Dupuytren's contracture

Tangled Metal
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Tangled Metal » 9 Nov 2020, 9:39pm

Mick F wrote:Correct me if I'm wrong here .........
Generalising too ...........

The British Isles were and have been and will always be, a magnet for immigrants.
Angles and Saxons from Europe and Celts from southern Europe came in, and the Scots from Ireland, and the Norse from Scandinavia.

The Norse came down the western side of present-day Scotland and down the western side of present-day England including Isle of Man of course.

It's very possible that anyone from the NW of UK will have some "Viking" blood in them to a greater or lesser degree.

In n another forum I saw a link to or a map of where the Vikings went. IIRC Scotland, Northern England and down the East coast but Wales, SW and most of Western England not so much. I think it was described that Vikings tended to move into areas of marginal land not really occupied by others. They weren't the pillagers but more settlers of land not occupied then spread out. Stands to reason that you'd fight more for the good land but not the marginal land.

Btw Vikings weren't the all powerful fighters portrayed. Evidence is man for man they're strong fighters but not organised, more skirmishers. That's why when Viking raids were detected the Anglo Saxons went and burned their ships. That tactic put paid to a lot of Viking raiding where they hit and run back to their boats. There's also evidence that they were not good fighters against organised fighters. A good Anglo Saxon shield wall won many a battle with Vikings I've heard.

So whilst they did get around they're not as big an influence on us than say the people from parts if Northern Germany. Viking blood isn't that common except in certain areas. It's why I'm surprised you've got that supposedly Viking indicator. I hope you get it sorted out. Perhaps get referred to Furness general and have a Cumbrian holiday testing your Moulton and Mercian out on Lakeland passes. Then let me know if they're harder than Cornish hills. :)

Btw did you by know that English is considered a Creole language because it has absorbed so much from other languages. Another random piece of information I've picked up by osmosis!!!

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Mick F
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Mick F » 10 Nov 2020, 11:05am

Called in at the (ill)Health Centre yesterday afternoon to book a Doctor's appointment, only to be told I can only do it by phone 08:30 to 10:00 and a doctor will phone me, rather than going in. He/she will ask to see me if he/she thinks he/she should.

Got on the blower at 09:00 this morning, and listened for a few minutes to the Virus info etc, then was given a choice of buttons to press, or hang on for a receptionist. I hung on.

Mindless music.

"You are second in the queue."

Mindless music.

"You are second in the queue."

Mindless music.

"You are first in the queue."

Mindless music.

Mindless music.

Mindless music.

Mindless music.

"You are next in the queue."

Mindless music.
Mindless music.
Mindless music.
Mindless music.
Mindless music.
Mindless music.
Mindless music.

It was now 09:20, so I hung up, got in the car, drove to the (ill)Health Centre, walked straight in, and spoke to the receptionist face to face.

I was in there no more than three minutes chatting to her, and the doctor is going to phone me after 3pm this afternoon.
Mick F. Cornwall

thirdcrank
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby thirdcrank » 10 Nov 2020, 11:21am

I do hope you get this sorted out.

There's a letter in this morning's Daily T suggesting that any doctor who's annoyed by current perceptions about the GP service should try ringing their own surgery.

Touch wood, I've had little need for healthcare this year, though none of my regular check-ups eg diabetes has been carried out.

Re the telephone, try ringing the doc on behalf of someone else; in my case this was because my wife's earwax was so bad she couldn't use a phone.

delilah
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby delilah » 10 Nov 2020, 3:26pm

Mick I have this condition but its not as far advanced as yours. At the moment it is not hindering my cycling or playing golf (that has always been bad!) Mainly cosmetic
I think I've been able to slow down the spread of this ailment by trying to massage and stretch out my fingers and back of the hand. I usually find this helps to stretch out the tendons a little although yours appears to have gone too far for this.
I am not considering surgery at the moment as I have heard that the condition can return so I am waiting until it get worse, but not as bad as yours.

So you have my sympathy 1. for the condition and 2. for the lousy service given to you by your doctors surgery. Very much the same up here . The surgery is virtually closed and there's a wall built around the doctors by the receptionist ( and they're going to be given another £150 million for the vaccination scheme) We couldn't get in to get in for our flu jabs we had to go to the pharmacist!

