Cooking on small gas camp stoves

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HobbesOnTour
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby HobbesOnTour » 23 Jun 2019, 1:38pm

Tinnishill wrote:Does this help ?

Oh! I understood what you meant!
I'm a 2 portion kinda guy :D

nsew
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby nsew » 25 Jun 2019, 9:07am

pjclinch wrote:
nsew wrote:
andrew_s wrote:How do you explain tha Trangia gas adapter?


I don’t know. How do you explain the Trangia gas adaptor?


I explain it by using it in preference to the spirit burner, being more controllable, cleaner and simpler to use. While still retaining the advantages of what I think of as the inherent Trangiaosity of the thing: the most stable, best wind-shielded lightweight stove out there, neatly packaging its pan set in to the windshield and base for transport.

Pete.


I have never seen one but I fail to understand how it could be simpler to use compared with spirits. I place high value on simplicity/ease of use. A few points, the gas adaptor has a length of tube that is clearly vulnerable to accidental damage over time. Secondly, it’s pressurised gas just waiting to go off (fire bomb). Thirdly, where the hell am I gonna find the containers? Lastly, does the fuel clean a host of stuff, notably wounds?

Brucey
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Brucey » 25 Jun 2019, 11:21pm

swings and roundabouts, innit…? If there were one fuel that clearly outperformed all others in all respects, we'd all use that I expect. Depending on your priorities and situation any of the common fuels might be deemed 'most suitable'. Outside of that, personal preference and habituation are important too.

cheers
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nsew
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby nsew » 26 Jun 2019, 4:18pm

Brucey wrote:swings and roundabouts, innit…? If there were one fuel that clearly outperformed all others in all respects, we'd all use that I expect. Depending on your priorities and situation any of the common fuels might be deemed 'most suitable'. Outside of that, personal preference and habituation are important too.

cheers


I don’t disagree with any of that. If I were a weekend warrior I’d likely go with gas. Some of these threads don’t half go off on one - i’d be lying if I said it doesn’t amuse. I also rig my stove up this way on occasion (woodburner flipped) - takes a while longer due the proximity of the flame. I’m going to try and do something with this container to bump the height.
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Last edited by nsew on 26 Jun 2019, 7:09pm, edited 1 time in total.

nsew
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby nsew » 26 Jun 2019, 4:49pm

Something like this possibly? The leaning tower of cookset.
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Slowroad
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Slowroad » 29 Jun 2019, 8:49pm

#2 re windshields - I've got one from Wilko, sorry they don't stock them any more, but there's a lot of similar ones, with several rectangular metal sheets linked together.
I've used mine for years with an £8 Wilko gas cooker, which worked really well and I never had food sticking issues (unless I forgot to stir!) Then on a recent trip I got sprayed with liquid gas as I took the cooker off the canister and had to live off cold cuts till I found a camping shop and bought a Pocket Rocket (which the Wilko one had been modelled on, possibly...) It's good too, but maybe a little fiercer, so I'll have to stir a bit more.
Have had a Trangia since the early '80's (cost me £16!) but found it very big and couldn't get a proper low simmer heat, so it's been making me cuppas at the allotment for the last few years...
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pjclinch
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby pjclinch » 30 Jun 2019, 8:52am

nsew wrote:
pjclinch wrote:
nsew wrote:
I don’t know. How do you explain the Trangia gas adaptor?


I explain it by using it in preference to the spirit burner, being more controllable, cleaner and simpler to use. While still retaining the advantages of what I think of as the inherent Trangiaosity of the thing: the most stable, best wind-shielded lightweight stove out there, neatly packaging its pan set in to the windshield and base for transport.


I have never seen one but I fail to understand how it could be simpler to use compared with spirits.


It is simpler to screw a gas can in to a threaded adapter than to carefully pour an unpleasant, smelly, highly flammable liquid in to a small cup, particularly when you're tired. And that's before we get in to refuelling one that's probably, but not certainly run dry and there still might be a flame as you pour your fuel in.
It is simpler to turn down to a simmer by a simple adjustment knob rather than removing your pot, popping a simmer ring on to a flaming burner and then replacing the pot. And that's before we get in to adjusting a (very hot) simmer ring that was already in place.
It's simpler to light, especially when it's properly cold (unless you're daft enough to use pure butane).

nsew wrote:I place high value on simplicity/ease of use. A few points, the gas adaptor has a length of tube that is clearly vulnerable to accidental damage over time. Secondly, it’s pressurised gas just waiting to go off (fire bomb). Thirdly, where the hell am I gonna find the containers? Lastly, does the fuel clean a host of stuff, notably wounds?


