Trangia stoves

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Sweep
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Sweep » 21 Feb 2016, 7:11pm

Ok

Pan so and so

And next time i'll be using italian, the language of love and gratuitous obscenity.
Sweep

bretonbikes
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby bretonbikes » 21 Feb 2016, 7:27pm

Sweep wrote:
bretonbikes wrote:
A man after my own heart. Mind you last time I took one of our led trip I cooked a copious cous-cous (lamb chops, merguez, chipolatas, veg and cous-cous) for 14 people on 5 Trangias;-) Mind you I did look a bit like Cozy Powell playing his drum kit...


:) loved the cozy powell image, though it does date you, and me of course.

Happy to find that i'm not totally mad using the 25 - have felt like a bit of a pan <i>[derogatory word removed]</i> until now.

Feel free to post that recipe breton.


It's not the recipe it's the technique.

As follows...

To do it on one Trangia

1 - First get a large tin of ratatouille or 'legumes for Cous-cous' and bring it to the boil (I add a little 'harisa' sauce). Take it off the stove (<10 minutes)

2 - Now sweat the sausages and Merguez down on the frying pan, thus filling it with delicious fat (the start of any good recipe - about 15 minutes)

3 - Boil the required amount of water and add the cous-cous grains (you can get cook-in-the-bag cous-cous but I prefer loose) - remove from cooker (it'll cook as it stands), place the plate with the merguez/sausages over the pan s a cover - this will keep them warm too... (5 minutes)

4 - Fry lamb chops in the very tasty fat - do this fast with intent so the inside is a bit pink (takes <5 minutes)

5 - Serve the chops, the cous-cous grains (having drained them and poured some of the even more tasty fat on them and stirred in), sausages Merguez and whilst doing this just pop the ratatouille on the stove to top up its heat - then add this too. (3 minutes)

Whilst doing all this you make a garnish of finely chopped onions and garlic, harisa (to taste) lemon (remove 1/2 the peel but chop the rest finely).

Total cooking/prep time @ 40 minutes

Now eat with gusto (to quote Johnathan Richmond) and wash down with a bottle of Algerian wine - the rougher the better...

Lastly - make sure the person you cooked for does the washing up.
35 years of cycletouring, 30 years of running cycling holidays, 5 years of running a campsite for cyclists - there's a pattern here...

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pjclinch
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby pjclinch » 21 Feb 2016, 7:50pm

I use a 25... Got it for a 21st present (I'll be 50 this year) and never saw much point in the 27.

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RickH
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby RickH » 21 Feb 2016, 7:50pm

Sweep wrote:Anyone find the 27 a bit too tiddly? The frying pan looks almost unusable for you do have to move stuff around a bit. Also the two pots are I think the same size in the 27 which maybe removes a certain flexibility?

Are the 27 pots/pans tiddly if you are stirring stuff around in them?

I perversely use the 25 for single use but am aware that it takes up more room in my pannier than is ideal.

I've never found size (or lack of it) to be a problem with my 27.

Nareloc wrote:I had a Trangia....for a couple of years. Then I found the Optimus Terra Solo Cook Set coupled with the Optimus Crux Lite burner - 272g as opposed to the 1100g of my Trangia setup. I can cook all I need on this gear. Takes up half the space too!

They look fine if a "cook in a mug" size pan (0.6l) is enough for you. It looks like you are comparing the weight with a full Trangia 25 kit (2 pans - 1.75l & 1.5l - plus 0.9l kettle). I reckon going minimalist with my 27 it weighs in at about 800g with just 1 pan packed, including a full (probably overfilled) burner. Still heavier than the Optimus kit, but about 300g lighter than you are quoting.

Rick

SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 22 Feb 2016, 1:07pm

Sweep wrote:Anyone find the 27 a bit too tiddly? The frying pan looks almost unusable for you do have to move stuff around a bit. Also the two pots are I think the same size in the 27 which maybe removes a certain flexibility?

