Trangia stoves

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Manx Cat
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Manx Cat » 6 Dec 2011, 10:14pm

Dilema ......


After reading these posts, the meths burners do seem to have a strong gathering...rather like steel framed bicycles :)

I take note on the purchasing of the fuel... I can easily get meths (we use gallons of it at work), gas needs to be sourced.... and I hear its noisy, I never thought of the noise. I have been looking and looking at stoves on line, some seem really light, but then you have to add the weight and space needed for the fuel cannister, plus all the cooking gear (pots pans etc) whereas with the Trangia its all included, you know what the weight will be.

I looked on YouTube, and yes, some nice person on there has it all on film, the Trangia looks a lot more gentle, with its gentle flame. I wonder if the gas might be a bit... ferocious, well, like the gas cooker at home and I have lost eyebrows using that!

Thank you everyone for your thoughts on this thread...

The winter time is fast approaching and I have my birthday in March (Him indoors never knows what to buy me..)

Lots of time to think, but I feel I have now made up my mind. Trangia do get hundreds of happy customers after all.


M

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hubgearfreak
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby hubgearfreak » 6 Dec 2011, 11:05pm

Manx Cat wrote:gas needs to be sourced.... and I hear its noisy


to be fair, it's not exactly noisy, it's just not silent.

the beauty of a trangia is that if you set it before you go to bed, you need only drop a lit match in and the kettle's on, whilst you're still half asleep/hungover/making love/whatever :wink:

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pjclinch
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby pjclinch » 7 Dec 2011, 10:33am

A Trangia running on spirit is almost silent. A Trangia running on gas (or other gas stove) makes quite abit more noise, but nothing that will prevent slumber or conversation. Quite a few liquid fuel pressure stoves (for example, my Primus MFS) sound like a turbo-jet.

It's worth noting that "you need only drop a lit match in" assumes certain things about the ambient temperature. If it's around freezing all that will happen is the match will go out IME. Another downside of spirit is it burns up relatively fast so on a big job the burner will need refuelling which is a faff needing considerable care. I've found gas is the easiest thing to light.

I particularly like a Trangia running on gas. The Gas conversion is over-priced for what it is, but it does work very well and you get the rock-solid stability and storm-proofing of the Trangia with the convenience and controllability of gas. But it's all a bit bulky and heavy so i usually only use it out of the boat, preferring a remote-can gas stove with a folding windshield for cycle touring.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

Jack
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Jack » 7 Dec 2011, 10:40am

hubgearfreak wrote:the beauty of a trangia is that if you set it before you go to bed, you need only drop a lit match in and the kettle's on, whilst you're still half asleep/hungover/making love/whatever :wink:


Yeah, it's a bugger having to turn a knob AND strike a match. :wink:

LANDSURFER74

Re: Trangia stoves

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 7 Dec 2011, 4:59pm

As i have pointed out ... the coleman conversion costs only £12 ..and that includes a re-sealable gas cylinder...

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pedalsheep
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby pedalsheep » 7 Dec 2011, 7:54pm

As i have pointed out ... the coleman conversion costs only £12 ..and that includes a re-sealable gas cylinder...


Could you provide a link for this please Landsurfer? My search only comes up with the official Trangia version. At that price I'd be keen to try it altho my Trangia is so old it doesn't have the hole for the gas hose.
'Why cycling for joy is not the most popular pastime on earth is still a mystery to me.'
Frank J Urry, Salute to Cycling, 1956.

LANDSURFER74

Re: Trangia stoves

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 7 Dec 2011, 8:12pm

IMG_0325.JPG
IMG_0325.JPG


Coleman power ...works absolutly fine....
Image Attachments
IMG_0326.JPG

Edwards
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Edwards » 7 Dec 2011, 8:32pm

LANDSURFER74 wrote:Coleman power ...works absolutly fine....


From the picture it looks like a stove that is used inside the Trangia windshield.
Is the gas control inside?
If so does it get hot?
Does the canister get hot?
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar

willem jongman
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby willem jongman » 7 Dec 2011, 9:01pm

Indeed, gas stove makers always warn against cannisters getting too hot. This is turning the Trangia into a bomb.
Willem

LANDSURFER74

Re: Trangia stoves

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 7 Dec 2011, 10:56pm

Ah Ha! ... you fell for the phyisics trap .. the burner is above the Trangia air inlet .. therefore, the burner draws cool air in to the cooker .. over the gas cartridge...providing a constant cooling effect to the gas supply ..however the air drawn in is above ambient temp as it is partially heated by the higher temp of the alloy structure... due to the burn at the cooking face .... therefore the gas cartridge works at an efficient temp ...... 7 years, 22 gas cartridges and no bomb ....... in the words of Mr. Hawking ..." do the maths" ..... :)
i have !

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hubgearfreak
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby hubgearfreak » 8 Dec 2011, 12:31am

willem jongman wrote:This is turning the Trangia into a bomb.


i wouldn't use it

Aushiker
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Aushiker » 8 Dec 2011, 1:49am

LANDSURFER74 wrote:Coleman power ...works absolutly fine....


I am struggling to see what the advantage is of this setup. Seems to me that it all it is doing is making a heavy stove system heavier for no gain. Wouldn't it be better to use the gas stove with a light weight windshield if that is the point of this or am I missing something here?

Andrew

LANDSURFER74

Re: Trangia stoves

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 8 Dec 2011, 8:03am

As previously posted it depends what you want to do with the cooker , if its just a cuppa or a pot noodle then the minimun set up if fine.
But if you are camping in the hills as i do and want to cook meals, often for 3-4 people, the trangia / coleman set up is fast , clean and stable.
Everything packs into the trangia and the weight differance is minimal as you do not have the weight of the meths or its container...

Edwards
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Edwards » 8 Dec 2011, 8:15am

I also asked more than one question. The physics (without the maffs) also state that for that type of burner, the ones with a small flame directed straight up do have a tendency to reflect the heat straight back down. Heating the control valve and the connection to the cylinder, this does indeed help in really cold weather but overheats the rubber O ring.
You have also forgot about the Toroidal effect of the heat circulation in the upper part, so in the words of you know who. Not quite fully explained can do better D-. :wink:
Markill made a from of windshield that went between the burner and the control valve and that also suffered from the convection of heat, but I bet no where near as much as that set up.

Also how do you control the heat?
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar

LANDSURFER74

Re: Trangia stoves

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 8 Dec 2011, 8:21pm

There is a control knob on the side of the burner..... fairly obvious ..... your turn ..... :)

I've been cooking like this for years ... no bomb ...no problem ..... my actual, practicle experiance versus .......what exactly ???????