Pictures of your tents.

Specifically for cycle touring subjects & questions
PT1029
Posts: 1122
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 9:20pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by PT1029 »

We usually pack our Nallo 3 GT as one (inner/outer/footprint), as it makes pitching/taking down easy.
If it is raining heavily, I now pack the inner separately from the outer/footprint.
Last year I was hoping for heaving rain while taking the tent down so I could test packing the tent as 1 when it was wet. My wish was granted (rain weather warning that day). When we put the tent up at the end of the day, I had to sponge out the inner (puddles) and let it air before we could put anything in the tent.
With my old Saunders Space Packer Plus, I always packed the inner/outer in separate bags, putting the outer below the inner in a front pannier. That way the inner was always dry, regarless of how wet the outer was, and regardless of how big the water puddle was at the bottom of the pannier.
iandusud
Posts: 1070
Joined: 26 Mar 2018, 1:35pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by iandusud »

bikepacker wrote: 25 Aug 2021, 4:09pm On all the tunnel tents I have used (Hilleberg, Helsport, Coleman and Vango) I leave the footprint attached to the tent and roll them up as one. Makes it easier and quicker to pitch especially when moving on each day. If you do this you may need a larger tent bag but there are many cheap ones to be had.
Our tent will easily go in its bag with the footprint. I just prefer if possible to pack a dry tent. :)
bikepacker
Posts: 2133
Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 7:08pm
Location: Worcestershire
Contact:

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by bikepacker »

iandusud wrote: 26 Aug 2021, 7:51am
bikepacker wrote: 25 Aug 2021, 4:09pm On all the tunnel tents I have used (Hilleberg, Helsport, Coleman and Vango) I leave the footprint attached to the tent and roll them up as one. Makes it easier and quicker to pitch especially when moving on each day. If you do this you may need a larger tent bag but there are many cheap ones to be had.
Our tent will easily go in its bag with the footprint. I just prefer if possible to pack a dry tent. :)
As PT1029 says just take the inner down if packing up a wet tent keeping that dry is the essential thing. By separating tent from footprint and leaving the inner in place is more likely to give a wet inner tent.
There is your way. There is my way. But there is no "the way".
iandusud
Posts: 1070
Joined: 26 Mar 2018, 1:35pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by iandusud »

bikepacker wrote: 26 Aug 2021, 3:46pm
iandusud wrote: 26 Aug 2021, 7:51am
bikepacker wrote: 25 Aug 2021, 4:09pm On all the tunnel tents I have used (Hilleberg, Helsport, Coleman and Vango) I leave the footprint attached to the tent and roll them up as one. Makes it easier and quicker to pitch especially when moving on each day. If you do this you may need a larger tent bag but there are many cheap ones to be had.
Our tent will easily go in its bag with the footprint. I just prefer if possible to pack a dry tent. :)
As PT1029 says just take the inner down if packing up a wet tent keeping that dry is the essential thing. By separating tent from footprint and leaving the inner in place is more likely to give a wet inner tent.
Fair comment if packing up a wet tent.
User avatar
horizon
Posts: 10636
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by horizon »

pjclinch wrote: 25 Aug 2021, 10:03am
horizon wrote: 23 Aug 2021, 10:46pm
Even a two man tent in this configuration will be a game changer. .
You don't need a formally extended porch for this, just a decent sized porch (or porches). A Spacepacker has plenty of porch space for all of the above, and Saunders' fly-first designs generally did too.
I've been using my Saunders Fellpacker recently and yes, it has a nice porch, adequate for most purposes. But we'll have to agree to differ on whether an extension (as oppposed to a porch) is a real bonus or not. I think an extension is a vast improvement but I agree it doesn't make other tents useless.
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher
User avatar
TimeTraveller
Posts: 120
Joined: 7 Mar 2019, 8:49pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by TimeTraveller »

Both my old tents together, vango zenith 200 and wild country zephyros 1 (still own this)... Me an my son a few winters ago..
snow.JPG
Looking forwards to the end of Ninja mode.....
User avatar
pjclinch
Posts: 4255
Joined: 29 Oct 2007, 2:32pm
Location: Dundee, Scotland
Contact:

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by pjclinch »

horizon wrote: 27 Aug 2021, 7:59pm
pjclinch wrote: 25 Aug 2021, 10:03am
horizon wrote: 23 Aug 2021, 10:46pm
Even a two man tent in this configuration will be a game changer. .
You don't need a formally extended porch for this, just a decent sized porch (or porches). A Spacepacker has plenty of porch space for all of the above, and Saunders' fly-first designs generally did too.
I've been using my Saunders Fellpacker recently and yes, it has a nice porch, adequate for most purposes. But we'll have to agree to differ on whether an extension (as oppposed to a porch) is a real bonus or not. I think an extension is a vast improvement but I agree it doesn't make other tents useless.
IIRC the Fellpacker was along the same lines as the JetPacker, and that was really trimmed towards light weight rather than spacious porch area. It was rather remiss of me to overlook those in my comment, but I was thinking of the transverse designs like the SpacePacker, Basecamp and Galaxy when I made it.

Being transverse designs the porches are as wide as the sleeping space is long. A Spacepacker has far more space in one of its porches than a Jetpacker has, and the Spacepeacker has two of them. The Galaxy has porch space equal to the entire ground area of a complete Spacepeacker: with that kind of space you really don't need an extension.

The Hille Kaitum has an extended porch version but for a lot of uses I think you're getting too much of a good thing, and paying for it with extra weight, bulk and tent-size (the standard Kaitum is a big tent, the GT is huge!)

