Trangia stoves

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SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 3 Feb 2016, 11:22am

Given how expensive Trangias are compared to their imitators, it seems strange they do not at least supply the larger pan in HA* (and perhaps the lid/frypan) even on their basic entry models. I bet it wouldn't add much cost....but would make the brand look better value.

*Hard anodized Aluminium the easier to clean but not quite non-stick material that replaced Ti/duossal pots: plastic non-stick is too fragile IMO.
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Gattonero
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Gattonero » 3 Feb 2016, 1:15pm

I am more than happy to pay a little more for a product that is made in Europe with better ethics.
Also, Trangia pans/ots even on the basic ones, they are as light as other Titanium cookware, yet quite strong. It's a much better material than cheaper copies.

Some people does ot like any coating at all on their pots/pans, a few do clean their cookware with sand, for example. Is good to have an option of 3 coatings for the same models, that is another thing that may pout the price above the cheap copies.
IMO, counting how many peices are inside a Taangia, it turns out than a single piece will be a fiver or something like that? It seems ok to me, I am not expectin to pay £20 for a 10 piece cookset.

You know, even the Kellie/Ghillie Kettle may look expensive, but if you see all the pieces, there's a lot of stuff for those 50-60 pounds, and is well made and does last.
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SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 3 Feb 2016, 1:47pm

But Hard Anodized is simply coated in a thicker layer of the ceramic Al Oxide than forms naturally on plain aluminium.

So I still think, as a quality brand, Trangia entry level pots should contain at least one HA pan.

I was simply observing that Trangia might be reducing their own sales by appearing mean/poorer value (which of course means less for Trangia workers....).
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Gattonero
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Gattonero » 3 Feb 2016, 2:09pm

Yes, I agree that some improvements have to be done.
A better design of the snuffer, for instance. And smaller design of their windshield so to have less gaps when the pots ar fitted in (lots of "dead air"), etc.

FWIW, I do prefer the Hard Anodized to the plain alloy or non-stick, it is indeed a great in-between with little that can go wrong.
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

PaulH75
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby PaulH75 » 3 Feb 2016, 9:03pm

Gattonero wrote:Not trying to be a flag-bearer, but I'd rather buy the original Made In Sweden one rather than funding a company that pays minimum wage to employees by selling copies of other products. If there is a choice, better stick with who gives their workers better life conditions.
syklist wrote:
PaulH75 wrote:
A differently branded version is currently available for £17 here http://www.sportsdirect.com/karrimor-cookset-and-burner-787092?colcode=78709290

This looks identical to a Biltema branded one I bought a couple of years ago.

If it is the same, then I would steer clear of it, it cannot be considered to be a substitute for a Trangia.


I absolutely agrre with both of you, definately buy the Trangia for whatever your reasons are, but if you only want to see if it works for you, the cheapest I've been able to find a genuine storm cooker style Trangia is £56 at Millets and that's for the very basic model in the sale. A bit expensive to find you don't like it whereas with the £17 model, it doesn't matter if you trash it, it's just a taster. Mine is a festival stove and I don't want my blingy kit being nicked out of my tent. Hence the capitalist scumbag version.

Alternatively for those looking you can get genuine Swedish Army version Trangias second hand from plenty of Army surplus places for between £10 and £20 dependant on condition. They aren't as stable as the storm cooker variety but they work well enough.

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Gattonero
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Gattonero » 4 Feb 2016, 8:29am

On festivals there's no cooking kit to carry, walk to the Greasy Spoon 8)
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

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leftpoole
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby leftpoole » 6 Feb 2016, 12:03pm

Vorpal wrote:I reviewed a ThermoPro stove a couple of months ago. I may have posted about it on your camping thread? Anyway, the review is viewtopic.php?f=18&t=55051
I can't speak for the Trangia, but mine is lighter and much cheaper. The only con is that it doesn't come with the pans, etc.

I though it was an excellent stove, and boiled water as quickly as a good electric kettle.

I would say that the biggest disadvantage of meths stoves (I have never used a Trangia, I have to admit), is that things take much longer to cook.

My coffee percolater takes about 5 minutes to make coffee on my current stove. Most of the time, it took about 15 - 20 minutes on the last meths stove I had. On windy days, it took longer & I gave up on cooking at all a couple of times.

Having used both meths stoves and vapour gas, I would never go back to meths. The little bit of extra hassle to carry & hook up a gas canister is more than worth it.