Please keep posting and let us know how you go on as I'm sure a lot of us will be interested.

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Mick F
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Mick F » 10 Nov 2020, 4:36pm

Yes, I'll still keep posting! :D

No phone call as yet.
Now 25 to 5. Dunno what time they shut up shop with respect to phone calls from the doc.
The surgery closes at 6pm.

I don't even know which doctor will phone ............ the witch doctor? :lol:
Mick F. Cornwall

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philg
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby philg » 10 Nov 2020, 5:04pm

simonineaston wrote:
anyone from the NW of UK will have some "Viking" blood in them
...and not just north-west - all over the place, I imagine, by now.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_h ... es#Vikings

I was surprised to learn from a recent TV doc that The Normans were Vikings too

<They were originally Vikings from Scandinavia. (The name Normandy comes from the French normand, meaning Norsemen and Normans)>

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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby PDQ Mobile » 10 Nov 2020, 5:42pm

delilah wrote:and 2. for the lousy service given to you by your doctors surgery. Very much the same up here . The surgery is virtually closed and there's a wall built around the doctors by the receptionist ( and they're going to be given another £150 million for the vaccination scheme) We couldn't get in to get in for our flu jabs we had to go to the pharmacist!

Please keep posting and let us know how you go on as I'm sure a lot of us will be interested.

Hang on.
Let's get this right.

The OP wanted an appointment to discuss a long standing ailment.
It was specifically stated on an earlier personal visit by the OP to the surgery that, because of Covid, the making of telephone appointments is highly preferred.
Mornings are always busier on such a system because ... well obvious really.

So OP phones up and is put in a telephone queue which informs one about the position in said queue.
OP states there are a selection of options, presumably including ones designed for emergencies.

Some appointment inquiries once connected take longer than others at my local surgery because the receptionist tries to find the most appropriate professional by asking questions. That is stated.


Now the OP, just as he is reaches "next in the queue" on the telephone, loses patience and drives, I don't know how far, to surgery.
Enters surgery, with its attendant Covid risk to all parties (mask?) and personally makes telephone appointment for doctor to phone him on same day.
Drives home again, dunno how far.

Given the strain through Covid on all Health Professionals a same day appointment seems pretty good to me.

Now I understand that such an appointment can run late because of the indeterminate nature of a string of such appointments.
It is also possible that a person so obviously impatient (no pun etc) will be "eased" back in the queue.
To last maybe!

Had the OP just made a brew while initially waiting and made a telephone appointment through the correct procedure, it is very possible he would have had an answer before he even got into the car to drive to the surgery!!

So I don't see this criticism of his Doctor's practice as justified.

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Mick F
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Mick F » 10 Nov 2020, 6:51pm

You've summed it up ok but not knowing where we live with respect to the village or me personally.

I'm an impatient sort of guy, and a person who likes to see people rather than speaking on the phone.
The Heath Centre is about 20mins walk from here, and half that by bike, and just as quick by car. Free parking for under an hour.
I knew full well that I could speak in person much more easily than using the phone, but I gave it a chance.
I could have arrived in the village and found a queue outside ............. one out, one in, wear a mask, clean your hands, keep your distance ............... but I would be happier to wait outside and socialise for half an hour than to be on the phone for half an hour.

All I needed was to register the fact that I wanted the doctor to phone me.
It could have all been done by email perhaps, but that option isn't available to my knowledge. Perhaps it is?

Any road up, the doc phoned me this evening, and he's going to refer me. Any issues, and he'll phone again. If not, I'll get a letter saying where and when to see a specialist.





Going back to the phone thing ................
Many years ago, I was working in the Fleet Maintenance Base in Devonport. I "ran" a desk looking after the ships and their defects and organised support. I was on the blower to MOD and to outside contractors numerous times a day, and in contact with people in Devonport too. Rather than phone the people nearby, I would walk there and see them personally, even if it took a twenty minute walk. Far better to chat and socialise than speak on a phone. Swap a few yarns, have a cuppa, speak face-to-face, and actually meet the person rather than just a voice.



