm

I have to recommend this book. Cyclecraft. After looking on the internet( mainly Youtube ) I have failed to find any significant advice for good cycling, especially for the UK. Youtube link is worth watching. https://www.youtube.com/user/sillycyclists
Before the book I was always be a careful cyclist. I use lights in the daytime including one on the helmet. I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.

What I like about this book is it give a lot of in-depth information about different kinds of junction on the road including how to approach them. The main thing that I have learned is to cycle too close to carb. On a quiet road, I will drive in the primary position on the road. If a car comes up behind me, I will let him pass when it is safe, ‘not to soon and not to late’. No driver has got annoyed or in patient. I actually feel much safer on the road and get to my destination much quicker also.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_ ... cyclecraft

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Si
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Si » 16 Apr 2015, 4:20pm

The main thing that I have learned is to cycle too close to carb.


Think you might be missing a 'not' in there?
And it looks like your auto-spell corrector is playing silly billies with 'kerb' :wink:


Yep, of the publications available it's the one that I've tended to point people towards. Although, recently talking to a cycle training organisation and they were suggesting that the latest edition is starting to veer away from National Standards - thus I must get around to reading a new one to see what the differences are.

rmurphy195
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby rmurphy195 » 16 Apr 2015, 4:38pm

toomsie wrote: I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.


DON'T - they work, really. I found a few weeks ago (not anecdotal, not hearsay, have the bruises). And the vehicle that drove into me wasn't overtaking.
Brompton, Condor Heritage, creaky joints and thinning white (formerly grey) hair
""You know you're getting old when it's easier to ride a bike than to get on and off it" - quote from observant jogger !

Bicycler
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Bicycler » 16 Apr 2015, 4:43pm

anecdotal /ˌanɪkˈdəʊtl/
adjective
(of an account) not necessarily true or reliable, because based on personal accounts rather than facts or research

Steady rider
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Steady rider » 16 Apr 2015, 8:19pm

Cyclists ride at various speeds and have varying ability to deal with road situations. Tailoring the way to cycle v road situation v ability can be overcome with good cycle infrastructure and training to a degree. Possibly best to bear in mind what is recommended and use as it suits. Research indicates that helmets may provide some protection and at the same time may increase the accident risk. The road surfaces were probably better for cycling in the 1960s or 70s but standards have fallen.

Mark1978
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Mark1978 » 16 Apr 2015, 9:02pm

Indeed. While I may have little issue with taking primary at a junction and hauling ass when the lights turn green. Not everyone has speed - either because of fitness or because of their bike - to be able to do that.

MartinC
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby MartinC » 17 Apr 2015, 8:31am

rmurphy195 wrote:
toomsie wrote: I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.


DON'T - they work, really. I found a few weeks ago (not anecdotal, not hearsay, have the bruises). And the vehicle that drove into me wasn't overtaking.


:D Are you saying that Toomsie is right and that wearing the helmet made the car hit you? I think we need more evidence than just your anecdote.

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mjr
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby mjr » 17 Apr 2015, 9:00am

Mark1978 wrote:Indeed. While I may have little issue with taking primary at a junction and hauling ass when the lights turn green. Not everyone has speed - either because of fitness or because of their bike - to be able to do that.

I'm pretty sure cyclecraft doesn't require one to haul ass. I know it's an unpleasant conflict but you can stay in primary until it's safe to move and the overwhelming majority of drivers will deal with it well.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
All the above is CC-By-SA and no other implied copyright license to Cycle magazine.

Mark1978
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Mark1978 » 17 Apr 2015, 9:27am

But that comes back to confidence. Regardless of the patience or otherwise of the drivers behind you feel under pressure to move. Slower riders will feel pressured to get out of the way sooner so move out of primary when maintaining it would be safer.

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pjclinch
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby pjclinch » 17 Apr 2015, 10:26am

mjr wrote:
Mark1978 wrote:Indeed. While I may have little issue with taking primary at a junction and hauling ass when the lights turn green. Not everyone has speed - either because of fitness or because of their bike - to be able to do that.

