To cook or not to cook?

Specifically for cycle touring subjects & questions
willem jongman
Posts: 2076
Joined: 7 Jan 2008, 4:16pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby willem jongman » 1 Jan 2017, 3:28pm

I agree that gas is very convenient, and I do like the Trangia gas stove. However, I am afraid I am not as optimistic about getting cannisters in these three countries. I am Dutch, and ride a lot in Germany (and have also toured in Denmark). First, Camping Gaz cannisters with valves are very rare here, the type with the Lindall valve is more common. Even those, however, are primarily found in outdoor stores. Some campsites will have them, but many not (in fact, these days many campsites do not even have a shop anymore). The only common cannister type is the (more dangerous) puncture type. Stoves for those are bulkier and heavier, however, and so are adapters. If you want to use gas cannisters, you really have to take at least one spare.
By and large I prefer hassle free touring. Hence my preference for meths as a fuel that you can buy in almost any supermarket, and hence also my preference for the Etrex 30 gps, that will last some 4-5 days in one set of (quality) AA rechargeables. If I take some spares, I do not even need to take a charger, let alone ask campsite owners to charge my batteries. Less hassle is more fun, at least for me.

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14562
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Leafy suburbia

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 1 Jan 2017, 4:28pm

bohrsatom wrote:I forgot to mention the biggest benefit to cooking your own meals: variety. Often when riding outside of large towns and cities you come across the same menu over and over again. For example Germany - schnitzel and currywurst are delicious but after three days in a row I find the craving for pasta and vegetables gets too strong.


In Germany there are thousands of exotic restaurants - Italian, Greek, Spanish, Vietnamese, Turkish. There are many cafes open Sundays. There are so many foods one can eat without cooking. France has 365 cheeses. Germany has 365 breads. Watch out for the Luther celebrations in 2017, thousands of events are planned.
Entertainer, idealist, intellectual, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

psmiffy
Posts: 610
Joined: 1 May 2009, 1:32pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby psmiffy » 1 Jan 2017, 8:43pm

I’m afraid I’m always optimistic about finding cartridge gas canisters avec valve – I’ve toured in pretty much every country in western Europe and never had much of a problem finding gas or for that matter ever run out of gas – it helps that I’m happy using both the Lindell screw on type and the blue (Kharki in Greece) bayonet type and that carrying a spare is not a hardship. Not surprisingly looking in camping shops is a pretty much a no-brainer – after that I have found that hardware stores and fishing and gun shops often yield results.

Personally, if I was going to buy a new stove I would get a low profile remote type with a pre -heat coil – Lindell valve by default – plus a Vaude (was Markhill) Lindell to Camping Gaz adaptor

PhilWhitehurst
Posts: 260
Joined: 9 Aug 2011, 4:14pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby PhilWhitehurst » 1 Jan 2017, 8:50pm

If you want a hot drink in the morning an unbreakable flask can serve that purpose. Fill it up at a cafe in the evening then use for drinks in the morning.

PH
Posts: 9622
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 12:31am
Location: Derby
Contact:

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby PH » 1 Jan 2017, 8:58pm

PhilWhitehurst wrote:If you want a hot drink in the morning an unbreakable flask can serve that purpose. Fill it up at a cafe in the evening then use for drinks in the morning.

I used to carry a flask on long night rides and weekends away, but my Jetboil only weighs less than an extra 100g and if far more versatile.

willem jongman
Posts: 2076
Joined: 7 Jan 2008, 4:16pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby willem jongman » 2 Jan 2017, 9:01am

In that spirit: I often take a thermos. I fill it with hot water in the evening, and then have precisely one large cup of tea and one large cup of coffee in the morning without using the stove. That saves a lot of time. During the day the thermos is a source of cool water.

User avatar
Heltor Chasca
Posts: 3016
Joined: 30 Aug 2014, 8:18pm
Location: Near Bath & The Mendips in Somerset

To cook or not to cook?

Postby Heltor Chasca » 2 Jan 2017, 9:43am

I agree with Willem with regards to gas canisters. They proved to be a nightmare to source in the NL this summer. I'll reserve them for my long weekends in the U.K. and I'll use my Trangia with meths or my old Primus with white fuel for longer tours.

I like to sit still in the morning and wake up and take in the morning, so I don't need to rush. I'll also happily boil the water while packing up if time isn't on my side.
Last edited by Heltor Chasca on 2 Jan 2017, 9:43am, edited 1 time in total.