I have a 27 (bought for hillwalking in the days when, in very windy mountain camps, it was either a trangia and hot dinner or a bleuet 206 and a cold dinner): the smaller packed size suits rucsacs and simpler cooking(packets/tins). I never used the frypan as anything but a lid. I suspect the 25's larger pans are better for cycle camping, I found the 27 pans a bit small for that (filled almost to brim if only one pan used to eat from).

But I wonder if a Trangia Triangle/clikstand and folding panel windshield might be OK/better for lowlevel camping than a full 25:
allows any make of pans and allows easier access to simmer control?
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Gattonero
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Gattonero » 22 Feb 2016, 1:55pm

Sweep wrote:Anyone find the 27 a bit too tiddly? The frying pan looks almost unusable for you do have to move stuff around a bit. Also the two pots are I think the same size in the 27 which maybe removes a certain flexibility?

Are the 27 pots/pans tiddly if you are stirring stuff around in them?

I perversely use the 25 for single use but am aware that it takes up more room in my pannier than is ideal.


The 27 is meant for the solo user, or two in a pinch.
I find it very usable, when I cook pasta for one (a good 200gr of, in 1/2lt water) or soup. They;re mainly meant to heat and light cooking, so you're not supposed to stir a lot around.
But given how solid i the whole Trangia assembly, I have no issues in stirring the food inside.

The frypan is good, what's the problem in cracking 2 eggs inside? Surely there isn't much room, but some compromises have to be made and IMO isn't a big deal at all
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby bretonbikes » 22 Feb 2016, 2:26pm

SA_SA_SA wrote:
Sweep wrote:Anyone find the 27 a bit too tiddly? The frying pan looks almost unusable for you do have to move stuff around a bit. Also the two pots are I think the same size in the 27 which maybe removes a certain flexibility?

I have a 27 (bought for hillwalking in the days when, in very windy mountain camps, it was either a trangia and hot dinner or a bleuet 206 and a cold dinner): the smaller packed size suits rucsacs and simpler cooking(packets/tins). I never used the frypan as anything but a lid. I suspect the 25's larger pans are better for cycle camping, I found the 27 pans a bit small for that (filled almost to brim if only one pan used to eat from).

But I wonder if a Trangia Triangle/clikstand and folding panel windshield might be OK/better for lowlevel camping than a full 25:
allows any make of pans and allows easier access to simmer control?


Found the clickstand a total waste of money. It removes all the attributes that make the Trangia so efficient so it becomes just another cheap, inefficient meths stove.

What's the matter with you guys - you are supposed to stir food gently, not whisk it!
35 years of cycletouring, 30 years of running cycling holidays, 5 years of running a campsite for cyclists - there's a pattern here...

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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 22 Feb 2016, 2:34pm

bretonbikes wrote:.....Found the clickstand a total waste of money. It removes all the attributes that make the Trangia so efficient so it becomes just another cheap, inefficient meths stove......

Was that using a it with a folding windshield* as well? * eg http://www.military1st.co.uk/products/gas003-highlander-camping-stove-wind-screen.html?gclid=COuymeLKi8sCFaoy0wodjdsJxw

On low level summer campsites I always found the 27 rather too hot even with simmer ring (but had not worked out that you could partially close the top disc :oops: : I just used it the same as the old flip top ones).
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby bretonbikes » 22 Feb 2016, 2:43pm

SA_SA_SA wrote:
bretonbikes wrote:.....Found the clickstand a total waste of money. It removes all the attributes that make the Trangia so efficient so it becomes just another cheap, inefficient meths stove......

Was that using a it with a folding windshield* as well? * eg http://www.military1st.co.uk/products/gas003-highlander-camping-stove-wind-screen.html?gclid=COuymeLKi8sCFaoy0wodjdsJxw

On low level summer campsites I always found the 27 rather too hot even with simmer ring (but had not worked out that you could partially close the top disc :oops: : I just used it the same as the old flip top ones).


