"Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
User avatar
deliquium
Posts: 1797
Joined: 9 Mar 2007, 3:40pm
Location: Eryri

"Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby deliquium » 16 Oct 2017, 9:13am

A blog post from December 2105 -

"Before Orville and Wilbur Wright gained fame as the first people to make a controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight they owned and ran a bicycle repair, rental and sales company in Dayton, Ohio, under the name the Wright Cycle Exchange . . . "

http://wp.me/p5eGAy-uD
Attachments
file.jpg
Current pedalable joys

"you would be surprised at the number of people in these parts who nearly are half people and half bicycles"

whoof
Posts: 955
Joined: 29 Apr 2014, 2:13pm

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby whoof » 16 Oct 2017, 10:11am

deliquium wrote:A blog post from December 2105 -

"http://wp.me/p5eGAy-uD


How did Brexit turn out in the end?

Brucey
Posts: 26874
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby Brucey » 16 Oct 2017, 7:11pm

the blog post is good fun but repeats the assertion that the Wright Bros 'invented' LH pedal threading. It is my understanding that it was first used by JK Starley, who made the first 'safety bicycle'.

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

JakobW
Posts: 33
Joined: 9 Jun 2014, 1:26pm
Location: Sunny Cambridge

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby JakobW » 16 Oct 2017, 8:45pm

Of course a lot of the aviation pioneers (at least in the UK) started out as cycling enthusiasts if not cycling manufacturers; for instance Sir Charles Rolls (of Rolls-Royce) fame raced cycles while he was at Cambridge.

I've always wondered how many of the early aerodynamicists were cyclists; certainly in the​ late 19th century bicycles would have been one of the few forms of transport going fast enough to benefit from aero gains, and certainly the only form where the benefits would have been immediately obvious to the rider.

9494arnold
Posts: 475
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 3:13pm

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby 9494arnold » 17 Oct 2017, 12:18pm

Mr Martin of Aston Martin fame was an eminent Tricycle Racer in his day :)

9494arnold
Posts: 475
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 3:13pm

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby 9494arnold » 17 Oct 2017, 12:28pm

LWB Martin Bath Road Club member and one time holder Edinburgh to York Trike record.

rmurphy195
Posts: 953
Joined: 20 May 2011, 11:23am
Location: South Birmingham

Re: "Transferable Technology: From the Bicycle to the Aeroplane and the Car"

Postby rmurphy195 » 17 Oct 2017, 7:19pm

As far as I can recollect from bits of reading/info in museums etc. many car makers in Europe started life making bicycles, then motorised bicycles, then cyclocars/cars. In those early days they used the technology they knew as a basis for moving on.The wheels on those early vehicles,and the chain drive, are the most obvious examples of this approach - bringing in of course the technologies used by carriage makers.

Just as an aside, the Iron Bridge demonstrates this approach very clearly - look closely and you will realise that it's put together using mainly carpentry techniques (mortise/tenon joints, wedges and pegs). And of course the classic arch which goes back to the stonemasons art.
Scott Purgatory MTB, Brompton, Condor Heritage, creaky joints and grey hair
""You know you're getting old when it's easier to ride a bike than to get on and off it" - quote from observant jogger !