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 18486
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby Vorpal » 2 Jan 2017, 9:48am

The last time we did a family tour, I opted not to take any cooking equipment. I was on the tandem, and had a trailer full of stuff, plus Littlest (7 years old). We cycled to and stayed a few days at a camp ground with a little cafe on site, and a shop right across the road, so I didn't figure I would need it, and I barely had room for what we did take.

I regretted not having at least the equipment to make coffee or tea. When I went up to the cafe in the morning, I was always the first one & had to wait for the coffee to brew. It wasn't half as good as my own would have been, and I could have waited cozy in my pjs & sleeping bag.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

SA_SA_SA
Posts: 1934
Joined: 31 Oct 2009, 1:46pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby SA_SA_SA » 2 Jan 2017, 1:50pm

You could just bring a very small and lightweight coffee/tea only meths stove, perhaps using mug as pot eg


1) A local UK cottage stove: http://speedsterstoves.co.uk/custom-combined-windscreen-and-pot-rest-built-for-your-own-pot.html
Also sells burners (or make own).

2) A caldera cone http://www.traildesigns.com

3) Make your own (eg Captain Paranoia) Caldera cLone: http://zenstoves.net/PotStands-Conical.htm#ConeTemplates

4) some other DIY design
------------You may not use this post in Cycle or other magazine ------ 8)

User avatar
foxyrider
Posts: 5173
Joined: 29 Aug 2011, 10:25am
Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby foxyrider » 2 Jan 2017, 5:09pm

Gattonero wrote:Image


Wow! so much stuff! :?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/92281886@N02/15719606262/in/album-72157640250966045/) my total cooking/washing/first aid stuff for camping trips. The cooking gear is all in the Sea to Summit pack - s2s collapsible kettle/pot (1.3l https://www.trekkinn.com/outdoor-mountain/sea-to-summit-xkettle-1.3-liter/135906899/p?utm_source=google_products&utm_medium=merchant&id_producte=2288107&country=uk&gclid=CNun14X5o9ECFQqNGwodBMYO7A&gclsrc=aw.ds), Soto Windmaster stove & canister tripod, condiments, water bag, cutlery and emergency packet soup! Orikaso plate, mug, dish weigh nothing and are flat so slide down back of pannier.

set up works for morning coffee or if need be cooking/heating something more substantial.

I don't generally plan on cooking but a late night drink and of course a breakfast coffee are almost essential!
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

PH
Posts: 9622
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 12:31am
Location: Derby
Contact:

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby PH » 2 Jan 2017, 6:49pm

Jetboil, for those that don'r know it doesen't beat any records, it's not the fastest, smallest or lightest, it only really does what it says, boil. It is clean and convenient, for what it does I think it's the best
ImageJetboil in porch by Paul, on Flickr

User avatar
leftpoole
Posts: 1055
Joined: 12 Feb 2007, 9:31am
Location: Thornbury, South Gloucestershire.
Contact:

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby leftpoole » 3 Jan 2017, 10:28am

Hello,
I camp and in my own personal opinion I feel that if you camp without cooking, you are missing the best part!
Enjoy yourself. Make a mess of breakfast. It will taste the better for the fresh or hot or damp air!
Regards,
John

hamster
Posts: 3659
Joined: 2 Feb 2007, 12:42pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby hamster » 3 Jan 2017, 10:34am

I cannot do without a cup of tea / coffee in the morning, but am happy to eat cold food (like pastries) for breakfast and bread, cheese and salad for dinner. So personally something light and basic for quick water boiling is sufficient in summer. It all saves weight and personally I like to pack very light. With only 3 minutes per brew, fuel lasts a long time and range anxiety is avoided.

There is no single right answer on this, only what works for you.

khain
Posts: 245
Joined: 5 Feb 2014, 5:42pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby khain » 5 Jan 2017, 6:13pm

I say not to cook.

While you can get fairly compact and light cooking stuff it does complicate things quite a lot and can be time consuming. If you're just going for a fairly short tour in developed countries it should be easy enough to find places to eat and drink.

whoof
Posts: 2519
Joined: 29 Apr 2014, 2:13pm

Re: To cook or not to cook?

Postby whoof » 6 Jan 2017, 1:55pm

khain wrote:I say not to cook.

While you can get fairly compact and light cooking stuff it does complicate things quite a lot and can be time consuming. If you're just going for a fairly short tour in developed countries it should be easy enough to find places to eat and drink.


You can also find lots of places to stay without carrying the weight and haiving complication and time consuming hassle of putting up a tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag etc.