A recommended book for every Cyclist

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nez
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby nez » 19 Apr 2015, 7:52pm

What I can't figure out is why so few cyclists have a mirror on the bike. I'm Very keen on knowing what people are doing behind me. And there are specific circs - turning right on a steep hill for example - where using one will enable you to time a move in a way that would be tricky with just glances over the shoulder. You need both.

Vorpal
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Vorpal » 19 Apr 2015, 8:23pm

pjclinch wrote:
mjr wrote:
Mark1978 wrote:Indeed. While I may have little issue with taking primary at a junction and hauling ass when the lights turn green. Not everyone has speed - either because of fitness or because of their bike - to be able to do that.

I'm pretty sure cyclecraft doesn't require one to haul ass. I know it's an unpleasant conflict but you can stay in primary until it's safe to move and the overwhelming majority of drivers will deal with it well.


I don't have a copy to hand, and haven't really delved in to my new edition much, but IIRC it does suggest that acceleration is a handy thing to have at times.

And if it doesn't say that, I do. You don't need it to survive, but the reality on the ground is you're better off if you can turn up the pace when you're sharing with a lot of impatient drivers.

Pete.

It depends on circumstance and conditions doesn't it? Most of the time, it makes no difference whatsoever whether I am a 6-8 mph cyclist or an 18 - 20 mph cyclist; whether I can go hell bent for leather, or only at a slightly faster pootle. Some junctions are much easier to do if one can accelerate quickly, and some junctions are difficult or impossible to get across if one cannot accelerate quickly. A combination of fast motor traffic and poor visibility can make it difficult to get across in a car, let alone a bicycle. In those circumstances, if I can't accelerate quickly (hauling kids, a load of shopping, stuff for the tip, etc.) I take another route, or use a pedestrian crossing or something.

Yes, Cyclecraft does say that acceleration can be used to avoid or get out of trouble, especially on a roundabout. However, vehicular cycling doesn't require being fast and fit. It can be merely useful in some circumstances. And if it's not possible for whatever reason, it's normally possible to make other choices. It's not ideal, but it is the nature of cycling in the UK.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

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Cunobelin
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Cunobelin » 19 Apr 2015, 9:15pm

rmurphy195 wrote:
toomsie wrote: I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.


DON'T - they work, really. I found a few weeks ago (not anecdotal, not hearsay, have the bruises). And the vehicle that drove into me wasn't overtaking.


I was walking down the stairs with a laundry basket and hit my head when I missed the bottom step

I now have a cut on my head..... again not anecdotal

Is this proof that helmets should be worn whilst doing laundry?

nez
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby nez » 19 Apr 2015, 9:50pm

Do you miss the bottom step often?

Bicycler
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Bicycler » 19 Apr 2015, 10:40pm

Cunobelin wrote:
rmurphy195 wrote:
toomsie wrote: I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.


DON'T - they work, really. I found a few weeks ago (not anecdotal, not hearsay, have the bruises). And the vehicle that drove into me wasn't overtaking.


I was walking down the stairs with a laundry basket and hit my head when I missed the bottom step

I now have a cut on my head..... again not anecdotal

Is this proof that helmets should be worn whilst doing laundry?

Don't be silly. It is clear evidence that thin air works as a life saving device :wink:

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mjr
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby mjr » 20 Apr 2015, 11:57am

nez dans le guidon wrote:What I can't figure out is why so few cyclists have a mirror on the bike.

All mirrors suck on most upright bikes. They either don't stick out far enough to enable you to see behind without contorting yourself or they stick out so far that they are another thing that gets clipped by passing barriers/vehicles and vibrate so much it's hard to see in them.

(It seems easier to put a mirror in a place on a recumbent so that it's nearly inside the usual width but still allows vision behind.)
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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nez
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby nez » 20 Apr 2015, 12:14pm

I have one on my super galaxy and it works fine. I don't rely on it, I turn my head as much as anyone, but it's good for a glance to see what people are up to behind. On flat bar books I think it would be good for a view of your elbows - like most motorcycle mirrors. But on a drop bar bike it works fine.

nez
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby nez » 20 Apr 2015, 12:14pm

Bikes not books. Grr

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pjclinch
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby pjclinch » 20 Apr 2015, 12:22pm

Bicycler wrote:Whilst I understand what Pete, Mark et al are saying that some people lack the confidence to be assertive in positioning and that vehicular cycling is easier if one is speedy, is there anything wrong with recommending that people read the book and understand the principles?


Absolutely nothing wrong with reading it. Even if there's stuff you disagree with, Franklin writes with plenty of lucid reasoning so you can see where he's coming from, and often there'll be minor tweaks to not-remotely-extreme situations where you think, "oh, that's a good idea!"

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

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mjr
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby mjr » 20 Apr 2015, 12:56pm

nez dans le guidon wrote:I have one on my super galaxy and it works fine. I don't rely on it, I turn my head as much as anyone, but it's good for a glance to see what people are up to behind. On flat bar books I think it would be good for a view of your elbows - like most motorcycle mirrors. But on a drop bar bike it works fine.

True, on a drop bar, you maybe can hang a mirror like Zefal Spy below the end and get a decent view without it being full of arm. Currently my bikes have North Roads, Montmartres and flat/straight bars, though.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
All the above is CC-By-SA and no other implied copyright license to Cycle magazine.

toomsie
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby toomsie » 20 Apr 2015, 2:01pm

Bicycler wrote:Whilst I understand what Pete, Mark et al are saying that some people lack the confidence to be assertive in positioning and that vehicular cycling is easier if one is speedy.


I don't consider myself that confidence as such. I am at least not a lippy person. Its much easier to do correct cycling when a book tells you what to do and you have some experience practicing it. I guess that speed does help though: a road that was once a hazard is no longer one because I stay in the primary position until the road widens out.

Bicycler
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Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

Postby Bicycler » 20 Apr 2015, 2:29pm

Yeah, I didn't mean that people need to be overly self confident. As you say, understanding the book allows you to have confidence in your actions, knowing that you are doing the correct thing. One problem we have to deal with is that we are a small proportion of all road users. Others do not necessarily understand our needs or best cycling practice which means that occasionally we find ourselves cycling in a way which drivers (even those we know) don't approve of and misinterpret as selfishness or arrogance. Most of us are neither selfish nor arrogant so we need to trust our own judgement in making our own decisions. Cyclecraft helps us improve this decision making process and thus our confidence in making the correct decisions. If we start to doubt our own decisions we start to regress to the drivers mindset and feel that we are an obstruction or hindrance and start heading ever closer to the kerb to minimise this.