Where to see Hillegberg tents

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tatanab
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby tatanab » 23 Sep 2014, 10:02am

leftpoole wrote:the most important thing is porch size for cooking and storage.
I have no porch at all!

I went free standing about 5 years ago after a tour of tying guys to rocks and bushes because the ground was so hard. I bought a Hilleberg Unna which has no porch but has enough space between inner and outer to stow bags if you do not want them inside with you. The inner can be decoupled from a corner to allow cooking if need be. I have used it in weeks of very wet weather and in times of very dry. I am quite happy with it thank you.

For the OP - a bit far from you, alpenstock do good prices for Hilleberg and will erect them for comparison. They put up a Soulo and the Unna for me to compare. http://www.alpenstock.co.uk/

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pjclinch
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby pjclinch » 23 Sep 2014, 10:06am

leftpoole wrote:Two doors are not a necessity and the most important thing is porch size for cooking and storage.


Even as a fan of two-door designs I'd agree with the former. Hille's web site says:

Single or dual entrances: Our dual door/dual vestibule tents offer greater convenience, more storage, and, in some cases, more venting options. Taller people often find them more comfortable, since a two door inner tent has more usable space. The downside: extra weight.


But for myself, I'll take the extra weight.

I'm also a fan of plenty of porch, though since this is particularly Hilleberg tents I'd say the only one where lack of porch is potentially an issue is the Unna, with quite deliberately no porch to speak of. Having said that, you can always unhook the inner and have plenty of cooking space and with a generously sized inner you've got the options of folding away one corner of the inner for wet/mucky stuff, or just bringing everything inside.

"The most important thing" varies between campers. If lightest possible weight is the goal then Hilles are not the way forwards, also not if you want price tags below £400 :(

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phil parker
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby phil parker » 23 Sep 2014, 5:27pm

There are some good posts on this thread with valid experience - and of course, it's one's own experience that determines which is the best or better tent to use for a specific occasion.

As well as my Nallo 2 GT and Soulo (I have also owned an Akto) - I have a lightweight Easton Kilo. The Easton Kilo is a fantastic tent, it is very light at 1.1 kgs as packed on my digital scales, but it has its limitations. The built in ground sheet without a footprint is often insufficient even on soft ground as damp can seep through: I wouldn't want to try it on rough ground without a footprint. I have snapped one of the carbon poles in very windy, blustery weather, which Easton replaced FOC! However, there are many occasions when I would rather have to carry the heavier weight of one of my Hillebergs to suit the weather conditions or for the extra space/porch - and I would love to try one of the other models as well!

b1galus
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby b1galus » 23 Sep 2014, 5:55pm

"There are some good posts on this thread with valid experience - and of course, it's one's own experience that determines which is the best or better tent to use for a specific occasion.

As well as my Nallo 2 GT and Soulo (I have also owned an Akto) - I have a lightweight Easton Kilo. The Easton Kilo is a fantastic tent, it is very light at 1.1 kgs as packed on my digital scales, but it has its limitations. The built in ground sheet without a footprint is often insufficient even on soft ground as damp can seep through: I wouldn't want to try it on rough ground without a footprint. I have snapped one of the carbon poles in very windy, blustery weather, which Easton replaced FOC! However, there are many occasions when I would rather have to carry the heavier weight of one of my Hillebergs to suit the weather conditions or for the extra space/porch - and I would love to try one of the other models as well!"


now interestingly (or not) i have a big agnes tent which had the same sort of problem . it is a great wee tent just useless when the ground is soggy . so i have sent it away to SMG ( Scottish Mountain Gear ) to have a hilleberg style floor fitted .
cost is fifty quid and i consider that money well spent

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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby phil parker » 23 Sep 2014, 6:05pm

b1galus wrote:now interestingly (or not) i have a big agnes tent which had the same sort of problem . it is a great wee tent just useless when the ground is soggy . so i have sent it away to SMG ( Scottish Mountain Gear ) to have a hilleberg style floor fitted .
cost is fifty quid and i consider that money well spent


Mmm...that is interesting, and I've used SMG before, thanks for that, it is not much more than the cost of a footprint and something I may consider!

