Health Service professionals

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pjclinch
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby pjclinch » 23 Jun 2019, 3:56pm

brynpoeth wrote:Do a lot of doctors smoke now, more or less than in the general population?


I don't have figures, but amongst folk with that level of education, so much of which tells you in excruciating detail what a health-disaster smoking is (not to mention the cost), it's amazing anyone's doing it at all... unless there is more to self control than "just say no".

Pete.
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Oldjohnw
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby Oldjohnw » 23 Jun 2019, 4:32pm

pjclinch wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:
I listen to the advice, but it is concerning when the trainer disregards her own advice. And she works 9-5 so not long unsocial hours.


I'm not an epidemiologist and don't rate as any sort of expert on psychology, but I don't think I'm pushing the boat too far out if I suggest there are possibly more contributing factors in taking poor personal health decisions than the length of the working week.
X
Pete.


I agree, but someone had earlier suggested that: post now gone.
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ThePinkOne
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby ThePinkOne » 23 Jun 2019, 5:03pm

Cunobelin wrote:Long hours, long gaps between breaks, tired and emotionally drained at the end of the shift



Hardly assists with healthy eating and exercise....


Indeed. Add in the night shifts (which can play havoc with metabolism).... maybe a few other things. Stress for example- tends to increase cortisol. A nurse who cares (so trying to do her best in a dysfunctional system) working long shifts + overtime on a poor shift pattern in an underfunded, constantly "re-organised" system where if she makes a mistake she will be blamed will most likely have had chronic stress for at least a significant part of their working life. Plus in many parts of the country, she'll be going home to a place where she struggles to afford the rent and has little home security as private landlords (the buy-to-let generation) want to make as much money as they can.

Being overweight is the new acceptable form of discrimination, "us and them." Interestingly, the biggest correlations with weight are income/class.....

I suppose if a(n acceptably thin i.e. anorexic-looking if female) medic who was very stressed told someone to de-stress they would be equally criticised?

TPO

PS. I recommend reading Angry Chef's 2 books with an open mind. Then reflecting on the way you have or have not been effected by the bias of the current media/corporate norms........

random37
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby random37 » 23 Jun 2019, 6:46pm

landsurfer wrote:Both receptionists smiled .......

It's not necessarily the same thing you think they were smiling at. I suspect neither of them would know how to react to what you said, and were just hoping you'd go away.
landsurfer wrote:I cycled off home and sorted myself out using the power of the internet ... as you do ...

Yes. As anyone will tell you, nothing on the Internet is ever wrong.

irc
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby irc » 23 Jun 2019, 6:47pm

brynpoeth wrote:
pjclinch wrote:
mjr wrote:Just because they don't do as they say, it doesn't necessarily mean that what they're saying is wrong.


Exactly. No great shortage of doctors that smoke. Very much a shortage of doctors who'll tell you smoking isn't a problem.

Do a lot of doctors smoke now, more or less than in the general population?



I would have said no. I worked (as a driver) with a random selection of GPs in my part time job. Perhaps 30 or 40 different doctors. I can only recall two smokers. In another part time job I visited many different hospitals, both wards and out patient depts. Can't say I noticed any more obese nurses than in the general population either.

softlips
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby softlips » 23 Jun 2019, 7:09pm

I work with cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Not that many smoke to be honest. It always surprises me when they do.

landsurfer
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby landsurfer » 23 Jun 2019, 7:09pm

I'm slightly baffled .... if the medical profession is so bl**dy awful, underpaid, under-resourced, and a nightmare to be taking part in .... why are so many working so hard at Uni ... in medical school ... Nursing training ... etc. to be part of it ......
Everyone is so altruistic ? ... or do the 18 -19 plate Mercs and SUV's parked in the "Doctors Only" parking at Rotherham General tell a different story ?
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Cunobelin
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby Cunobelin » 23 Jun 2019, 7:29pm

Oldjohnw wrote:
pjclinch wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:Following a recent blood test which Gond that my sugar levels were elevated I visited this morning a pre-diabetes clinic and was advised by a NHS fitness and diet trainer.

The lady was significantly obese. Most of the nurses in my practice and some of the doctors are, too.


As the old joke goes, "those who can't do, teach".

As the other old joke goes, "do as I say, not as I do".

I work for The Firm, and some of my colleagues are overweight (some dramatically so), some smoke, some take very little exercise. But it doesn't mean they can't do their jobs to help other people.

If you'd happily listen to advice from someone thinner, even if it was exactly the same advice, then I think this is quite possibly a variant of blaming the messenger.
Pete.


I listen to the advice, but it is concerning when the trainer disregards her own advice. And she works 9-5 so not long unsocial hours.


So do I (allegedly) yet last week alone saw three early starts at 07:30 and three kate nights including one twelve hour day

All you need is a late patient, transport booking problems and 9-5 is a dream

brynpoeth
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby brynpoeth » 23 Jun 2019, 7:35pm

What about legislation limiting working hours?
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landsurfer
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby landsurfer » 23 Jun 2019, 7:55pm

We are already limited by law to a maximum of 12 hours a day, 13 days out of 14 etc. Driving time to site is included, even if your not driving and are enjoying a kip ... But in reality we rarely work more that 4 days in 7 ...and stop in nice hotels with good allowances for meals / subsistence ... Shame not all industries are as well legislated.
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The Road Goes On Forever ........................

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pjclinch
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby pjclinch » 24 Jun 2019, 9:47am

landsurfer wrote:I'm slightly baffled .... if the medical profession is so bl**dy awful, underpaid, under-resourced, and a nightmare to be taking part in .... why are so many working so hard at Uni ... in medical school ... Nursing training ... etc. to be part of it ......
Everyone is so altruistic ? ... or do the 18 -19 plate Mercs and SUV's parked in the "Doctors Only" parking at Rotherham General tell a different story ?


At the junior end of the pile, I would recommend you read This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay.

You can rise through that to be a consultant which in gross terms is well paid, but had you witnessed the bombastic levels of care from all levels of doctor right up to the top on tap 24/7 when my son's hydrocephalus shunt was blocking up I don't think you'd come away thinking about gravy trains.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

softlips
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby softlips » 24 Jun 2019, 1:07pm

brynpoeth wrote:What about legislation limiting working hours?


I work for a medical company and as part of your contract you sign to waive the working hours directive rules.

fullupandslowingdown
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Re: Health Service professionals

Postby fullupandslowingdown » 30 Jun 2019, 11:28am

The USDA Food Pyramid allegedly was first devised by an office worker wanting a graphic to go with an article he was writing designed to promote the consumption of maize food products. He was tasked with this by a boss who was responding to concerns by maize growers who having followed the latest advice to improve crop yields, were now facing a glut of maize threatening to collapse the commodity price of maize, and hence ruin for the farmers.
However history has a curious habit of being reinvented, and now the americans are blaming the Swiss for inventing this nonsense, and then exporting it to the USA. But thats the problem with the internet, facts can be changed as often as trump blows wind.
There was absolutely no medical science to back up the food pyramid recommendations of high carb consumption. In fact most studies have always shown that excessive carb intake is bad for us, and does contribute to diseases like diabetes.