Trangia stoves are designed to utilise wind for cooking. In fact the vents are supposed to point towards the breeze!
Regards,
John (who uses..... Trangia)

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syklist
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby syklist » 8 Feb 2016, 7:33am

PaulH75 wrote:I absolutely agrre with both of you, definately buy the Trangia for whatever your reasons are, but if you only want to see if it works for you, the cheapest I've been able to find a genuine storm cooker style Trangia is £56 at Millets and that's for the very basic model in the sale. A bit expensive to find you don't like it whereas with the £17 model, it doesn't matter if you trash it, it's just a taster. Mine is a festival stove and I don't want my blingy kit being nicked out of my tent. Hence the capitalist scumbag version.

Alternatively for those looking you can get genuine Swedish Army version Trangias second hand from plenty of Army surplus places for between £10 and £20 dependant on condition. They aren't as stable as the storm cooker variety but they work well enough.

We still have seasonal sales here in Norway and sometimes you can find gear at significant discounts. Felleskjøpet had a sale of their limited selection of camping equipment at the end of the summer season a couple of years ago and I picked up a Series 25 with kettle, standard aluminium pans and non-stick frying pan for NOK 400 (about ukp 35 at the time). I haven't seen such a good deal since then.

For not much more than a "Swedish Army Trangia" you can get a Triangle or any of a number of other, more efficient burner holders and use your existing pans. The "Swedish Army Trangia" is a heavy, unstable and inconvenient beast with indestructable stainless steel pans that take ages to warm up. The burner is heavier than a Trangia one and sits on the ground both of which mean it can take a while for the burner to warm up if the ground is cold or wet. I bought a "Swedish Army Trangia" a while ago and while it is an amusing piece of kit to play with and use every now and again, it is not something I would want to use on a daily basis or in a hurry.
So long and thanks for all the fish...

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leftpoole
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby leftpoole » 8 Feb 2016, 10:43am

Hello,
I think that the real reason some of use use Trangia stoves, is the general feeling and smell of a slow breakfast?
John

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Heltor Chasca
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Trangia stoves

Postby Heltor Chasca » 8 Feb 2016, 11:28am

leftpoole wrote:Hello,
I think that the real reason some of use use Trangia stoves, is the general feeling and smell of a slow breakfast?
John




I've also got an older Primus Omnifuel stove. It is VERY impressive and with white fuel it is very hot. A brew is ready in nano seconds but you can simmer accurately too. Kept out the wind of course.

The BIG downside is the noise. It does sound like Bristol Airport on a busy day so forget any stealth camping. Also don't expect to make friends with your campsite neighbours if you're an early bird.

The Trangia is an efficient and nostalgic stove from my youth whilst cutting my teeth in the mountains in Moçambique. I can't fault it.

I also like taking a Crusader kit or in the summer, a hobo stove if I'm just brewing beverages. I've grown out of mixing rice, custard etc with my coffee.

Stove porn. I'm an addict...b

SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 8 Feb 2016, 5:36pm

Tatonka make a stainless '25' clone:

http://www.tatonka.com/Product/Outoor-Kitchen/Cookware/Multi-Set--A-Burner/en/1/4010

(upper windshield aluminium: lower looks stainless steel so no worries about wind melted UL trangia bases* :) )


*when holes point away from wind and down draft occurs
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SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 9 Feb 2016, 12:09pm

Here is an interesting slant on the Clikstand /Trangia Triangle style burner holder:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/112876.html
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syklist
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby syklist » 11 Feb 2016, 8:55am

leftpoole wrote:Hello,
I think that the real reason some of use use Trangia stoves, is the general feeling and smell of a slow breakfast?
John

:) I really never find the Trangia slow. In any case, I don't just sit down and make breakfast in the morning. The water for the coffee goes on and when that boils the toast goes on. By the time the toast is done the coffee has brewed and is ready to drink. In the intervening period I will get the bikes ready, start putting panniers on the bikes as Mrs Syklist packs in the gear in the inner tent. Whilst you could argue that we have tailored our morning routine to fit our Trangia, I can't really see how a faster cooker would improve things. I would also miss the silence of the Trangia and the fact that the first noise I hear is the sound that the water makes when coming to the boil.
So long and thanks for all the fish...

b1galus
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby b1galus » 12 Feb 2016, 9:51pm

i was never a fan of the Trangia . my friend had one and it always took forever to get a brew . i have lots of stoves probably about ten or so but now i have a Trangia and it is my main stove . i found out the problem with the stove was operator error and once i'd cured the 1d10t problem they are simple and efficient and most of all quiet

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Neilo
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Neilo » 14 Feb 2016, 7:47pm

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Best of both worlds
If it aint broke, fix it til it is.