All Weather Chain Lubes

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Mick F
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Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby Mick F » 2 May 2016, 7:54pm

................. and where you live?

I mentioned before, that we lived in w Scotland.
We lived on the southern shore of Loch Lomond and I cycle-commuted to Clyde Submarine Base 14miles each way.
Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 19.49.51.png
Most of the nearly three years we lived there, the roads rarely dried out - spring, summer, autumn, winter. The roads were damp and grimy most of the time.

Round here down in Cornwall, the roads dry very quickly, even in the winter.
Mick F. Cornwall

Brucey
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby Brucey » 2 May 2016, 8:04pm

Read what I wrote; wetness is no big deal; most lubes will cope with wetness reasonably well provided you can be bothered to reapply them often enough. What really banjaxes chains in the wintertime is saltyness.

Very many coastal roads in the west part of the UK are not anywhere near as regularly gritted as inland roads or roads in the eastern part of the country; the reason for this is that any onshore breeze will prevent a hard frost. Together with regular 'rinsings' from rain, they can (provided they are not subject to sea spray directly) be essentially salt-free almost year-round.

I calculated that to give approximately the same amount of salt on our roads local to me in a typical winter, you would have to flood the roads with sea water to a depth of one metre, then let all the water evaporate. You might think the result would look like the shores of the Dead Sea, and you'd be right; unless it has rained exceptionally hard, the roads near me are stained white wherever they start to dry out in the wintertime.

The effects on chains are unbelieveable; basically anything they say 'works great' in California might as well be chucked in the bin, it ain't gonna work on the majority of UK winter roads.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Mick F
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby Mick F » 2 May 2016, 8:12pm

Brucey wrote:Read what I wrote; wetness is no big deal; most lubes will cope with wetness reasonably well provided you can be bothered to reapply them often enough. What really banjaxes chains in the wintertime is saltyness.
Yes, you read wot I rit too. :wink:

Having lived Up North for my younger days, plus having lived in Scotland for over ten years in total as an adult - and cycling to work, I know what the weather is like. In Scotland, they salted the roads for months on end, and even when they didn't, the saltiness remained there.

What it's like now, I couldn't say, but I can assure anyone reading this, that from 1972-1980 and 1982-1985 and 1991-1992 the roads were filthy and salty. It was well known that Scottish cars rusted far faster than English cars back then, and even now I wouldn't even consider buying a Scottish registered car.
Mick F. Cornwall

Brucey
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby Brucey » 2 May 2016, 8:22pm

I agree in general, but I'm not sure whether all or just some of your route would have been 'coastal enough' to have escaped the worst effects of regular gritting; even the loopiest councils don't grit roads that don't freeze (you'd hope... :wink: ).

In the west parts of the UK it does get cold enough to freeze for a few days but then it warms up again and when it does it usually rains hard. This usually washes the salt away.

The effects of onshore breezes make for coastal microclimates that are substantially different to those which are further inland.

In other parts of the country, even though it isn't 'dry weather' per se we might go weeks without significant/heavy rain, during which time the roads remain covered in salt. They are often so covered in salt that they won't dry out. If there is any chance that even part of the road might have no salt on it, they re-grit the roads.

If I do ride a 'good bike' in the winter, I have to wash it after each and every ride, else it will corrode horribly.

cheers
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bainbridge
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby bainbridge » 3 May 2016, 7:25am

Mick F wrote:

Remove the cap, invert the bottle and drizzle the lube on the bottom run of the chain and turn the cranks backwards.


Won't you just be depositing lube on the outer chainring?

Applying the oil to the chain on top of the upper jockey wheel and backpedalling means that each freshly oiled link immediately gets flexed one way then the other, drawing the oil into each link.

It's fiddly but worthwhile IMO.

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Mick F
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby Mick F » 3 May 2016, 8:24am

Good idea. I may try that next time.

When I do it normally, the cranks are turned quite briskly, so the lube gets distributed PDQ.
Mick F. Cornwall

MikeDee
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Re: All Weather Chain Lubes

Postby MikeDee » 11 May 2016, 4:32pm

bainbridge wrote:
Mick F wrote:

Remove the cap, invert the bottle and drizzle the lube on the bottom run of the chain and turn the cranks backwards.


Won't you just be depositing lube on the outer chainring?

Applying the oil to the chain on top of the upper jockey wheel and backpedalling means that each freshly oiled link immediately gets flexed one way then the other, drawing the oil into each link.

It's fiddly but worthwhile IMO.


But it gets flexed anyway when you spin the cranks.