I'm pretty sure cyclecraft doesn't require one to haul ass. I know it's an unpleasant conflict but you can stay in primary until it's safe to move and the overwhelming majority of drivers will deal with it well.


I don't have a copy to hand, and haven't really delved in to my new edition much, but IIRC it does suggest that acceleration is a handy thing to have at times.

And if it doesn't say that, I do. You don't need it to survive, but the reality on the ground is you're better off if you can turn up the pace when you're sharing with a lot of impatient drivers.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

Thermostat9
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Thermostat9 » 17 Apr 2015, 10:31am

toomsie wrote: I use lights in the daytime

How is that supposed to help?

Phil Fouracre
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Phil Fouracre » 17 Apr 2015, 7:41pm

No idea! Used them riding a GSX 1100 years ago, made no difference to drivers responses.
Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity

rmurphy195
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby rmurphy195 » 18 Apr 2015, 12:04pm

MartinC wrote:
rmurphy195 wrote:
toomsie wrote: I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.


DON'T - they work, really. I found a few weeks ago (not anecdotal, not hearsay, have the bruises). And the vehicle that drove into me wasn't overtaking.


:D Are you saying that Toomsie is right and that wearing the helmet made the car hit you? I think we need more evidence than just your anecdote.

Nope, I'm saying that in my case the vehicle was carrying out a manouvre other than overtaking, of which there are many. I think. Since he "didn't see" me :roll: , the presence or non presence of my helmet didn't matter to him, but it sure made a difference to me! (and my wife, who had an unpleasant phone call at lunchtime on Mothers Day and maybe would have had a more unpleasant one) Maybe if I wasn't wearing the helmet (nor the yellow gloves and orange jacket) perhaps he would have seen me though. But then again after I hit the ground maybe someone else would have "Not Seen" me without the bright clothing and I would have been squashed. Hmmm. What do I do now I wonder ....

:idea: Gotit - cycle at night on a matt black bike dressed all in black, wearing an overbright lamp on my head to dazzle oncoming drivers and reduce their chances of seeing me - that's it! I wondered why people do this, now I know!
Brompton, Condor Heritage, creaky joints and thinning white (formerly grey) hair
""You know you're getting old when it's easier to ride a bike than to get on and off it" - quote from observant jogger !

Bicycler
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Bicycler » 18 Apr 2015, 11:35pm

Whilst I understand what Pete, Mark et al are saying that some people lack the confidence to be assertive in positioning and that vehicular cycling is easier if one is speedy, is there anything wrong with recommending that people read the book and understand the principles? Reading and understanding the ideas behind Cyclecraft may enhance somebody's confidence and get them thinking more about how they cycle. If it is not for them then nothing is lost so there is no harm in recommending the book. For every person who has read Cyclecraft and chooses to ride everywhere in the gutter or on pavements there are many, many more who ride in the gutter or pavement because it is 'obviously safer' and that view has never been questioned.

rmurphy195
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby rmurphy195 » 19 Apr 2015, 7:46pm

Bicycler wrote:Whilst I understand what Pete, Mark et al are saying that some people lack the confidence to be assertive in positioning and that vehicular cycling is easier if one is speedy, is there anything wrong with recommending that people read the book and understand the principles? Reading and understanding the ideas behind Cyclecraft may enhance somebody's confidence and get them thinking more about how they cycle. If it is not for them then nothing is lost so there is no harm in recommending the book. For every person who has read Cyclecraft and chooses to ride everywhere in the gutter or on pavements there are many, many more who ride in the gutter or pavement because it is 'obviously safer' and that view has never been questioned.


Totally agree. Many years ago I read the excellent publication "Motorcycle Roadcraft", which I think is in a similar vein, and much of what I read (and re-read) stuck and held me in good stead during my (motorised) biking days.
Brompton, Condor Heritage, creaky joints and thinning white (formerly grey) hair
""You know you're getting old when it's easier to ride a bike than to get on and off it" - quote from observant jogger !