Just starting out

Specifically for cycle touring subjects & questions
Vinko
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Re: Just starting out

Postby Vinko » 28 Jan 2015, 9:55am

Heltor Chasca wrote:Oooh! Forgot. Never carried it on my bike (yet) (and could be a sight lit on my rear rack!) but I use a Kelly Kettle a lot. Handy at work (I work outdoors) and dead handy car-camping. Tea everyone? Only downside is that it provides enough boiling water for you ALWAYS to get roped into doing the washing up....hc



I too have a Kelly Kettle (I do a lot of work outside also and my other interests are Bushcraft - combines well with cycle touring!). They are a bit pricey and rather bulky, but hey...I love it! I used it exclusively last year for a cycle trip (with tarp instead of tent). Absolutely great, and no fuel worries (it burns twigs and leaves etc). I have a cooking pot that fits onto mine. Its a different to just using a gas burner (and the Trangia) of course, but as mentioned.....oodles of boiling hot water - even for me drinking tea by the pint!

One thing I was concerned about was that it produces smoke of course, and that felt a little uncomfortable on the "official" camp site I stayed at and also quite conspicuous on the "stealth" ones I used. But a super way of boiling water!

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Heltor Chasca
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Joined: 30 Aug 2014, 8:18pm
Location: Near Bath & The Mendips in Somerset

Re: Just starting out

Postby Heltor Chasca » 29 Jan 2015, 7:22pm

Vinko wrote:
Heltor Chasca wrote:Oooh! Forgot. Never carried it on my bike (yet) (and could be a sight lit on my rear rack!) but I use a Kelly Kettle a lot. Handy at work (I work outdoors) and dead handy car-camping. Tea everyone? Only downside is that it provides enough boiling water for you ALWAYS to get roped into doing the washing up....hc



I too have a Kelly Kettle (I do a lot of work outside also and my other interests are Bushcraft - combines well with cycle touring!). They are a bit pricey and rather bulky, but hey...I love it! I used it exclusively last year for a cycle trip (with tarp instead of tent). Absolutely great, and no fuel worries (it burns twigs and leaves etc). I have a cooking pot that fits onto mine. Its a different to just using a gas burner (and the Trangia) of course, but as mentioned.....oodles of boiling hot water - even for me drinking tea by the pint!

One thing I was concerned about was that it produces smoke of course, and that felt a little uncomfortable on the "official" camp site I stayed at and also quite conspicuous on the "stealth" ones I used. But a super way of boiling water!


Agreed on all points. I wouldn't worry about the smoke on posh campsites though. I've only ever had 'oohs' and 'aahs' from those who have never seen a 'boiling urn'. Most people can't get enough of the smell of a proper wood fire. Albeit a 2 minute one!

You've spurred me on to ride along with it lit and boiling water while strapped to my rear rack. KK will surely put the picture up on their site. Either that or I'll get told off by any passing H&S elfs...hc

Vinko
Posts: 180
Joined: 27 Feb 2014, 7:11pm

Re: Just starting out

Postby Vinko » 30 Jan 2015, 12:08pm

Heltor Chasca wrote:

You've spurred me on to ride along with it lit and boiling water while strapped to my rear rack. KK will surely put the picture up on their site. Either that or I'll get told off by any passing H&S elfs...hc


:lol:


Reminds me of when I used to keep bees, I often cycled with the smoker fixed to my rack! I also collected swarms on the bike too, but that's another story.

This has inspired me to use the KK again this year. Sorry, strayed off topic, but in some ways, it really is ideal for cycle camping.

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Heltor Chasca
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Location: Near Bath & The Mendips in Somerset

Re: Just starting out

Postby Heltor Chasca » 30 Jan 2015, 2:10pm

Vinko wrote:
Heltor Chasca wrote:

You've spurred me on to ride along with it lit and boiling water while strapped to my rear rack. KK will surely put the picture up on their site. Either that or I'll get told off by any passing H&S elfs...hc


:lol:


Reminds me of when I used to keep bees, I often cycled with the smoker fixed to my rack! I also collected swarms on the bike too, but that's another story.

This has inspired me to use the KK again this year. Sorry, strayed off topic, but in some ways, it really is ideal for cycle camping.


Brilliant! I like this story. I've got a little experience with natural beekeeping and it's all about smooth, gentle work. You have my maximum respect for collecting swarms on a bike. One of those new fat-bikes with low tyre pressure would work.

