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Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 4:33pm
by woldsweather
Returning to cycle touring after 40 years absence! I am thinking there must be the cycling equivalence of satnavs? I know people have computeres on there handlebars but there wouldn't be any hope me reading one I'd need to stop and put on reading glasses. So then I'm thinking do they talk to you? Are there Bluetooth helmets that connect to them. As I am thinking one would be useful I am guessing they may be available? Recommendations from (reading) glasses wearing senior citizens?

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 4:46pm
by ice3-14
On the whole most people only needing reading glasses would find the handlebar computer maps in focus without corrective lenses because of the distance. Alternatively multi focus, varifocal spectacles are fairly inexpensive these days.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 4:52pm
by woldsweather
I can't focus within 5 m!

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 5:25pm
by Mick F
Neither can I! :lol:

I wear varifocal cycling glasses. I can operate my phone, read a map, and work my Garmin Montana. Without the varifocals, I wouldn't stand a chance.

The beauty of them, is that they are designed for cycling. My distance vision is almost perfect, but close-up is rubbish. I can wear the glasses and operate normally.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 5:29pm
by woldsweather
So are they perfectly clear at the top ie not optically altered and then reading at the bottom? Never heard of those. Are they off the peg or via an optician?

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 5:51pm
by Mick F
Varifocals are graduated top to bottom. Top is for distance and bottom for reading, with all points in between.
Not cheap.

I bought mine from Optilabs
https://www.optilabs.com/product-catego ... unglasses/
I'd had an eyetest locally, and sent them my prescription info. I did it all over the phone.

As for a bike computer, there's a whole world of them out there. Garmin seems to lead the field.
https://buy.garmin.com/en-GB/GB/cIntoSp ... ng-p1.html

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 5:56pm
by woldsweather
Yes but I don't need anything for distance. Are there any with nothing at the top and reading glasses at the bottom? Ideally sunglasses in same.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:04pm
by Airsporter1st
woldsweather wrote:Yes but I don't need anything for distance. Are there any with nothing at the top and reading glasses at the bottom? Ideally sunglasses in same.


Yes, they are available from any good optician. They still have glass at the top but with zero correction. Sunglasses ditto.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:14pm
by freiston
Osmand on my Android phone will calculate a route and give verbal directions. You can get a waterproof handlebar-mounted case if you want to see it too - otherwise you could put it in your pocket with a earphone to hear the directions, if required.

Edit: Osmand will plot "cycle-friendly" routes (user discretion advised).

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:20pm
by RickH
woldsweather wrote:Yes but I don't need anything for distance. Are there any with nothing at the top and reading glasses at the bottom? Ideally sunglasses in same.

Varifocals just change from your distance prescription (even it is none) to your reading prescription via all points in between. My bike computer is a bit far away for proper "reading" correction but that isn't a problem with vaifocals.

The 2 basic choices are whether you get the lenses built in to the glasses (I think that is the only choice with optilabs) or whether the glasses part is a separate clip-in part. The clip in route tends to be more expensive but you can have whatever sunglasses lenses you want (I have Rudy Project Rydons with a varivocal clip in &, usually, photochromic lenses which go clear enough for night use.

_20190106_180712.JPG
Rydons, with optical insert, outside

DSC_1101.JPG
Rydons, with optical insert, inside

A slight disadvantage to the 2 part setup can be a greater tendency to steam up in certain cool (but not cold) damp conditions (fog & /or drizzle mainly) . I don't find it happens very often but if it does then I just remove the outside lenses & leave the optical insert in the bare frames.

DSC_1102.JPG
Rydons, bare frame + optical insert

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:24pm
by woldsweather
Well thanks very much for all the info. Exactly why I joined CTC again and the forum. Have emailed optilabs.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:52pm
by RickH
Back on the subject of GPS for bikes I don't think there are any that will do spoken navigation directly but some will link to a smartphone to give you that functionality using the phone's speakers or connected earphones (before anyone pipes up that you face certain death if you use headphones - if you are bothered about hearing what's going on around you there are options such as only use one ear bud or use bone conduction headphones that avoid blocking/covering your ears). The (expensive) Garmin Edge 1030 is one that does. Personally I've always just relied on following the line on the screen aided by the on screen prompts when I've been following a specific route.

Garmin are the biggest player in the field but there are others - Wahoo, Lezyne & Mio for example. All have their own strengths & weaknesses (even between models of the same brand) that you need to weigh up before deciding what to spend your money on, if at all.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 6:53pm
by Jamesh
Tbh
I find opportunities to look at the map quite welcome! I will have a list of villages in my head and when I have gone through them stop and look at the map for the next part of the route.
Gives me a chance to eat a bit of flapjack or similar!
If I am truly lost I can get the phone out for Google maps. (Network permitting!)
Works fine for me on 100mile + days.
Cheers James

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 6 Jan 2019, 7:23pm
by woldsweather
Thanks again everyone plenty there to keep me going.

Re: Cycle Navs?

Posted: 7 Jan 2019, 3:55pm
by freeflow
Locus maps,osmand both allow uploading of routes and navigation by voice command. Eyesight can be assisted by having a larger phone. For example I have a 6.5 inch screen on my phone. I also wear varifocals as I am shortsighted. IMHO one of the issues that people vary rarely mention is that vibration can make the display difficult to see clearly, hence my transition to 37mm Vittoria Hypers. I've been using my smartphone for navigating Audax upto 300km for the past five years with no significant problems.