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pjclinch
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby pjclinch » 23 Sep 2014, 9:44pm

It's worth noting that thin floors are more subject to condensation when they get very cold (i.e., there's loads of cold water right under them). While first reaction may be "well what's the difference between that and a leak?", the salient point is that after a thin film of droplets overnight things generally don't get any worse, while a leak is a serious, ongoing problem.

To check if it's condensation or a leak suspend a bit of the inner floor and fill it with water. If it's leaking you'll likely get continuous dripping after a short while while if it's actually properly waterproof the water inside will stay there.

Any groundsheet will pick up a bit of condensation in sufficiently onerous conditions. Worst case I had was when I pitched on a snow-drift that thawed in rain overnight: 100% humidity and the groundsheet was actually floating the next morning where my weight wasn't on it. A film of condensation, but if it had been leaking everything in there would have been saturated.

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phil parker
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby phil parker » 23 Sep 2014, 10:28pm

Interesting point, Pete, and thanks for your explanation.

The main symptom was that the bottom of my sleeping mat was soaking wet in the morning (lightweight inflatable) and depending on the weather, was difficult to dry out before packing away and arriving at my next destination. A symptom I don't get with my Hilleberg (and other mountain) tents!

khain
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby khain » 23 Sep 2014, 11:17pm

I wouldn't go for a Nallo unless you really need a four season tent with a huge porch.

The porch on my Nallo leaks quite badly and when I contacted Hilleberg about it they told me that's just the way it's made - the silicon coating makes the outer very strong but it can't be taped so the stitching can leak. It also shakes about a lot in strong wind, which apparently makes it less likely to break in storms but is annoying.

In extreme conditions you will no doubt appreciate the Nallo's strengths but for more conservative use they can actually be a nuisance which you're paying rather a lot for. A free-standing 3-season tent with side entrances is probably a better choice for cycle touring, though there isn't a great choice in the UK.

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pjclinch
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby pjclinch » 24 Sep 2014, 8:50am

phil parker wrote:The main symptom was that the bottom of my sleeping mat was soaking wet in the morning (lightweight inflatable) and depending on the weather, was difficult to dry out before packing away and arriving at my next destination. A symptom I don't get with my Hilleberg (and other mountain) tents!


Yep, sounds like condensation. A wipe with a camping towel, or a fleece or similar will generally do enough IME. The thicker the groundsheet (and compared to most these days Hilles have thick ones) the less likely it is to happen, because it's harder to draw heat through it, but in the right (wrong!) conditions I've had the Kaitum quite damp inside too.

khain wrote:The porch on my Nallo leaks quite badly and when I contacted Hilleberg about it they told me that's just the way it's made - the silicon coating makes the outer very strong but it can't be taped so the stitching can leak. It also shakes about a lot in strong wind, which apparently makes it less likely to break in storms but is annoying.


The stitching on an untaped seam can indeed leak, though to be honest I think that's the first time I've come across a Hille that does. That doesn't help you, of course, but some seam taping goop (any good outdoor shop doing camping stuff should have some) is all you need to seal them up so they're waterproof. Takes a few minutes and can be messy but it's not hard and it does work.

To solve the shaking in strong winds add more poles and make it geodesic. Now it's a Jannu, and it's quite a bit heavier and it costs more! One downside of tunnels is certainly that they're typically noisier than geodesics of the same size, and if you want a very quiet night it's worth considering. As are earplugs.

khain wrote:A free-standing 3-season tent with side entrances is probably a better choice for cycle touring, though there isn't a great choice in the UK.


If you want that and a Hille then the Rogen may well be your boy. I've yet to see any of the 3 season ones in the flesh so will not comment much more beyond saying it looks nice on paper, until (no surprises here) you see the price...

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khain
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby khain » 27 Sep 2014, 1:48pm

pjclinch wrote:The stitching on an untaped seam can indeed leak, though to be honest I think that's the first time I've come across a Hille that does. That doesn't help you, of course, but some seam taping goop (any good outdoor shop doing camping stuff should have some) is all you need to seal them up so they're waterproof. Takes a few minutes and can be messy but it's not hard and it does work.