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smuggers
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Location: Lancashire

Re: Just starting out

Postby smuggers » 14 Apr 2015, 7:13am

Sorry to jump in on this thread, but I'm new to touring with a tent and cooking equipment.. I have just picked up a vango folding stove & think I read on here a plumbers mat is a wise purchase. I have only wild camped before and usually find a large stone to cook on. I will be staying on a campsite next month & I'm a bit worried about cooking in the porch of my small 2 man tent. Some great post's on this thread btw.. :-)
When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. --H.G. Wells

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Heltor Chasca
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Re: Just starting out

Postby Heltor Chasca » 14 Apr 2015, 9:13am

I normally cook outside unless it's raining. I just don't like cooking smells in my tent and sleeping bag. That plumbers' mat idea is a good one. None of my stoves heat up underneath so no scorching to worry about. I put my KK on a stove or in the fire pit...b

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foxyrider
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Re: Just starting out

Postby foxyrider » 14 Apr 2015, 10:02am

smuggers wrote:Sorry to jump in on this thread, but I'm new to touring with a tent and cooking equipment.. I have just picked up a vango folding stove & think I read on here a plumbers mat is a wise purchase. I have only wild camped before and usually find a large stone to cook on. I will be staying on a campsite next month & I'm a bit worried about cooking in the porch of my small 2 man tent. Some great post's on this thread btw.. :-)


Never used anything under my stoves, i ground the canister to stop it moving IMO putting it on a mat might introduce some instability and any heat should be going up not down, from my experience putting a cup of hot drink on the grass causes far more damage than the stove!.

Of course always cook in a well ventilated place, use the porch if its chucking it down but make sure the stove is well away from the canvas.

If its dry i usually cook away from the tent - most campsites have picnic tables you can use or even camper lounges/kitchens.

have fun
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

Weimarunner
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Joined: 19 Apr 2014, 2:58pm

Re: Just starting out

Postby Weimarunner » 14 Apr 2015, 10:25am

I keep it simple, I only need to boil water and warm the odd soup, so my entire camp kitchen is a titanium meths stove, a titanium 750ml mug/pot and a 8g spoon. Total weight 150grams, done!
Great little stove - http://www.cycletourstore.co.uk/evernew ... hol-stove/

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smuggers
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Location: Lancashire

Re: Just starting out

Postby smuggers » 14 Apr 2015, 2:58pm

Heltor Chasca wrote:I normally cook outside unless it's raining. I just don't like cooking smells in my tent and sleeping bag. That plumbers' mat idea is a good one. None of my stoves heat up underneath so no scorching to worry about. I put my KK on a stove or in the fire pit...b


Hopefully my pitch will be in a quiet part of the campsite & the weather will be kind for cooking outdoors..

foxyrider wrote:
smuggers wrote:Sorry to jump in on this thread, but I'm new to touring with a tent and cooking equipment.. I have just picked up a vango folding stove & think I read on here a plumbers mat is a wise purchase. I have only wild camped before and usually find a large stone to cook on. I will be staying on a campsite next month & I'm a bit worried about cooking in the porch of my small 2 man tent. Some great post's on this thread btw.. :-)


Never used anything under my stoves, i ground the canister to stop it moving IMO putting it on a mat might introduce some instability and any heat should be going up not down, from my experience putting a cup of hot drink on the grass causes far more damage than the stove!.

Of course always cook in a well ventilated place, use the porch if its chucking it down but make sure the stove is well away from the canvas.

If its dry i usually cook away from the tent - most campsites have picnic tables you can use or even camper lounges/kitchens.



have fun


I dont have a stove that attaches directly to the canister..I have this one - http://www.blacks.co.uk/equipment/11438 ... stove.html which I thought would be better because of the low centre of gravity.. Didn't pay £25 for it btw, think I picked it up for £17. Thanks for the good advice foxyrider.. :-)

Weimarunner wrote:I keep it simple, I only need to boil water and warm the odd soup, so my entire camp kitchen is a titanium meths stove, a titanium 750ml mug/pot and a 8g spoon. Total weight 150grams, done!
Great little stove - http://www.cycletourstore.co.uk/evernew ... hol-stove/


Now that is a nice bit of kit Weimarunner & like yourself I will only be warming food up & boiling water.. Maybe I'll lighten my kit up in the coming years & learn from mistakes I'm bound to make.. 150g for your set up is most impressive.
When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. --H.G. Wells

Weimarunner
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Joined: 19 Apr 2014, 2:58pm

Re: Just starting out

Postby Weimarunner » 14 Apr 2015, 10:15pm

smuggers wrote:
Now that is a nice bit of kit Weimarunner & like yourself I will only be warming food up & boiling water.. Maybe I'll lighten my kit up in the coming years & learn from mistakes I'm bound to make.. 150g for your set up is most impressive.


A 750ml mug pot is really handy as it boils enough water to hydrate a meal and have a cuppa. The 750ml mug pot is only 15g more than the 550ml version, it's no wider but is deeper so you can fit the stove, spoon and fuel container inside.