Pumps

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mattsccm
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Pumps

Postby mattsccm » 26 Apr 2018, 7:42am

N+1 (dozen) means that I need a new pump. Just thought I see if I was missing something nowadays. I guess the default will be a Zefal HPX but I was wondering if there was anything else. Stuff mini pumps and those with flip out foot pegs etc. Maybe even the old knock on Zefal (an 88 or what even they were called)
Your thoughts please

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Gattonero
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Re: Pumps

Postby Gattonero » 26 Apr 2018, 7:56am

Those ones from Lezyne like the Road Drive are pretty good.
Image

Not cheap, but they ar every efficient. I have the small one and you can actually pump a 700x23mm road tyre to 80psi in less than two minutes, havent tried any pocket-sized pump that can do that. The large Lezyne one is a pleasure to use, you can pump 100psi in about a minute :D
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

hamster
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Re: Pumps

Postby hamster » 26 Apr 2018, 9:11am

Park Tool do a really nice long one, it's rather clever as it fits all frame lengths. It discontinued but a few around in stock. Bought mine a couple of years ago, very happy. 100psi is easily reached.
https://www.acycles.co.uk/park-tool-dia ... J2EALw_wcB

mercalia
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Re: Pumps

Postby mercalia » 26 Apr 2018, 10:12am


Brucey
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Re: Pumps

Postby Brucey » 26 Apr 2018, 10:44am

the ideal pump depends whether you are using fat tyres at low pressures or skinny tyres at high pressures, whether you want it to fit in the frame, have a gauge, easily convert from Schrader to presta etc etc.

BTW some of the pumps that folk claim are 'wonderful' are for many users actually 'crap'; they work OK if they stay inside a pannier bag but if they are strapped on the outside of the bike and used in mud/weather they get water in them (because they are not in any way weather resistant, in fact their design more closely resembles a funnel than anything else.... :roll: ) and they pretty soon stop working.

Very many pumps work OK to start with but soon break or go wrong in some interesting way that means they cannot be fixed easily or at all. Some have highly irritating features and/or are a faff to use, having daft screw-on connectors and so forth. It is a right racket.

The reason the HPX design has endured is arguably that it does not suffer from the same kinds of problems too often.

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

mattsccm
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Re: Pumps

Postby mattsccm » 26 Apr 2018, 10:56am

As above hence my inclination towards another HPX. Never had a Topeak last more than a couple of years and although I didn't say it, for road/rough stuff use so 70 psi + and frame fitting as long ones with single brackets don't last.

pwa
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Re: Pumps

Postby pwa » 26 Apr 2018, 11:02am

mattsccm wrote:As above hence my inclination towards another HPX. Never had a Topeak last more than a couple of years and although I didn't say it, for road/rough stuff use so 70 psi + and frame fitting as long ones with single brackets don't last.

I have a Topeak track pump that I've had for a good few years. It's now on its second hose. But that is, of course, kept indoors. For a frame-fit pump I can't imagine why anyone would want to look any further than the tried and tested HPX. It just works, for years. Lube it once in a while and it will always be there when you need it.

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Gattonero
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Re: Pumps

Postby Gattonero » 26 Apr 2018, 1:53pm

Brucey wrote:the ideal pump depends whether you are using fat tyres at low pressures or skinny tyres at high pressures, whether you want it to fit in the frame, have a gauge, easily convert from Schrader to presta etc etc.

BTW some of the pumps that folk claim are 'wonderful' are for many users actually 'crap'; they work OK if they stay inside a pannier bag but if they are strapped on the outside of the bike and used in mud/weather they get water in them (because they are not in any way weather resistant, in fact their design more closely resembles a funnel than anything else.... :roll: ) and they pretty soon stop working.

Very many pumps work OK to start with but soon break or go wrong in some interesting way that means they cannot be fixed easily or at all. Some have highly irritating features and/or are a faff to use, having daft screw-on connectors and so forth. It is a right racket.