I know that during this Virus Thing, that it's all a bit difficult, so if it's 'that difficult' they should streamline the telephone system to cope. Hanging on the phone for 20mins listening to mindless music just to ask for the doctor to phone me, is just plain silly.
Mick F. Cornwall

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Syd
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Syd » 10 Nov 2020, 6:55pm

Mick F wrote:Going back to the phone thing ................
Many years ago, I was working in the Fleet Maintenance Base in Devonport. I "ran" a desk looking after the ships and their defects and organised support. I was on the blower to MOD and to outside contractors numerous times a day, and in contact with people in Devonport too. Rather than phone the people nearby, I would walk there and see them personally, even if it took a twenty minute walk. Far better to chat and socialise than speak on a phone. Swap a few yarns, have a cuppa, speak face-to-face, and actually meet the person rather than just a voice.

Sounds like a very inefficient way to work and something I would have issue with anyone in my team doing nowadays.

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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Jdsk » 10 Nov 2020, 7:06pm

Mick F wrote:It could have all been done by email perhaps, but that option isn't available to my knowledge. Perhaps it is?

TTBOMK there aren't any national data. I think that it's very widespread. I use it.

The very rapid shift away from face-to-face consultations has been an enormous success. They're still there when needed.

As above, please can everyone show a bit of forbearance and reduce the physical contacts where possible.

Jonathan

PS: The best model that I've seen yet in primary care is a booking chat by 'phone or email or some online chat system. That allows the problem to be recorded and the most appropriate channel for the consultation agreed.

PPS: And for EDs prior communication before attendance is being promoted. That could end up in national guidance RSN.

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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby thirdcrank » 10 Nov 2020, 7:09pm

I've used the phone a lot at work over the years and perhaps that's why I've come to prefer to avoid it. Few organisations seem to do it well, partly because they prefer people to go online. Now,if an organisation doesn't offer an online option, basing their service on the systems used by companies to deter callers will lead to dissatisfaction.

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Mick F
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Mick F » 10 Nov 2020, 7:18pm

It was the early 1990s and I was in charge. If any of the others wanted to do the same, I'd have been very happy indeed. I wasn't the only one either.
You need co-operation to keep a team working efficiently.
Spending all day on the phone speaking to people does not foster co-operation and team work.

Ruth, a lady in the contracts office, maybe a ten minute walk away, was a lovely lady. Very knowledgeable and helpful, and we had many a face-to-face meeting and a cuppa together. Some months went by, and me and Mrs Mick F were in a local pub, and who should walk in, but Ruth! :D

Had we only been on the blower with each other, we would never have recognised each other or even knew we lived nearby.
We are all people with personalities and only ever taking facelessly on a phone is just plain wrong.




................ anyway, all this is very much off-topic.
I was happy to phone to ask for the doc to phone me. It's just that the Health Centre is less than a mile from our front door and it was simpler and easier to speak personally to the receptionist ........... even at 2m distance through a Perspex screen and wearing a face mask.

Hanging on for 20mins and blocking up the phone line when other people would need it, was silly.
Mick F. Cornwall

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Paulatic
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Paulatic » 10 Nov 2020, 7:23pm

Email? I’ve never realised you could email the doctors I’ve never heard the like before.
Just had a look at my surgery website and sure enough admin@*****
Learn something every day. :D
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PhilD28
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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby PhilD28 » 10 Nov 2020, 7:25pm

If it's possible try and get a referrral to the Pulvertaft hand clinic and have the work done by Mr Chris Bainbridge. Probably the bestplace in the country. I had mine done 10 years ago and despite what is generaly the case it hasn't returned. i was working as a professional guitarist at the time and was concerned that I would have to stop, I was back performing within 3 weeks.
It was one visit for an assessment then a day case surgery and home on the evening.

Link,https://www.pulvertafthandcentre.org.uk

Good luck with it.

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Re: Dupuytren's contracture

Postby Jdsk » 10 Nov 2020, 7:31pm

Paulatic wrote:Email? I’ve never realised you could email the doctors I’ve never heard the like before.
Just had a look at my surgery website and sure enough admin@*****
Learn something every day.

In England you can also access your own health records online: a core set everywhere and more/ all in some areas.

And in most (? all) areas carry out two key transactions: management of appointments and prescriptions.

Start by talking (!) to your own practice.

Jonathan