Pannier Advice

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
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foxyrider
Posts: 4516
Joined: 29 Aug 2011, 10:25am
Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby foxyrider » 8 Jul 2018, 8:00pm

wearwell wrote:
foxyrider wrote:...
By strap I presume you mean the shoulder strap? I have tried that - didn't last one trip as they constantly came adrift and got caught on undergrowth etc......
You fixed them wrongly then!


Nope, followed exactly the instructions. I'm not the only one to have had the same issues either, the bottom hook isn't deep enough to retain the strap well.

And anyway, if you remove the hook and leave the strap at home you can save 100 grams per bag! Lol :lol:
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

PH
Posts: 7500
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 12:31am
Location: Derby
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Re: Pannier Advice

Postby PH » 9 Jul 2018, 9:13am

F70100 wrote:How do Ortlieb Roller Classic users tend to fasten them?

Do you (a) mostly use the strap and route it under the hook, or (b) forget the strap and clip the side release buckles together in typical dry bag fashion?

Personally, I find using the strap far too fiddly.

B - dry bag style, I think it's mostly the central strap that's holding them shut, I've noticed not all models have this.
I used the shoulder strap when I first had them, but had it come off a couple of times as the contents settled.

simonhill
Posts: 2519
Joined: 13 Jan 2007, 11:28am
Location: Essex

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby simonhill » 9 Jul 2018, 5:05pm

gregoryoftours wrote:I would get Ortleib, Carradice or Crosso panniers, although I think I'm right that only the Ortleib panniers have hooks that actually lock around the top rail of the rack. It's a big deal for me as I tend to go over some quite rough terrain.


My Super Cs have locking hooks. The earlier ones just had a hook over, but the locking ones have been about for many years now. They can be a but fiddly, especially one of the front ones which is a bit close to the seatpost strut on my Tubus rack.

Reckon the slightly fiddly nature adds to non nickability.

MrsHJ
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Joined: 19 Aug 2010, 1:03pm
Location: Dartmouth, Devon.

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby MrsHJ » 21 Jul 2018, 11:56pm

Sweep wrote:I can recommend the Ortlieb Bikepacker pluses MrsHJ.

Have had mine getting on for 20 years - in addition to touring they have been used for lots and lots of tough shopping and still look like new.

If you go for them, I'd make sure you aren't getting an older model (like mine) and that they are fitted with QL2.1 hooks. The ".1" signifies that the dreaded hook inserts go in from the side, not the bottom. After a few years OK use, I was then plagued with the inserts dropping out and the panniers partially detaching themselves from the racks. At least Ortlieb used a design which allows the hooks to be simply swapped and snapped on - cost me £20 to fit QL2.1 hooks and now all is well.

The only issue I have with them touring is that I do find them a bit small (barely 40 litres a pair I think) so I have to put more stuff on top of the rack. So I may get those bigger Ortliebs you aren't keen on, though they do seem to have gone a bit overboard with them. I think I would be happy with 50 or 60 litres the pair.

If it makes you feel better about your classic rolltops and you shop by bike, I find them great for shopping. I recently acquired a second hand pair for a very good press and they are way better as a shopping pannier than the more expensive Bike Packer Pluses. They have a lot of straps you have to faff with and if you aren't careful, since Ortlieb has provided more strap than you can possibly need, you have to be careful that they don't end up in your wheel or interfere with your chain.

So in short I'd be inclined to get the Bikepacker Pluses as soon as finances allow AND keep your existing ones.

I have looked at other panniers and do have some more but I do think that Ortliebs are unbeatable for serious touring. Spares readily available as well. Also a reason for standardising on them.


Just saw this, Thank you. Re size- I'm experimenting with packing volume at the moment as I've got a bit relaxed when touring with the kids.

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freiston
Posts: 674
Joined: 6 Oct 2013, 10:20am
Location: Coventry

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby freiston » 22 Jul 2018, 10:36am

foxyrider wrote:
PJ520 wrote:
TBH i've never found a compass to be of much use on a bike, roads rarely go very far in a single direction, my routes certainly don't! There is a compass app on my phone if I really need the function.

