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Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 24 Mar 2019, 4:55pm
by Cugel
Oldchap,

Surely anyone reading the post will understand that there are two types of diabetes and that the over-indulgence in sugary fud (nearly all of that which is "processed") is associated with only one kind of diabetes. This is common knowledge now.

Meanwhile, perhaps you might organise your replying process as there seems to be a glitch causing strange and confusing effects. Everyone and his dog knows not just about the two types of diabetes but also how to reply to CUK forum post inclusive of a quote. :-)

Cugel

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 24 Mar 2019, 7:19pm
by oldmanonabike
Cugel wrote:Oldchap,

Surely anyone reading the post will understand that there are two types of diabetes and that the over-indulgence in sugary fud (nearly all of that which is "processed") is associated with only one kind of diabetes. This is common knowledge now.

Meanwhile, perhaps you might organise your replying process as there seems to be a glitch causing strange and confusing effects. Everyone and his dog knows not just about the two types of diabetes but also how to reply to CUK forum post inclusive of a quote. :-)
Cugel


Sorry I'm far to busy trying to work out what Fud is I thought it was about bitcoin
Shock horror check urban dictionary for their definition

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 24 Mar 2019, 7:22pm
by fastpedaller
Ray wrote:
Audax67 wrote:Not even my raincoat is beige.

I didn't realise people still wore raincoats :wink:

Nobody wears them any more because of global warming 8)

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 24 Mar 2019, 10:11pm
by nez
avalonian wrote:I don't own any beige clothing and I am over 60.

Me too - long past 60. I wear black.

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 24 Mar 2019, 11:00pm
by thelawnet
ANTONISH wrote:Incidentally I can see plenty of obese persons locally in Kent - no need to travel to Tyneside.
Also sixty isn't elderly.


Well indeed.

I visited Ashford (Kent), once. We were looking at houses.

I was struck by the different sort of person you get in Ashford compared to say Guildford, and the various implications of this. (Mostly that there are lots of people in Ashford who are neither rich nor healthy, and not so many, relatively, in Guildford.)

(Of course Guildford at 10pm on Saturday night is unpleasant as is anywhere else, however the feel on a say Tuesday lunchtime is quite different between the two.)

Slightly more on topic, I headed out today for a ride and bumped into a couple of chaps probably in their 30s. Slightly tubby looking (though not any more than me). Where are you going? 'Train station, just did the "spring onion" sportive. Around the Surrey Hills'.

Hmm, ok.

Anyway I got back home and looked up their ride. £22.50 for 65 miles. I did 61 miles for free (ok, I purchased some sugary liquid in Haslemere from a nice man who asked me if I liked cricket (he was Indian and was watching the Indian bish-bash-bosh league on his phone)), and the same amount of climbing.

So that's a digression, but the tubby chaps doing the sportive I think had come quite far as they were heading to Woking station whereas the ride started in Cobham, there seems to be a thing of 'event' cycling in that some people doing these things perhaps only ride once in a blue moon. Whereas the 'ageing cyclists' who are retired and do two or three such runs a week, are much fitter.

The extreme version of this is the London - Brighton ride, which is a rather unpleasant affair designed for people who don't like cycling and designed to confirm that prejudice.

I am sure cycling must be very good for the heart and other organs, in that mine was pumping at a good rate for 4 hours and this must be better than most other forms of exercise. Especially if it is regular exercise and not just something done once a year as an 'event'.

So in the end you get some very fit 70 year olds who are much fitter and stronger than the average 25 year old. (Although from what I can see there's a decent chance of a regular 70 year old cyclist having a heart attack during a ride, and not a very good chance of an irregular 25 year old doing the same.)

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 6:39am
by brynpoeth
Minus One for London-Brighton, TTC, the tragedy of train-cycling

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 7:01am
by ianrobo
brynpoeth wrote:Minus One for London-Brighton, TTC, the tragedy of train-cycling


I have heard some real bad stories about that but it is an ‘event’ that like Ride London many thousands feel they have to do ... meanwhile I pump out 200km a week simply on my commute

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 9:19am
by foxyrider
brynpoeth wrote:Minus One for London-Brighton, TTC, the tragedy of train-cycling


Nothing wrong with train cycling - I do it from time to time - let's me explore countryside that bit further from home.