I've done it. Worked for a while but has started leaking again. It's annoying having to do this every few months, particularly on a £600+ tent, and it looks ugly.
pjclinch wrote:To solve the shaking in strong winds add more poles and make it geodesic. Now it's a Jannu, and it's quite a bit heavier and it costs more! One downside of tunnels is certainly that they're typically noisier than geodesics of the same size, and if you want a very quiet night it's worth considering. As are earplugs.

Alternatively, save some money by buying a geodesic tent that isn't a Hilleberg. I don't mean to be rude but you seem to have some sort of consumer tunnel vision, where the only solution you can see to problems is to invest more time and money in an extremely expensive brand, rather than recognise that the simplest solution is to go for another brand. If I was going for another tent now I almost certainly wouldn't go for Hilleberg unless it was for serious expeditions.

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pjclinch
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby pjclinch » 27 Sep 2014, 9:44pm

khain wrote:
pjclinch wrote:The stitching on an untaped seam can indeed leak, though to be honest I think that's the first time I've come across a Hille that does. That doesn't help you, of course, but some seam taping goop (any good outdoor shop doing camping stuff should have some) is all you need to seal them up so they're waterproof. Takes a few minutes and can be messy but it's not hard and it does work.

I've done it. Worked for a while but has started leaking again. It's annoying having to do this every few months, particularly on a £600+ tent, and it looks ugly.


Oh, it's annoying and it doesn't look nice (I've treated my Spacepacker, both my Hilles are fine as they are), but there again you haven't weakened the seams by heat-ageing when applying tape, and you haven't added nearly so much weight as taping either.

khain wrote:
pjclinch wrote:To solve the shaking in strong winds add more poles and make it geodesic. Now it's a Jannu, and it's quite a bit heavier and it costs more! One downside of tunnels is certainly that they're typically noisier than geodesics of the same size, and if you want a very quiet night it's worth considering. As are earplugs.

Alternatively, save some money by buying a geodesic tent that isn't a Hilleberg. I don't mean to be rude but you seem to have some sort of consumer tunnel vision, where the only solution you can see to problems is to invest more time and money in an extremely expensive brand, rather than recognise that the simplest solution is to go for another brand. If I was going for another tent now I almost certainly wouldn't go for Hilleberg unless it was for serious expeditions.


I've already mentioned the Saunders (actually the last tent I used) and there's also our Primus family tent and two MSRs as well as the Hilles which suggest my brand fixation is a bit more catholic than you thought, but I was talking about the Hilles because that's what the OP seemed to be asking about.

If I were going for another tent now it might be a Hille... if the particular job in hand suited one of their tents better than anything else. For the jobs we use our Hilles for (the Tarra for total bombproofing while being easy to pitch in horrendous conditions (generally out of a boat), the Kaitum for twin entrance convenience and masses of space with fair strength at a reasonable weight) we got them because they seem to do it better than anything else we found. I'm more interested in space and pitching convenience than lightest weight or minimum noise, a priority for either of which would probably put a Hille out of the running.

Anyone thinking a Hille must be the best choice for anything is surely rather short-sighted and perhaps overcome by brand-bling, but the brand-bling is there because if they are the right thing they're damn hard to beat. That a Nallo is wrong for your particular job doesn't make it bad, period, just wrong for your particular job.

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groberts
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Re: Where to see Hillegberg tents

Postby groberts » 3 Nov 2014, 2:11pm

Postscript:

Went to Taunton Leisure in Taunton a few weeks ago - they were very good; moved all the clothes racks aside and erected the Nallo 3GT and Anjan 3GT right in the middle of the shop! After some more thinking and looking around have gone for the Nallo 3GT from Taunton Leisure + footprint. It is by far the most expensive tent I've ever bought but it's reputation is such that I have high hopes, time will tell, though I expect it'll be 2015 before I first get to use the tent. Thanks for everyone's thoughts.