Without the shield, but it just doesn't act as a chimney. As for the simmer ring, to actually simmer you need the disc almost completely closed;-)
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SA_SA_SA
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 22 Feb 2016, 6:13pm

bretonbikes wrote:......Without the shield, but it just doesn't act as a chimney. As for the simmer ring, to actually simmer you need the disc almost completely closed;-)

I eventually discovered that (Trangia could have explained it in the instructions ) but still find accessing the simmer control a pain hence my plan to try a 2nd hand triangle with windshield almost enclosing it (except when accessing simmer control etc). If that doesn't work perhaps I could cut a hinged door in the 27 windshield :) .

I wonder if people who cope best with the Trangia simmer control are highly organised persons? :)
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andrew_s
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby andrew_s » 22 Feb 2016, 8:38pm

pjclinch wrote:with a bit more leeway in the route the gas takes it's far more common for remote-can stoves to have the feed going over the flame to pre-heat the fuel. The point of doing that is it ensures you have gas coming out rather than any liquid, which makes it a lot safer to invert the canister and get every last wee bit of fuel out.

An "appropriate" gas stove is one that's got the pre-heat loop through the flame. and is routinely used with the canister upside down to feed liquid gas to the loop.

Gas is (typically) 70% butane and 30% propane, with the propane having a lower boiling point and higher vapour pressure than butane. If you use the canister upright, you are burning whatever mix is evaporating off the surface of the liquid gas, and because of the higher vapour pressure of propane, that will be a higher proportion of propane than there is in the liquid mix.
The end result is that by the time the canister is half used, there's no propane left, and the lowish vapour pressure of the remaining butane isn't high enough to push gas through the jet very fast.

If you use the canister upside down (except at start-up), you are burning liquid gas at 70% butane and 30% propane, and what you have in the canister will retain its 30% propane and be capable of giving good pressure right to the end.

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leftpoole
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby leftpoole » 23 Feb 2016, 9:26am

Gattonero wrote:
Sweep wrote:Anyone find the 27 a bit too tiddly? The frying pan looks almost unusable for you do have to move stuff around a bit. Also the two pots are I think the same size in the 27 which maybe removes a certain flexibility?

Are the 27 pots/pans tiddly if you are stirring stuff around in them?

I perversely use the 25 for single use but am aware that it takes up more room in my pannier than is ideal.


The 27 is meant for the solo user, or two in a pinch.
I find it very usable, when I cook pasta for one (a good 200gr of, in 1/2lt water) or soup. They;re mainly meant to heat and light cooking, so you're not supposed to stir a lot around.
But given how solid i the whole Trangia assembly, I have no issues in stirring the food inside.

The frypan is good, what's the problem in cracking 2 eggs inside? Surely there isn't much room, but some compromises have to be made and IMO isn't a big deal at all


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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 23 Feb 2016, 12:59pm

Link to previous post in case bretonbikes missed it due to the previous 2 posts :) http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=58276&p=985885#p985677
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby bretonbikes » 24 Feb 2016, 6:09pm

SA_SA_SA wrote:
bretonbikes wrote:......Without the shield, but it just doesn't act as a chimney. As for the simmer ring, to actually simmer you need the disc almost completely closed;-)

I eventually discovered that (Trangia could have explained it in the instructions ) but still find accessing the simmer control a pain hence my plan to try a 2nd hand triangle with windshield almost enclosing it (except when accessing simmer control etc). If that doesn't work perhaps I could cut a hinged door in the 27 windshield :) .

I wonder if people who cope best with the Trangia simmer control are highly organised persons? :)


Hmmm - organised perhaps, but I guess I love cooking and so am prepared to fiddle about to get the best from it. It also requires skill - like lighting the meths without taking the hairs off your hand, or placing the simmer ring on when the thing's red hot, I sort of like that;-)
35 years of cycletouring, 30 years of running cycling holidays, 5 years of running a campsite for cyclists - there's a pattern here...

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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby SA_SA_SA » 24 Feb 2016, 9:02pm

bretonbikes wrote:......It also requires skill - like lighting the meths without taking the hairs off your hand .....


Either a long nosed butane gas lighter or firesteel (keep the metal blade still and draw 'stone'/flint back towards you) are the easier lighting methods I find (long lighter is of course the easiest).
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