Those guys and the sportive - be glad they chose the train not a car to make the trip. The 'can ride that route/roads for free' seems to be the clarion call of solitary curmudgeons on here! Some folk are more time pressed, less experienced, less confident, enjoy the atmosphere and sportives can be the driving force behind their riding. I ride a few, generally out of my usual riding zone, they make a pleasant change to the solitary mile munching I normally do (@400km most weeks).
L to B doesn't appeal to me but completing it, for non 'lifestyle' riders, is an achievement which they have volunteered for. Next month I travel to Germany where i'll take part in a sports festival, the majority of participants aren't dedicated sports people. In the cycling forum the events start with the 2km toddlers event and go up to the 200km event i'm taking part in. The prize for everyone is purely the taking part, enjoying the countryside on whatever bike you have from carbon race bikes to cargo bikes and everywhere in between. There will be something like 5000 cyclists taking part, 15000 'athletes' over the weekend (there are running, walking and canoeing events too) and they'll all have smiles on their faces. Most live locally to the event, I will most certainly travel furthest to get there but I do so because I enjoy the event, the atmosphere and the chance to ride some different roads.
Beyond the children's events there is no mention of age, everyone is treated the same, well the kids are encouraged very vocally. Age just isn't a thing.

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 9:49am
by Scunnered
thelawnet wrote:So that's a digression, but the tubby chaps doing the sportive I think had come quite far as they were heading to Woking station whereas the ride started in Cobham, there seems to be a thing of 'event' cycling in that some people doing these things perhaps only ride once in a blue moon. Whereas the 'ageing cyclists' who are retired and do two or three such runs a week, are much fitter.


+1 to the young tubby chaps who were possibly doing something outside their comfort zone and +1 for taking the train

-1 for the grumpy retired folks, no matter how fit, many of whom benefit from final salary pension schemes and MIRAS

+1 to the young tubby chaps paying taxes to fund the national debt bolstered by those above and who will never benefit from either

Re: cycliing and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 12:28pm
by thelawnet
foxyrider wrote:Those guys and the sportive - be glad they chose the train not a car to make the trip. The 'can ride that route/roads for free' seems to be the clarion call of solitary curmudgeons on here! Some folk are more time pressed, less experienced, less confident, enjoy the atmosphere and sportives can be the driving force behind their riding. I ride a few, generally out of my usual riding zone, they make a pleasant change to the solitary mile munching I normally do (@400km most weeks).


My point was not that taking a train to a sportive and then riding it is somehow bad, but rather that if you only take part in 'events' then you aren't going to be as fit as the retired people who treat cycling as an everyday activity.

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 12:32pm
by ianrobo
To most audaxes I have to drive is that wrong ?

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 2:14pm
by Audax67
Yeah, that's a thing. For years in Alsace we have had a 'League Challenge' in which you get points for taking part in events: club events get 5 points, local FFCT committee events 20 points, and things like the Semaine Fédérale get 30. Every year there's a slew of medals slung round and someone gets a pot for the most points.

I used to chase points with the rest until I realized that the challenge was really handing out rewards for pollution. Some folk would do 200 km round trips, do a 25 km circuit, collect their 20 points and descend on the barbecue like starving rats, so that it was common for the folk doing 100+ km to come back to a bare table. Nowadays I mostly do just the events I can ride to.

Were I chasing PBP qualification I'd drive, though. BRM are not all that common.

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 3:19pm
by charliepolecat
I normally do (@400km most weeks).


Impressive!

To most audaxes I have to drive is that wrong ?


Me too, but I do like to keep to the maxxim that I shouldn't drive further than the ride is long - it doesn't always work that way but if I have to drive 160 miles I want to be sure I'm doing at least a 300K. I have loads of perms of 200K closer to my home.

Training for the Inverness 1200.

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 4:54pm
by ianrobo
Problem is for me here in Brum very few actual audaxes are close by and the one or two that are I obviously ride to them

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 8:27pm
by brynpoeth
I considered participating in TTC, the tragedy of train-cycling Saturday, but I cycled all the way home instead, I was really exhausted when I got back but I 'saved' the fare, just only cycling is almost always better except in special circumstances (weather, sickness)

There is already far too much motor traffic (anyone disagree?), I am willing to 'suffer' to avoid driving or going by train. To drive a long way to cycle a longer way seems a bit strange, cyclists adding to motor traffic, Minus One