Health Service professionals

Oldjohnw
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Health Service professionals

Postby Oldjohnw » 17 Jun 2019, 3:38pm

Following a recent blood test which Gond that my sugar levels were elevated I visited this morning a pre-diabetes clinic and was advised by a NHS fitness and diet trainer.

The lady was significantly obese. Most of the nurses in my practice and some of the doctors are, too.
John

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ANTONISH
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby ANTONISH » 18 Jun 2019, 4:58pm

You are not alone in being advised about obesity by someone markedly obese - especially when they are using BMI as an exact measure (my BMI was a fraction over 25 at the time.)
Health professionals don't all have healthy life styles - e.g heavy smoking and drinking IME are not unusual.

Perhaps there's a degree of fatalism involved.

landsurfer
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby landsurfer » 18 Jun 2019, 5:40pm

Some years ago i was shown into an appointment with a morbidly obese physiotherapist.
I politely excused myself and on the way out I told reception that i would have been better giving her advice, in a cheerful tone .....
Both receptionists smiled .......
I cycled off home and sorted myself out using the power of the internet ... as you do ...
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mjr
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby mjr » 18 Jun 2019, 5:41pm

Just because they don't do as they say, it doesn't necessarily mean that what they're saying is wrong.
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random37
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby random37 » 18 Jun 2019, 5:51pm

When I was overweight, I had the displeasure of dealing with a member of the Live Life Better (Derbyshire) team. She was average weight.

She read a script to me and told me "that I had to start drinking milk, or I'd get rickets". I was 140kg at the time.

Six months later, after I'd started sorting it out myself, she phoned and asked how I was. Not that she cared. She wanted to take me off their books, but to do that she needed me to answer a questionnaire that said I wasn't suffering from depression or was likely to kill myself. She told me this, after a bit of cajoling.

Oldjohnw
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby Oldjohnw » 18 Jun 2019, 8:23pm

I'm not actually overweight at 70kg and I cycle 100km per week but my sugar levels are elevated. If I had been overweight I might have been pretty annoyed.
John

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cotswolds
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby cotswolds » 19 Jun 2019, 9:40pm

My partner did some career change training which included some modules with nurses and physios on first degree courses.

She said nearly all the nurses were obese (and we're talking people aged around 20, not older people with middle aged spread gone too far).

The physios were all fit and healthy sporty types in tracksuits. You really could tell what course people were on just by looking at them.

whoof
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby whoof » 22 Jun 2019, 6:33pm

My father was a builder. He did hundreds of extensions, loft conversions, knocking through kitchen diners and did them very well. He moved into his house in 1960 and didn't do any more DIY than hang a picture on the wall.

softlips
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby softlips » 23 Jun 2019, 7:28am

cotswolds wrote:The physios were all fit and healthy sporty types in tracksuits. You really could tell what course people were on just by looking at them.



It was like that to a certain extent when I trained in the 80’s. Brings back memories of me chasing one physio for a date who was way out of my league. Everyone was talking about the grin on my face when she finally walked onto the ward and put her phone number in my hand.

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pjclinch
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby pjclinch » 23 Jun 2019, 10:14am

Oldjohnw wrote:Following a recent blood test which Gond that my sugar levels were elevated I visited this morning a pre-diabetes clinic and was advised by a NHS fitness and diet trainer.

The lady was significantly obese. Most of the nurses in my practice and some of the doctors are, too.


As the old joke goes, "those who can't do, teach".

As the other old joke goes, "do as I say, not as I do".

I work for The Firm, and some of my colleagues are overweight (some dramatically so), some smoke, some take very little exercise. But it doesn't mean they can't do their jobs to help other people.

If you'd happily listen to advice from someone thinner, even if it was exactly the same advice, then I think this is quite possibly a variant of blaming the messenger.

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pjclinch
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby pjclinch » 23 Jun 2019, 10:16am

mjr wrote:Just because they don't do as they say, it doesn't necessarily mean that what they're saying is wrong.


Exactly. No great shortage of doctors that smoke. Very much a shortage of doctors who'll tell you smoking isn't a problem.
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brynpoeth
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby brynpoeth » 23 Jun 2019, 10:21am

pjclinch wrote:
mjr wrote:Just because they don't do as they say, it doesn't necessarily mean that what they're saying is wrong.


Exactly. No great shortage of doctors that smoke. Very much a shortage of doctors who'll tell you smoking isn't a problem.

Do a lot of doctors smoke now, more or less than in the general population?
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Cunobelin
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby Cunobelin » 23 Jun 2019, 10:30am

Long hours, long gaps between breaks, tired and emotionally drained at the end of the shift



Hardly assists with healthy eating and exercise....

Oldjohnw
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby Oldjohnw » 23 Jun 2019, 1:32pm

pjclinch wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:Following a recent blood test which Gond that my sugar levels were elevated I visited this morning a pre-diabetes clinic and was advised by a NHS fitness and diet trainer.

The lady was significantly obese. Most of the nurses in my practice and some of the doctors are, too.


As the old joke goes, "those who can't do, teach".

As the other old joke goes, "do as I say, not as I do".

I work for The Firm, and some of my colleagues are overweight (some dramatically so), some smoke, some take very little exercise. But it doesn't mean they can't do their jobs to help other people.

If you'd happily listen to advice from someone thinner, even if it was exactly the same advice, then I think this is quite possibly a variant of blaming the messenger.
Pete.


I listen to the advice, but it is concerning when the trainer disregards her own advice. And she works 9-5 so not long unsocial hours.
John

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pjclinch
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby pjclinch » 23 Jun 2019, 3:48pm

Oldjohnw wrote:
I listen to the advice, but it is concerning when the trainer disregards her own advice. And she works 9-5 so not long unsocial hours.


I'm not an epidemiologist and don't rate as any sort of expert on psychology, but I don't think I'm pushing the boat too far out if I suggest there are possibly more contributing factors in taking poor personal health decisions than the length of the working week.

Pete.
Last edited by pjclinch on 23 Jun 2019, 3:56pm, edited 1 time in total.
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