Home exercise - what equipment?

Tangled Metal
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Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 15 Nov 2015, 9:39pm

We're keen cyclists but basically just leisure riders mixed with commuting. Being time pressed we're not going riding enough to keep our fitness. With winter it's even worse. This is leading us to look at home fitness equipment.

At this point turbo trainers come to mind but since we're not about training for competitive cycling or sportive are they best? We've a 26" and 700 wheeled bikes, the hassle of going to an outside shed to bring in a bike after a wet commute on a cold, wet night is a good dis-incentive. Plus noisy at low/mid price right? Baby.sleeping in the house and neighbours perhaps not good.

This leads me on to other exercise equipment kept inside. Exercise/spinning/indoor bike is one option. Are they noisy? Can't remember since I stopped going to the gym years ago.

Rowers, elliptical trainers, etc. All options but what is a good option? What would you suggest if noise and space is an issue plus budget say £300?

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al_yrpal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby al_yrpal » 15 Nov 2015, 10:52pm

I have a rower which I keep in the conservatory in the winter. It folds up easily so if we want it out of the way its easy. Its a V fit AMR1 magnetic/air type and I think its just as good as the Concept Ones that I have tried at the gym. Gives decent non impact exercise to arms shoulders tummy and legs.

Al
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Vorpal » 15 Nov 2015, 11:14pm

A Turbo trainer has the advantage of being relatively inexpensive. Some are not too noisy, though of course, the quieter you get the more expensive.

My kids both slept through the turbo running, and a movie usually going loud enough to hear over the turbo at the same time.

spinning bikes are mostly quieter, but of course they tak eup more space, and are a bit more expensive.

You could try rollers? They're a bti more interested than a turbo trainer, generally a bit less expensive, and generally not noisy.
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Tangled Metal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 16 Nov 2015, 7:18am

For most people I'd agree with a rower being a good choice since I believe you can get them so they fold up and stand against the wall out of the way. Used to use the gym concept rowers a lot as cv exercise plus as a gauge of performance. However something happened, I don't know what, and I found the rowing motion trapped a nerve or something in my upper leg/behind. I can only row for about 20 seconds before pain gets too much.

So far turbo and exercise bike of some sort are favorites. Both have plus and minus points. Certainly at the £300 mark.

Tangled Metal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 16 Nov 2015, 8:05am

Turbo pros- good workout, compact, use own bike which fits well. can be bought cheaply and decent at price limit.
Cons- have to use own bike = getting it out of shed to bring inside when it's wet from commute, faff to set up at 700 and 26" sizes for 2 different users and noisy in a lot of cases at price range.

Exercise bike pros- kept indoors so easily reached and clean. Easy to change setup for two users, perhaps easier to use due to programmes setup in bike control unit = no searching internet for turbo training plans.

Cons- bulky so have a permanent object filling out a corner of a room, potentially less effective than a turbo and at lower prices limited I think.

Have i missed anything? Are there any major selling points I'm missing? Bear in mind we are generalists in our activities, by that I mean we are not focused on cycling but do a range of outdoors activities. That means this exercise is purely to maintain a healthy base level to make our activities easier. Fitter you are, within reason, the more you enjoy your varied activities IME. O used to have good endurance for walking which meant I spent less time chasing the rest of the group but had them chase me while I enjoyed the mountain views. It's this reason we need the indoor piece of kit.

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Paulatic
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Paulatic » 16 Nov 2015, 8:26am

Ive a turbo sitting in the shed, thankfully bought it 2nd hand, just used for setting up gears now. It's the most boring bit of kit imaginable.
I'd recommend a Pilates podcast and going for walks.
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beardy
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby beardy » 16 Nov 2015, 8:33am

If you are lucky enough to have enough space to use it, a skipping rope.

Used properly they are an excellent fitness aid.

Tangled Metal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 16 Nov 2015, 8:41am

Personally I can't get on with skipping ropes. I've never been able to keep it going beyond a couple of skips. I know they're supposed to be really good cardio workout and you can vary the way you do it as well but not for me. My partner got one but it only got used for a week and she got bored of it.

Jogging is an option since there's a decent linear route near us but after a history of knee problems I'm not sure I want to do much impact exercise. Walking at the weekend is enough. Come longer days we'll be walking most evenings though. Winter is always a bad time to get fit and stay fit i reckon.

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RickH
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby RickH » 16 Nov 2015, 2:46pm

There's always the option of studded tyres, decent lights, a decently waterproof jacket (breathability matters a bit less in winter I find) & wearing the right warmth of clothing for you and then just getting out there! :D Possibly no more expensive than a half decent exercise bike either.

Personally some of my favourite winter cycling has been snow & ice, in the dark and temperatures of around -6C - -10C. But then I may just be completely nuts! :lol:

Rick.

Tangled Metal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 16 Nov 2015, 3:31pm

Yep, you're nuts. Thing is I'm a little nuts like that too but my partner isn't. We need something for both of us unfortunately

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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Vorpal » 16 Nov 2015, 3:43pm

I've been known to put the kids to bed and leave Mr. V to hold down the fort while I go out for a bike ride, even on a winter evening :shock: :oops: :D :D
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whoof
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby whoof » 17 Nov 2015, 1:52pm

I used a turbo trainer for many years and it's a miserable way to spend your time. I only did it because I raced and if you want to get results you have to do the training. Even then I would only do short intense interval sessions there was no way I was going to sit on one for hours. If you do go down this route I would suggest that you get everything you need set up so that when you get home you just have to climb on it and start pedalling. Any form of distraction by having to pump up tyres, put the bike in the trainer, setting up a fan etc will probably mean you don't bother. I would also do a search for training for people with (very) limited time to get the most out of it.

You could try press-ups, sit-ups and possibly some light weights and some stretching . Takes very little or no special equipment and you can multi-task by doing it whilst watching the TV or listening to the radio.

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AlanW
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby AlanW » 17 Nov 2015, 2:10pm

IMHO Turbo trainers are only boring if you don't have a plan to follow. With the likes of TrainerRoad and more recently Zwift, turbo training is a great way to train when the conditions outside deteriorate.

Both these programs offer something different.

TrainerRoad has over 300 programs to choose from and specific objectives depending on what you want to get from your training indoors.

Zwift on the other hand, you enter into a virtual world of riding with people around the world with some great graphics. You can put in as much or as little effort as you want.
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David881
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby David881 » 17 Nov 2015, 8:29pm

A pair of running shoes, for when it's too dark, cold, wet to cycle safely and comfortably

Tangled Metal
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Re: Home exercise - what equipment?

Postby Tangled Metal » 18 Nov 2015, 8:12am

Can't run, only recently got knees back to working order. Non-load bearing only. Seriously my knee trouble really happened following a twist whilst on a climbing wall that got well and truly finished off by my one and only real attempt at getting fit by jogging. Lasted 6 runs which started off as 30 minutes run/walking and the last one ended up 90 minutes almost all running. A rapid improvement from someone who had always been convinced he could not run. I did however mess my knees up and one needed surgery.

Cycling is very good for knees I think. The consultant even told me to keep cycling while waiting for surgery. The motion of your knee whilst cycling keeps it loose and functioning. I tend to agree because I took a week off commuting thinking I was giving my own knee a good rest. It was a very painful week. The next week ok cycled 4 days and 5 minutes into the first ride my knee pain went for the whole week until the Friday when I b drove in.

My point.being for supplementary exercise for cycling and other activities I feel I need low impact exercise hence the machine being needed.