I find it easy enough to use the map for orientation and on the rare occasion the sun comes out - well in the northern hemisphere the sun, during riding hours, will always be to the south, if it's rising i'm going east if it's dropping, west - simples.

Back in the eighties, I was coming off the Wolverhampton ring to take the A449 south but took the A449 north. I can't remember what aroused my suspicions but it was a small Silva compass removed from my bar bag and held in the hand (whilst still on the move) that confirmed my suspicions before I turned around :oops:
Disclaimer: Treat what I say with caution and if possible, wait for someone with more knowledge and experience to contribute. ;)

wearwell
Posts: 307
Joined: 3 Feb 2011, 8:45am

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby wearwell » 24 Jul 2018, 8:23am

I always take a compass for the reason
freiston wrote:
foxyrider wrote:
PJ520 wrote:
TBH i've never found a compass to be of much use on a bike, roads rarely go very far in a single direction, my routes certainly don't! There is a compass app on my phone if I really need the function.

I find it easy enough to use the map for orientation and on the rare occasion the sun comes out - well in the northern hemisphere the sun, during riding hours, will always be to the south, if it's rising i'm going east if it's dropping, west - simples.

Back in the eighties, I was coming off the Wolverhampton ring to take the A449 south but took the A449 north. I can't remember what aroused my suspicions but it was a small Silva compass removed from my bar bag and held in the hand (whilst still on the move) that confirmed my suspicions before I turned around :oops:
I always take a compass for the same reason.
Town or country you can lose your bearings quite easily, especially if you've done a few turns, you have no familiar landmarks and the sun isn't out.
One town circumstance is when you come out of a large station which has several ways in from different directions. You think you are on the north side and must turn left but in fact you are south and going in exactly the wrong direction.
A map is only useful for orientation if you know where you are to start with - sometimes you just can't work it out.

Another little item which can be useful is a loud whistle - football ref style. You can suddenly find yourself out of sight of your partner and not sure whether he/she's in front or behind. A whistle might just get you connected - it carries further than a shout. I've used it a few times on various excursions. I've also had nightmare experience of losing contact and both of us going around in circles looking for the other although never more than half a mile apart - a whistle would have helped.

Tangled Metal
Posts: 5691
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 8:32pm

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby Tangled Metal » 24 Jul 2018, 8:46am

Ortliebs for me because they're cheap enough compared to the Arkel ones I'd rather have. £300+ I think the ones I really want. I'd need two sets plus extras!

I've got the big 70 litres panniers. 40 litres under the seat and 70 litres on the back rack. I prefer panniers not to be completely full but I didn't want to run out of volume just in case. I'm the load lugger for two adults and young child. Plus I've yet to try a pack I might never end up needing the full 70 litres but I thought they looked good.

Personally I think Ortliebs are good for simple packing people who want dry. Carradice, some arkel and other pocketed brands are good for fussy packers who like organising themselves in an obvious way (I am very organised in single compartment Ortliebs). Then there's arkel cost a fortune panniers which are for fussy packers wanting pockets and obvious organisation but in a waterproof package. With ability to add on a lot of extras like cylinder bags.

Carradice is also nostalgia for the old ways of cotton duck and built to last. Personally I'm too throw away for that. I prefer dry for 15 years then replace your Ortliebs.

dsea
Posts: 15
Joined: 19 Jan 2018, 2:34pm

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby dsea » 26 Jul 2018, 5:07pm

Just a quick note to thank all who contributed to this post. In the end after going to see the suggested options we went for the Ortlieb Back Roller.
These have had a good testing trip in the Lakes and so far so good.
Once again many thanks to all for the input.
Regards David

markjohnobrien
Posts: 169
Joined: 4 Oct 2007, 8:15pm

Re: Pannier Advice

Postby markjohnobrien » 29 Jul 2018, 11:56am

Great panniers - mine have been in use for around 18 years in green.