A Kaitum and a Nallo GT are about the same size overall, the difference is the Kaitum has the porch space split to each end so each one has a sloping end, while both ends of the inner are vertical. So while porch and inner area is about the same in each, in the Nallo GT you get more porch volume and in the Kaitum you get more inner volume, as here...
Image
Image

I prefer more cat-swinging space for me than my gear, and there's still loads of space for cooking/gear/getting in and out, plus the convenience of a door and storage each.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...
Jdsk
Posts: 10560
Joined: 5 Mar 2019, 5:42pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by Jdsk »

pjclinch wrote: 30 Aug 2021, 11:49amIIRC the Fellpacker was along the same lines as the JetPacker, and that was really trimmed towards light weight rather than spacious porch area. It was rather remiss of me to overlook those in my comment, but I was thinking of the transverse designs like the SpacePacker, Basecamp and Galaxy when I made it.

Being transverse designs the porches are as wide as the sleeping space is long. A Spacepacker has far more space in one of its porches than a Jetpacker has, and the Spacepeacker has two of them. The Galaxy has porch space equal to the entire ground area of a complete Spacepeacker: with that kind of space you really don't need an extension.
Yes.

We use a BasePacker (two people, transverse ridge) for cycle touring. The two full-length porches are excellent for storage under cover and for access to what's stored there. And for getting out without disturbing your tentmate.

Jonathan
Slowroad
Posts: 856
Joined: 28 Jun 2008, 9:58pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by Slowroad »

Used my new Wild Country Zephyros Compact 1 for 9 moving-on days in North Wales.
Downsides - still a faff to put up and to get taut. The door if clipped back hangs down a bit as in the photos, but rather better if pulled loosely back over the tent with a bungee. The footprint, unlike previous ones I've had for other tents, doesn't reach to the outer tent most of the way round, reducing the storage usefulness of the spaces round the inner. I brought some pieces of very lightweight tarp to use instead. More bulky than I expected and the compact shape applies to the bag in comes in too - great for a rucksack but not for my panniers, so I re-packaged it to be longer and flatter.
Upsides - I liked being able to lie inside and still watch the campsite! It isn't clautrophobic and there was plenty of room in the inner (but I'm only 5'2" and not chubby!) There is enough space to store cooking stuff and panniers, etc., in the long narrow porch. It's under 2 kilos, and with the Cycling UK discount was under £150.
I think it's an OK budget fairweather tent - not sure about in the rain. I'm thinking about some sort of door hack... someone here has had the same idea http://grejtest.blogspot.com/2013/08/te ... ros-1.html
Attachments
DSCF0396tent.JPG
DSCF0395tent.JPG
“My two favourite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: riding a bike to the library.”
― Peter Golkin
User avatar
andrew_s
Posts: 5413
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 9:29pm
Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by andrew_s »

Slowroad wrote: 14 Sep 2021, 4:07pmThe door if clipped back hangs down a bit as in the photos, but rather better if pulled loosely back over the tent with a bungee
I'm thinking about some sort of door hack
Suggestion: https://speedsterstoves.co.uk/other-pro ... gnets.html
marketability
Posts: 1
Joined: 20 Aug 2021, 9:15pm

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by marketability »

Image
Short overnight trip up the Lee valley
Off around Cornwall coast for the next few days


I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my wobbly bog brush using hovercraft full of eels
User avatar
NATURAL ANKLING
Posts: 13002
Joined: 24 Oct 2012, 10:43pm
Location: English Riviera

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by NATURAL ANKLING »

Hi,
Oh, good luck with the Cornwall coast :)
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
You'll Still Find Me At The Top Of A Hill
Please forgive the poor Grammar I blame it on my mobile and phat thinkers.
User avatar
Sweep
Posts: 7123
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 4:57pm
Location: London

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by Sweep »

marketability wrote: 17 Sep 2021, 5:15pm Image
Short overnight trip up the Lee valley
Off around Cornwall coast for the next few days


I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my wobbly bog brush using hovercraft full of eels
appears to be on a lawn?
Sweep
Slowroad
Posts: 856
Joined: 28 Jun 2008, 9:58pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by Slowroad »

Slowroad wrote: ↑14 Sep 2021, 4:07pm
The door if clipped back hangs down a bit as in the photos, but rather better if pulled loosely back over the tent with a bungee
I'm thinking about some sort of door hack

Suggestion: https://speedsterstoves.co.uk/other-pro ... gnets.html
Strange but very useful looking objects! Would hold back the tent flap without wearing the fabric - and all sorts of applications, I'm sure... :-)
“My two favourite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: riding a bike to the library.”
― Peter Golkin
User avatar
Sweep
Posts: 7123
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 4:57pm
Location: London

Re: Pictures of your tents.

Post by Sweep »

Slowroad wrote: 19 Sep 2021, 9:01pm
Slowroad wrote: ↑14 Sep 2021, 4:07pm
The door if clipped back hangs down a bit as in the photos, but rather better if pulled loosely back over the tent with a bungee
I'm thinking about some sort of door hack

Suggestion: https://speedsterstoves.co.uk/other-pro ... gnets.html
Strange but very useful looking objects! Would hold back the tent flap without wearing the fabric - and all sorts of applications, I'm sure... :-)
A ball bungee might possibly also be useful.
ball.png
I always carry a few on tour - innumerable uses - helping to string washing lines, help with tarps, help hold bikes on trains, immobilise (not high security of course) bikes/stop them rolling.
Sweep
Post Reply