Energy bars and energy fluids

mnichols
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby mnichols » 8 Nov 2017, 2:40pm

mjr wrote:So why do you use that to justify fat but not bread which has also been consumed for tens of thousands of years?


There was a book written about it called Wheat Belly, the hypothesis is that bread has changed, or rather wheat has changed. pre 1970's we used a wheat that we had used for thousands of years, but it was low yielding and susceptible to drought, disease and pests. So around that time 'better' wheat was introduced. It was genetically modified before we knew what that was. It's the new wheat that causes the problem. It is now very difficult to find the old wheat.

The book postulates a correlation between the introduction of this new wheat and the rise of obesity and many other health problems that have increased rapidly in the same time frame

He also suggests a correlation between this new wheat and the rapid rise in people that believe they are gluten sensitive or intolerant

I read the book. I'm not a scientist or doctor, but he makes a good case

It's become something of a band wagon and industry but the original book was very good - I actually emailed the author with a few questions and he responded. It's now become an industry and probably lost it's way a bit, but if you can see beyond that and read the original book its worth the time

ianrobo
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby ianrobo » 8 Nov 2017, 8:20pm

mjr wrote:
And yes, some things are labelled "low fat" while abusing processed sugar, but others are labelled "low carb" and stuffed with sweetener chemicals or cheap processed fats. Check for poisons carefully...


thats why most people on LCHF will eat only real food and not processed rubbish which is stuffed full of crap.

I back up totally what Keith said, best example for me was doing the velothon, did it around 5.55 and so much faster than others I know who were better but they had to stop to fill up on food I just carried on cycling and just needed water topping up a couple of mins thats all.

As for you said evidence of those that do, well work from Chris Froome to a lot or pro triathletes plus many others who have 'changed their diets' but never quite have the the confidence to say LCHF.

I will definitely give you one - Romain BArdet who trains with Peter Defty - google it.

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SmilerGB
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby SmilerGB » 17 Dec 2017, 5:35pm

I’m partial to the sis energy go powder, add to your water helps with a constant supply of carbs & electrolytes throughout your ride if I need anything else more substantial I grab it at the coffee stop.
The bicycle is a simple solution to some of the world's most complicated problems.

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Heltor Chasca
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby Heltor Chasca » 17 Dec 2017, 5:57pm

I have recently tried ‘Tailwind’ through a friend who does long distance trail running. I used it on a recent 200km Audax and I was very impressed. So much so, I’m ditching my zero electrolyte tabs in favour of this stuff.

Still not convinced by any of the ‘sports bars’ and the likes in favour of normal food. But: Never say never.

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Sweep
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby Sweep » 17 Dec 2017, 6:18pm

SmilerGB wrote:I’m partial to the sis energy go powder, add to your water helps with a constant supply of carbs & electrolytes throughout your ride if I need anything else more substantial I grab it at the coffee stop.

Yes i used to use that on the long tough rides i used to do. Decent stuff, even if these days I use zero tabs and my own home made energy bars.
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Vorpal
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby Vorpal » 17 Dec 2017, 6:32pm

mnichols wrote: So around that time 'better' wheat was introduced. It was genetically modified before we knew what that was. It's the new wheat that causes the problem. It is now very difficult to find the old wheat.

The book postulates a correlation between the introduction of this new wheat and the rise of obesity and many other health problems that have increased rapidly in the same time frame
People have been genertically modifying wheat for thousands of years. It's called selective breeding. And the wheat grown and used in the UK is much closer to 'old' wheat than that used in many other countries. The reason for that is that the climate is slightly different, and the wheat bred in the UK is still the wheat that grows best in the UK. Large bakeries heavily supplement it with imported wheat though, because it rises more easily.
mnichols wrote:He also suggests a correlation between this new wheat and the rapid rise in people that believe they are gluten sensitive or intolerant

I read the book. I'm not a scientist or doctor, but he makes a good case

Gluten sensitivity is fashionable. It's also considered a cure for many ills by 'health food' proponents. The combination of awareness of gluten intolerance, and the fashion of going gluten free is bound to create a rapid rise in people believing they are gluten sensitive. Those who are intolerant lack the enzyme to digest it. It is hereditary, and there is plenty of scientific evidence about which populations it is the most predominant in, how it is handed down, and what proportions of the population are/have been genetically intolerant.

Mini V is lactose intolerant and also has some yet undetermined allergies. She's been tested for genetic gluten intolerance, and also tried going gluten free. It hasn't helped. Yet, it is the very first thing that most people ask us, when we explain that she has some food intolerance/allergy issues. "Have you tried gluten free?" "Are you sure it's not gluten?" Even after I have I explained that we are certain it's not gluten because she's been tested and we tried gluten free, people will still say, "Are you sure? Maybe you haven't been completely gluten free. Did you go with gluten free oats and all of that?"
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hemo
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby hemo » 17 Dec 2017, 10:26pm

Drink wise it is bottle of water and a zero tab, I try and buy them on offer.
Food wise a sandwich and fruit esp ready to eat squidgy apricots and prunes.

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Sweep
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby Sweep » 17 Dec 2017, 11:13pm

really must get round to posting my energy snack recipe but in the meantime, for simple to hand energy when touring I can recommend keeping a plastic jar of peanut butter in your panniers. With some bread, sourceable pretty much anywhere, you are sorted for basic energy needs. Top it up with Lidl wine guns and shots of espresso from a carried bialettti.
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Annoying Twit
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby Annoying Twit » 20 Dec 2017, 8:13am

I just eat regular food. But then I'm not competing, just going long distance. Fruit and nut bars. Chocolate. Nuts. Salad and hummous wraps. Etc. I used to really like the coconut smoothie that ASDA sold in cartons, but they changed the recipe. I found it really palatable and about 700kcal per box.

mnichols
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby mnichols » 20 Dec 2017, 6:02pm

The banana bars at Aldi are very good. The only two ingredients are banana and apple - nothing else.

They are small, tasty, cheap and (probably) healthy. I find them more convenient to carry than bananas

mattsccm
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby mattsccm » 23 Dec 2017, 8:47pm

What ever biccies or munchies I can find in a cupboard will do although I take nothing for sub 50 milers. The bonk won't harm you!
Longer rides may see me hit a shop and then its most volume for least money. Ideally meat based. If it all falls apart I look for a can of pop.
It is recreational cycling not the TdF.

brynpoeth
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Re: Energy bars and energy fluids

Postby brynpoeth » 23 Dec 2017, 9:37pm

mattsccm wrote:What ever biccies or munchies I can find in a cupboard will do although I take nothing for sub 50 milers. The bonk won't harm you!
Longer rides may see me hit a shop and then its most volume for least money. Ideally meat based. If it all falls apart I look for a can of pop.
It is recreatiornal cycling not the TdF.


*The bonk won't harm you*

I beg to differ m'lud! :wink:
Bonk, knock, sags, a packet, the wall .. we have several names for it
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