The hose is armoured. Mine has managed about 20 years without getting obvious damage, so while more vulnerable than a spirit burner that's not the same as a problem waiting to happen.

If it's a bomb waiting to go off it's odd that with the amount of people cooking on gas when they camp that the summer news is not packed with camping deaths... In practice there are very few traumatic bomb detonations, but what is far more likely for cooking accidents is burns and that's more likely with pour-your-own liquid fuels subject to spills, or having to handle hot components when adding simmer rings or refuelling.

For the third one, I've always found shops quite good in that regard. And if I'm going somewhere where it'll be significantly easier to buy spirit than gas I've got the spirit burner, but that particular scenario doesn't crop up that much.

No, the fuel doesn't clean a host of stuff. Hey ho.

I've had my Trangia for over 30 years, and the gas conversion for about 20 of those. I've had a lot of experience of both the gas and spirit burners. I'm merely reporting what I've found to be the case from a lot of use.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

Caledonia64
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Caledonia64 » 12 Sep 2019, 1:45pm

st599_uk wrote:How do others do it? Does anyone have any favourite recipes?



I soak porridge oats, or oatmeal at least, overniight in water. I have never made porridge with milk, just water. It has stuck/burnt for me in the past (at home) if I neglect to stir the porridge due to some domestic uprising amongst the young uns. I have never had it stick while campiing beyond the usual "let the porriidge pot steep a whilie" scenario. I would never endeavour to wash a porridge pot (or scramble eggs pot) wiithout letting it steep for half an hour.
I am not sure how seasoning a pan would work with eg Trangia pans (cf domestic cast iron or steel pans). I have some of the anondised Trangia pans. Some not the anondised type. And some remarkably long lived Spaniish camping cookiing vessels. I would ensure maybe, that if reheating anything premade, you coat the pan with a squirt of one of those oils, or a wee bit knob of butter. And that there was enough water to prevent it dryiing enough to stick. And keep stirring, as well as turning down the intensity of the burner if you can. You usually can with the Bleuet stoves or you could with the ones I used to use. Whether you can get Bleuet canisters is another thing. I have also used the Trangia and Spanish pans (variously) on bigger Camping Gaz flat burners (but once I had no more access to a car gave that stove set up away).

I am looking to upgrade my Trangia by getting a wee Trangia specifiic gas burner with a multi fuel connection (because the problem of getting Bleuet canisters and because I have never been greatly keeen on the bottled fuel for the Trangia stove I have - only really necessary at altitude, and now - 20plus years on - there are better systems for that.

Caledonia64
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Caledonia64 » 12 Sep 2019, 1:54pm

nsew wrote:
pjclinch wrote:
nsew wrote:
I don’t know. How do you explain the Trangia gas adaptor?


I explain it by using it in preference to the spirit burner, being more controllable, cleaner and simpler to use. While still retaining the advantages of what I think of as the inherent Trangiaosity of the thing: the most stable, best wind-shielded lightweight stove out there, neatly packaging its pan set in to the windshield and base for transport.

Pete.


I have never seen one but I fail to understand how it could be simpler to use compared with spirits. I place high value on simplicity/ease of use. A few points, the gas adaptor has a length of tube that is clearly vulnerable to accidental damage over time. Secondly, it’s pressurised gas just waiting to go off (fire bomb). Thirdly, where the hell am I gonna find the containers? Lastly, does the fuel clean a host of stuff, notably wounds?



I never felt quite happy in using the spirit burner or carrying a bottle of combustible fuel. I used the Bleuet cannisters for years, and sometimes carried them and sometimes burned them off/empty before moving on. I liked the controllabiliity of the CampingGaz stoves (though I had a huge mission unsuccessful trying to find Bleuet cannisters recently). I am considering the Trangia gas majiggy stove because I have assorted Trangia pots and accoutrements of diifferent volumes, plus the windshield (though I may buy the wee fold up one). I like that the new gas adaptor has the option of using a whole range of gas cannisters/fuels.

