Spa Rough Stuff bike

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cooper_coleraine
Posts: 141
Joined: 6 Feb 2009, 6:21pm

Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby cooper_coleraine » 5 Aug 2018, 6:04pm

Has anyone experience/knowledge of this model? I am also interested in frame sizes. I am 5 foot 6 inches tall, 29 inch inside leg and have usually ridden Raleigh ,Randonneur and Classic 54 frame. Thanks for any help and advice. Country roads have suffered from a bad winter and the authorities are short of cash for repairs-road edges and surfaces can be treacherous and I am wondering if the Rough Stuff machine would help me this coming winter for day trips and short tours.

alexnharvey
Posts: 951
Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:39am

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby alexnharvey » 6 Aug 2018, 8:53am

Are you using the largest possible tyre in your current frame?

cooper_coleraine
Posts: 141
Joined: 6 Feb 2009, 6:21pm

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby cooper_coleraine » 6 Aug 2018, 12:46pm

Thanks for your reply. I am using 25s but could go to 28s. But you have made me think. I have a Cannondale Bad Girl ( currently loaned out) which will take 2 inch tyres on 26 wheels. Perhaps I have the solution to hand. Thanks.[list][/list]

alexnharvey
Posts: 951
Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:39am

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby alexnharvey » 6 Aug 2018, 2:02pm

Yes, the ability to fit larger tyres appears to be the main difference between the rough stuff and the standard spa tourer.

I'd be very tempted to buy and fit the largest possible tyre on your current bike in addition to having the bad girl back. Indeed, like many others I have moved to 25mm tyres on my road 'racing' bike and would happily go up to 28mm if they'd fit for rolling resistance and comfort reasons. Similarly on my town bike I have 28mms currently and have 36mm to fit when their time comes.

I hadn't been in a bike shop for a while and noticed yesterday that all the new racing and TT bikes all now have fat 25 and 28mm tyres as standard, no surprise to those who go to bike shops regularly but still quite striking to see in person.

A high volume 26inch tyre on your other bike is obviously another option if it is comfortable and well equipped for winter riding in other respects, e.g. mudguards and maybe racks.

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531colin
Posts: 12643
Joined: 4 Dec 2009, 6:56pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby 531colin » 6 Aug 2018, 3:22pm

alexnharvey wrote:Yes, the ability to fit larger tyres appears to be the main difference between the rough stuff and the standard spa tourer. ..........


Well, steering geometry is the same (head angle, fork offset)
Very long front centre on the Roughstuff as well.
Now I can't tell you why, but my Roughstuff (affectionally known as "The Dreadnought") simply rolls over stuff that has me carefully picking my way on my other roughstuff bike, an Orbit Romany. The major differences I think are 700 vs 26" wheels, that long front centre, and calmer steering on the Spa bike.

Brucey
Posts: 37471
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby Brucey » 6 Aug 2018, 3:47pm

I remember looking at the Spa roughstuff and thinking that the long front centres would mean that I (and almost certainly the OP too) would have to use a very short stem to get set right on it. Getting a 1-1/8" ahead stem that is both short and not unattractive is not always easy.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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531colin
Posts: 12643
Joined: 4 Dec 2009, 6:56pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Re: Spa Rough Stuff bike

Postby 531colin » 7 Aug 2018, 9:56am

Brucey wrote:I remember looking at the Spa roughstuff and thinking that the long front centres would mean that I (and almost certainly the OP too) would have to use a very short stem to get set right on it. Getting a 1-1/8" ahead stem that is both short and not unattractive is not always easy.
cheers


There may be a choice to be made between fashion and a bike that will look after the OP on broken roads.
The Wayfarers have broadly comparable front centres with the Roughstuff bikes, but Wayfarers have unfashionable long fork offset and slack head angle in order to get a shorter reach with long front centre. The wayfarer has handling which I like for a touring bike, but I haven't done a direct comparison of their capability on broken surfaces.
Before arthritis stopped me using drops, I used a Deda Cortissimo stem and Nitto Noodle bars on my Roughstuff. (There are plenty of bars shorter than Noodles, but I liked the long ramps). Now I use deeply unfashionable bullbars https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=113772&hilit=bullbars and a really ugly MTB stem, but it gets me out.