Which Turbo Trainer

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
staituk
Posts: 6
Joined: 28 Jan 2019, 11:46pm

Which Turbo Trainer

Postby staituk » 29 Jan 2019, 3:41pm

Hi i am looking to get a turbo trainer but need some adice,

i basically what something to use on Zwift so i can also lose weight and get fit, i am 132Kg

the ones i have been looking at is the Tacx Vortex or the Elite qubo Digital smart B+

there is another one i have seen is it Elite Novo Smart Turbo Trainer from halford, which is the qubo digital smart B+ on a Novo frame

so any advice on which would be better for a beginner and someone who is rather heavy.

thanks

Farrina
Posts: 67
Joined: 26 Nov 2012, 8:15pm

Re: Which Turbo Trainer

Postby Farrina » 30 Jan 2019, 2:37pm

Possibly not exactly the reply you were expecting, but the DC Rainmaker site is hard to beat for (exhaustive) reviews of all things cycling “tech”.

See here https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2018/11/trainer-buyers-recommendations-guide.html

Cheers

fastpedaller
Posts: 1963
Joined: 10 Jul 2014, 1:12pm
Location: Norfolk

Re: Which Turbo Trainer

Postby fastpedaller » 30 Jan 2019, 3:07pm

Some of the products are just a generic (from China), with different colours/ badges. I looked at reviews and decided to get a magnetic one as some had said fluid ones are 'better' but reported leaks. I just bought a generic one from Machine Mart(of all places) IIRC about £60 compared with £80 at the time from other suppliers. I'm delighted with it, it gives a good level of consistent (not jumpy) resistance which I can change by moving a lever, or changing the gear on the bike (or both).

Brucey
Posts: 34269
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Which Turbo Trainer

Postby Brucey » 30 Jan 2019, 4:52pm

the turbo is one thing but the bike you attach to it is another;

How the bike is fixed varies; best (IMHO) is that the trainer has a dummy hub in it. IIRC most (if not all) the good ones that work with online training programs are like this. Second best is that the turbo clamps around the QR on the bike and/or comes with a substitute QR skewer. Least favourite is that the bike is clamped through the chainstays near the bottom bracket; this isn't seen often these days but at one time was commonplace.


However all these arrangements have one thing is common; the frame sees some highly unusual loads which it wouldn't see normally on the road. The less elegantly you pedal the worse this is. Needless to say these loads can break your bike; some folk have a piece of junk bolted to their expensive trainer (little more than an old frame, handlebars, saddle and crankset) because that is all you need to train. Other things you need to look out for are

a) the effects of sweat. You will sweat (and sweat lots) if you are trying at all hard. Sweat is incredibly corrosive stuff, and just wiping it off the bike isn't enough; you need to keep it off altogether somehow (eg covering everything in a layer of tape or something) or to wash it off, else you will get all kinds of horrible corrosion problems.

b) tyres; if you use a trainer with a roller (rather than a dummy hub) then the tyre can take a real beating, worse than riding on the road because the roller is small diameter; this gives the tyre carcass a hard time and wears the tread (and/or the roller) prematurely. You can get special tyres for turbo trainers; however a lot of people just use old tyres which are already bad enough they wouldn't use them on the road; if they fail in use on a trainer then it is merely inconvenient.

For just getting a workout, almost anything will do. But for 'proper training' some kind of structure is necessary; having a program which pushes you to do intervals etc helps.

I will also put in a good word for rollers; this is of little relevance if you are just trying to maintain a bit of fitness but if you want to become a better bike rider then rollers can certainly help; to ride the rollers you need to concentrate hard all the time. The steering is usually far twitchier than normal; it is about as difficult as riding along a white line on the road, except that if you 'fall off it' the consequences are worse. Riding the rollers can teach you to spin not mash, to ride in a straighter line on the road, and not to wrestle with the handlebars; all really good things if you want to become a really good bike rider. After a winter spent doing regular roller sessions, you will (in contrast to sessions on the turbo) almost certainly find yourself pedalling more elegantly and handling the bike better. These things are difficult to measure exactly but are IMHO of inestimable value on the road.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

fastpedaller
Posts: 1963
Joined: 10 Jul 2014, 1:12pm
Location: Norfolk

Re: Which Turbo Trainer

Postby fastpedaller » 30 Jan 2019, 6:27pm

Brucey wrote: I will also put in a good word for rollers; this is of little relevance if you are just trying to maintain a bit of fitness but if you want to become a better bike rider then rollers can certainly help; to ride the rollers you need to concentrate hard all the time. The steering is usually far twitchier than normal; it is about as difficult as riding along a white line on the road, except that if you 'fall off it' the consequences are worse. Riding the rollers can teach you to spin not mash, to ride in a straighter line on the road, and not to wrestle with the handlebars; all really good things if you want to become a really good bike rider. After a winter spent doing regular roller sessions, you will (in contrast to sessions on the turbo) almost certainly find yourself pedalling more elegantly and handling the bike better. These things are difficult to measure exactly but are IMHO of inestimable value on the road.

cheers


A clubmate used to be able to remove his jersey whilst riding the rollers! His speed was phenomenal as well - we calculated close on 200RPM of the pedals!
ETA, but not whilst removing his jersey. Whilst in competition he could also pedal so fluently (and be that far ahead of the others) that he could look around at the dials and ensure he didn't use any extra effort unduly.