A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

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mjr
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby mjr » 15 Nov 2018, 11:57am

Mike_Ayling wrote:Dunno if ithas already been mentioned but Thorn states that their use will void their frame warranty and Surly used to say the same but they may have changed their opinion lately.

Not quite as bad as that from Thorn: https://www.thorncycles.co.uk/faqs#collapseGroup4Faq4 just says they don't cover the consequences of stand use. However, that probably means that they build their bikes without stand plates, which makes them much less practical for touring because it would be difficult to park it in busier bits of countries like Denmark. Where there are stands, they're often ones that expect you to put the bike on a centre stand and put its front wheel in a slot, as pictured below, with the standless condemned to locking to trees and signposts and so on, or risking falling over like one in the picture.

Surly has indeed been mentioned. Use the "Search this topic" box at the top of the page before posting, please.
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PeterBL
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby PeterBL » 15 Nov 2018, 12:15pm

mjr wrote:However, that probably means that they build their bikes without stand plates, which makes them much less practical for touring because it would be difficult to park it in busier bits of countries like Denmark. Where there are stands, they're often ones that expect you to put the bike on a centre stand and put its front wheel in a slot, as pictured below, with the standless condemned to locking to trees and signposts and so on, or risking falling over like one in the picture.

No, on the pictured stand the front wheel is holding the bike upright.

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mjr
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby mjr » 15 Nov 2018, 2:17pm

PeterBL wrote:
mjr wrote:However, that probably means that they build their bikes without stand plates, which makes them much less practical for touring because it would be difficult to park it in busier bits of countries like Denmark. Where there are stands, they're often ones that expect you to put the bike on a centre stand and put its front wheel in a slot, as pictured below, with the standless condemned to locking to trees and signposts and so on, or risking falling over like one in the picture.

No, on the pictured stand the front wheel is holding the bike upright.

Only on the poor ones without stands, as mentioned.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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Vantage
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby Vantage » 15 Nov 2018, 3:11pm

LittleGreyCat wrote:
Vantage wrote:<snip>
Said advice was followed and my old Vantage had a single legged stand without damage for its life of 7 years till I killed it. Not through the stand.
The current Spa has a twin leg stand and Pletscher supplied a rubbery resin spacer of sorts to further reduce the chance of damage.
<snip>.


Ah! Did the spacer come as standard or as an extra?


Supplied :)
Bill


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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby zenitb » 15 Nov 2018, 8:23pm

mjr wrote:
zenitb wrote:Really if you are leaving the bike for any length of time you want to lock it to something rather than leave it on the stand..as I have here :-)

I'm glad it's still safe enough there that a wire string lock suffices. :-)

LOL..guilty as charged!!! I am relying on the ugly bike to deter theft !!! :oops:

AndyA
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby AndyA » 15 Nov 2018, 11:49pm

I hate kickstands, but if you do feel the need to fit one they are much less likely to break if you trim/adjust them to the correct length. Especially twin-leggers. The vertical distance between the kickstand plate and the ground is pretty close to the optimum length for single leggers

Wag67
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby Wag67 » 16 Nov 2018, 8:53am

I’ve got a aluminium bike I tour on I bought in 1993. The seat tube cracked badly (it extends a good bit above the top tube). I knew a good engineering shop so I booked it in and had it welded up. There is no way I’m going to let the bike die, I will go first. A good welder will make that as strong as new, it just won’t be quite as pretty though.

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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby Brucey » 16 Nov 2018, 10:37am

Wag67 wrote:I’ve got a aluminium bike I tour on I bought in 1993. The seat tube cracked badly (it extends a good bit above the top tube). I knew a good engineering shop so I booked it in and had it welded up. There is no way I’m going to let the bike die, I will go first. A good welder will make that as strong as new, it just won’t be quite as pretty though.


The welder can be as good as he likes but the HAZ of the weld will be just as crap either way. Aluminium frames -especially those which are not heat treated after welding- are pretty disposable things, much moreso than steel ones.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wag67
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby Wag67 » 16 Nov 2018, 10:56am

I can only say that the repair was done eight years ago, and it is still holding up well after thousands of miles. I’m a pretty big bloke too at sixteen and a half stone

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mjr
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby mjr » 27 Nov 2018, 2:12pm

pete75 wrote:
mjr wrote:Ooh get you townies with high square kerbs (!)

Ours are relatively low and the face slopes at 45°


Never seen any like that. We have square kerbs where there are pavements and none where there aren't. There's even some on the road outside our house https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.83189 ... 312!8i6656

At long last, here's a photo of our local ones, so you can have seen some! The great advantage of these is that you can ride up/down them fairly easily, as long as you make a deliberate turn. Cambridge seem to have used something similar to divide their latest cycleways from the carriageways.

I have since noticed that there are actually some square kerbs around here too, at bus stops and where the cycleway has been built out over the old drains and the new kerbs have drain channels through them - neither are places where you'd want to stand a bike in the road, though.
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pete75
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby pete75 » 27 Nov 2018, 2:44pm

mjr wrote:
pete75 wrote:
mjr wrote:Ooh get you townies with high square kerbs (!)

Ours are relatively low and the face slopes at 45°


Never seen any like that. We have square kerbs where there are pavements and none where there aren't. There's even some on the road outside our house https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.83189 ... 312!8i6656

At long last, here's a photo of our local ones, so you can have seen some! The great advantage of these is that you can ride up/down them fairly easily, as long as you make a deliberate turn. Cambridge seem to have used something similar to divide their latest cycleways from the carriageways.

I have since noticed that there are actually some square kerbs around here too, at bus stops and where the cycleway has been built out over the old drains and the new kerbs have drain channels through them - neither are places where you'd want to stand a bike in the road, though.

Round here bus stops , well the ones in town anyway, have very high built up kerbs.
I bet you still have to take those at 90 degrees to ride up don't you?

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mjr
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby mjr » 27 Nov 2018, 3:46pm

pete75 wrote:Round here bus stops , well the ones in town anyway, have very high built up kerbs.
I bet you still have to take those at 90 degrees to ride up don't you?

Give or take 30 degrees, probably. No use to stand a bike up, though.

Do buses near you not have ramps that flip or slide out?
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pete75
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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby pete75 » 27 Nov 2018, 6:03pm

mjr wrote:
pete75 wrote:Round here bus stops , well the ones in town anyway, have very high built up kerbs.
I bet you still have to take those at 90 degrees to ride up don't you?

Give or take 30 degrees, probably. No use to stand a bike up, though.

Do buses near you not have ramps that flip or slide out?


Not that I've noticed. When stopped the front suspension can drop and leave the entrance level with the raised kerb. My guess is they have air suspension.

This sort of thing in big places.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.76348 ... 312!8i6656

In villages it's more like this - not even a sign. The bus timetables just say Church for that village.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.83689 ... 312!8i6656

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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby MrsHJ » 24 Jan 2019, 7:29am

Any views on getting a click stand?

http://www.click-stand.com

I’ve never used a stand but my bike is sometimes on the floor when touring due to lack of places to put it. Concerned this could be extra noticeable as a problem in Kansas etc I do stop quite often! I can’t see myself using it in towns as no doubt local youth would be highly amused at removing it.

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Re: A kickstand has killed my touring bike...

Postby Graham » 24 Jan 2019, 7:58am

MrsHJ wrote:Any views on getting a click stand?

Try the search box ( top right ). Use "click-stand" as the search term. [ Note the double quotes. ]

Plenty of post to research.