I think the spirit burner has a place if you camp at altitude etc. I don't know why I have an issue with this: I will use kerosene or whatever for tilly and hurricane lamps at home (outside). I think I worry about spilling the fuel while camping/cooking on uneven ground and getting covered wiith it.

Caledonia64
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Caledonia64 » 12 Sep 2019, 2:02pm

horizon wrote:
HobbesOnTour wrote:
OP, I use a Trangia and have had issues with sticky porridge.


OP, I use a Trangia and have had no issues with sticky porridge. :D

I've got the hard anodised Trangia but I've never had problems with sticky porridge even with alu. The trick AFAICS is to stir it well right from the start when still cold and get all the oats surrounded and separated by water. Then stir again, and again. I use a wooden spoon.

PS I would try to avoid aluminium if you can and personally I wouldn't touch non-stick with a barge pole (let alone a metal implement). But I did say personally, YMMV. :D

I have the alu pans plus some questionable but serviceable 30 plus year old Spanish cooking vessesl, and the anodised Trangia (in various size options).
Never had porriidge stick while camping (only at home when domestic unrest amongst others causes me to abandon the porridge mid-process), but I soak the oatmeal overniight (in a tupperware/mess tin with lid or some such), and if porridge oats, as you said, stir.stir.stir with a wooden or silicon spoon/spatula (or a spurtle, of course). I also do not use milk in porridge but water.

Scrambled eggs can stick of course, as can baked beans if you do not give it your full attention, but then (as with porridge) you steep the pot.

WIth porridge, generally, and camping-wise, if you serve then soak immediately in cold water, the remains of the porridge solidifiies suddenly and lifts off making washing the pot easy.

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horizon
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby horizon » 15 Sep 2019, 10:58pm

Caledonia64 wrote:
WIth porridge, generally, and camping-wise, if you serve then soak immediately in cold water, the remains of the porridge solidifiies suddenly and lifts off making washing the pot easy.


+ 1 Generally I find it ready to clean off well before I've finished packing up in the morning - you just have to remember to soak it straightaway.
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Vorpal » 16 Sep 2019, 8:53am

I usually eat out of the pot. But I fill it with water straight away afterwards, and let it soak whilst I do other things. It's sometimes a little work to get the porridge off, but it does come off, with nothing more than water, a little washing up liquid, and my fingers. I use an old-fashioned enamelled steel pot.
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Warin61
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Warin61 » 22 Sep 2019, 3:56am

For porridge I use those Aldi instant oat packets 'Oat Sensations'. Boil water .. tare top off packet, put packet into my cup (yes - the paper containing the oats) . Poor water into paper container. Eat from paper container .. it is water proof. The cup gives stability and heat retention. When finished - open out the paper and consume the dregs. Usually 2 of them suffice for a quick breakfast. No washing up other than the spoon which is licked fairly clean anyway.

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Sweep
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Sweep » 22 Sep 2019, 11:54am

horizon wrote:
Caledonia64 wrote:
WIth porridge, generally, and camping-wise, if you serve then soak immediately in cold water, the remains of the porridge solidifiies suddenly and lifts off making washing the pot easy.


+ 1 Generally I find it ready to clean off well before I've finished packing up in the morning - you just have to remember to soak it straightaway.

Don't you have to let the pan cool before soaking?
I had the idea from somewhere that you shouldn't put cold water in a hot pan.
(Though possibly that only applied to domestic pans with a different material used for the base as a heat distributor )
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Sweep
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Re: Cooking on small gas camp stoves

Postby Sweep » 22 Sep 2019, 11:56am

Warin61 wrote:For porridge I use those Aldi instant oat packets 'Oat Sensations'. Boil water .. tare top off packet, put packet into my cup (yes - the paper containing the oats) . Poor water into paper container. Eat from paper container .. it is water proof. The cup gives stability and heat retention. When finished - open out the paper and consume the dregs. Usually 2 of them suffice for a quick breakfast. No washing up other than the spoon which is licked fairly clean anyway.

Am usually against individual packaging of basic foodstuffs, but will check out. They sound handy for occasional use when on the move/not at a campsite.
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