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Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 27 Mar 2019, 8:53am
by peterb
Driving to the start of the weekly club-run doesn't bother me - selfish perhaps, but I've had to give up on riding my conventional bikes due to health issues and now use an e-road bike. I haven't got the range. If I didn't drive I wouldn't be able to take part. Full stop.
I always compare it to the runner taking part in an event - no one expects them to run to the start, compete, and then run home again, do they?

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 4:04am
by brynpoeth
Lots of joggers drive to the park to jog, although they could jog there quickly and easily
Near me there is a dog monopoly (lead-free) wood, the car park is often quite full
Minus Two

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 8:43am
by foxyrider
A friends adult son goes to the gym every day by car - it's less than half a mile away, you can nearly see it from the house. Suggest he walks and you get a 'you can't be serious' look.

Well i'm off on the bike for a few hours, no trains, planes or automobiles!

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 9:11am
by Sweep
foxyrider wrote:A friends adult son goes to the gym every day by car - it's less than half a mile away, you can nearly see it from the house. Suggest he walks and you get a 'you can't be serious' look.

s!


Is this the gym?

https://images.app.goo.gl/ffHQxJFDHwT83X2r8

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 9:36am
by peterb
brynpoeth wrote:Lots of joggers drive to the park to jog, although they could jog there quickly and easily
Near me there is a dog monopoly (lead-free) wood, the car park is often quite full
Minus Two


Doesn't it depend on how far away the event is?
However, I attend a fitness class in my village - I walk, about 600 yards (to just about my pain threshold, I have PAD). I'm amazed how many others find it necessary to drive down the village street to get there. Others drive in from surrounding villages (no public transport).

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 9:43am
by Tiberius
foxyrider wrote:A friends adult son goes to the gym every day by car - it's less than half a mile away, you can nearly see it from the house. Suggest he walks and you get a 'you can't be serious' look. !


Just like my mate. He drives to the gym (one mile) and then gets straight onto a walking machine !....I've asked him why he doesn't just walk to the gym ? He says that he prefers to walk on a walking machine because he can watch the telly at the same time !!!..... :?

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 1:20pm
by charliepolecat
He drives to the gym (one mile) and then gets straight onto a walking machine


It's the same with people who use my gym and take the lift to the first floor then get on the treadmill or stair climbing machine.

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 1:36pm
by nez
someone pointed out to me I don't use the warm down bikes at the gym. 'I cycle home,' I said.

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
by flat tyre
Huge car park outside our local gym, always full, bike parking for about a dozen bicycles, usually 3 or 4 bikes there!

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 7:46pm
by brynpoeth
How sickening, gym membership co$ts a lot too, it's the economy stupid
But.. could a gym be a good place to meet new people, particularly a new partner? :?

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 8:31pm
by charliepolecat
But.. could a gym be a good place to meet new people, particularly a new partner?


Well, if you are desperate. :oops:

Re: cycling and ageing

Posted: 28 Mar 2019, 8:52pm
by nez
brynpoeth wrote:How sickening, gym membership co$ts a lot too, it's the economy stupid
But.. could a gym be a good place to meet new people, particularly a new partner? :?


Since most people wear earphones and listen to music (or in my case podcasts) it's difficult to see how that would work. Maybe if you were issued with slate and chalk on the way in...