The reason the HPX design has endured is arguably that it does not suffer from the same kinds of problems too often.

cheers


A good point for the Lezyne is that the hose/connector stays inside the rod, and between the rod and the chamber there is a shaped o-ring that stops water and keeps the two parts together.
Fat bikes are a different matter. Big tyres require a high volume pump, though a road one will do the job nevertheless: can even take 5 minutes pumping will be easy with a road pump (each stroke will be almost effortless when pumping to 35psi) and is better than been stuck in the woods with an unusable Co2 canister :(
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

Nigel
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Re: Pumps

Postby Nigel » 26 Apr 2018, 8:10pm

I've had a Toppeak "MasterBlaster", in a medium length, on my fine-weather bike for over ten years. Gets some use, and it works every time. Also quite light. Stored in the rear triangle, with a peg on frame.
And a long HPX on my tourer, but I find the valve to be a bit leaky and troublesome. Its been serviced with a new valve kit, but not noticeably better. A bit of PTF tape has improved things. Stored under top-tube, so out of the way of winter spray.

Recently bought partner a Lezyne mini-pump with fold out stand. Precisely what is not required by original poster. But, it works and is not that slow to reasonable pressures (say 70psi in 700x28mm tyres), and has a pressure gauge. Seems well made, and can be used by someone who finds standard pumps to not work for them. Main hassle was mounting it on bike. It came with a "under bottle cage" bracket, but that didn't seem to fit well on a small bike. So, at present its attached to rear rack, where it will probably stay, but with the addition of a couple of bits of padding tape to stop it rattling.


Routine at-home tyre checks are from a track pump.


- Nigel

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andrew_s
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Re: Pumps

Postby andrew_s » 26 Apr 2018, 8:49pm

An HPx is as good as anything, or a Topeak Road Master Blaster, which is much the same.
The question will be whether the frame takes a frame fit pump - many modern frames don't, what with sloping top tubes, rounded joints etc.

JohnW
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Re: Pumps

Postby JohnW » 26 Apr 2018, 10:51pm

Gattonero wrote:Those ones from Lezyne like the Road Drive are pretty good. . . . ..

I have three of those - one is black - they come with various different brand names, but apart from very minor details, still the same pump. I tried one, and it was such a success (for me, anyway) that I now have one in each saddlebag/rackpack. Taking all into consideration, it's my favourite among all I've found so far (and that's a long time!).

MikeDee
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Re: Pumps

Postby MikeDee » 27 Apr 2018, 3:28pm

Gattonero wrote:Those ones from Lezyne like the Road Drive are pretty good. . . . .


Does this pump screw onto the valve? If so, using on tubes or tubeless valves with removable valve cores, like Continental tubes, can cause the valve core to unscrew when you remove the pump from the valve. Happened to a friend of mine. You can put some Loctite on the valve core thread though. Very frustrating if it happens to you at the side of the road.

Randy_Butternubs
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Re: Pumps

Postby Randy_Butternubs » 27 Apr 2018, 6:07pm

Gattonero wrote:Those ones from Lezyne like the Road Drive are pretty good. . . . . .


It does screw on. This caught me out once but I didn't have much trouble with it - just screwing the valve core back on hard with my fingers and screwing on the pump lightly was enough to fix it until I got home and nipped up the valves with a spanner.

You can flip the hose in which case it just pushes onto the valve. It unsurprisingly wants to pop off from the pressure though which makes it pretty awkward. A schraeder interface would have been more useful.

Des49
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Re: Pumps

Postby Des49 » 27 Apr 2018, 8:22pm

andrew_s wrote:An HPx is as good as anything, or a Topeak Road Master Blaster, which is much the same.
The question will be whether the frame takes a frame fit pump - many modern frames don't, what with sloping top tubes, rounded joints etc.


Agree re the HPX, they are very usable pumps.

The only snag is that they are fairly large diameter at the handle end compared to the pumps of old, this means on a couple of my frames it won't fit in the pump peg to be held horizontally under the top tube. Not an issue at home for short rides as I can put the pump along the seat tube, but this covers one set of water bottle bosses which may be needed on longer rides.

JohnW
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Re: Pumps

Postby JohnW » 27 Apr 2018, 9:04pm

Des49 wrote:Agree re the HPX, they are very usable pumps.

The only snag is that they are fairly large diameter at the handle end compared to the pumps of old, this means on a couple of my frames it won't fit in the pump peg to be held horizontally under the top tube. Not an issue at home for short rides as I can put the pump along the seat tube, but this covers one set of water bottle bosses which may be needed on longer rides.

Ah - well then - one of us has got it wrong. My pump(s) are very small and compact. One of mine has the brand name 'Giant' - it is 215mm long and 20mm maximum diameter. It fits in my rack-pack comfortably and is no-way designed for frame fitting.

I eagerly await someone else's post to put me right on this.