Head bearing rust

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
Samuel D
Posts: 2248
Joined: 8 Mar 2015, 11:05pm
Location: Paris

Re: Head bearing rust

Postby Samuel D » 17 May 2018, 6:48pm

Successful removal of the old headset and installation of the Campagnolo. Looks pretty good all around!

I’ll eventually need to get a grease gun that would suit this headset and be useful for general-purpose greasing instead of my little finger. Any recommendations?

Brucey
Posts: 30799
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Head bearing rust

Postby Brucey » 17 May 2018, 10:01pm

it depends how you want to buy your grease but if you bulk fill the smallest (new) grease gun that does this job is the little dualco one. If you buy grease in little tubes then there are little grease guns that screw into the tubes; with the end snipped off the tube you can refill the tubes.

My favourite grease guns are Wanner ones. Top quality, full spares backup. Overkill if you are just maintaining one bike though.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Samuel D
Posts: 2248
Joined: 8 Mar 2015, 11:05pm
Location: Paris

Re: Head bearing rust

Postby Samuel D » 23 May 2018, 2:50pm

Thanks, Brucey.

Just before wrapping this up … is it okay for there to be visible movement of the headset parts when holding the front brake and rocking the bicycle back and forth? (Or rather, pushing and pulling it slowly, for there is viscous resistance to the movement.)

That is, the upper cover on which the headset spacers sit moves relative to the upper cup (there’s movement between parts HS-HD103 and HS-RE110 on page 3 of this PDF). Obviously this means the parts aren’t always perfectly concentric.

I’m trying to use the minimum preload possible and this is the least preload that avoids audible knocking over speed bumps or when the bicycle is dropped on hard ground from a low height.

Brucey
Posts: 30799
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Head bearing rust

Postby Brucey » 23 May 2018, 8:40pm

if there is movement then the parts will settle/wear in use. I'd try a little more preload and see how that feels. Remember that it is usually the combination of preload and service loads adding together that causes damage, so a moderately excessive preload isn't going to damage the parts instantly, but might help the wedge to settle more quickly. Thus if you set to a low preload, note the position, and then overtighten slightly, then back off and then retension, if the parts have settled even slightly then the setting will be different second time around.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Samuel D
Posts: 2248
Joined: 8 Mar 2015, 11:05pm
Location: Paris

Re: Head bearing rust

Postby Samuel D » 23 May 2018, 9:15pm

Got it.