Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

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Samuel D
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby Samuel D » 9 Aug 2019, 2:59pm

pedalsheep wrote:If you can find a copy of 'Every Cyclists Handbook' by F H Camm published by Newnes in 1936 it covers absolutely everything from bike mechanics to building the perfect bike shed.

A quick question: does that include information on tyres? I suppose so but would like to be sure before ordering a copy.

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pedalsheep
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby pedalsheep » 9 Aug 2019, 6:04pm

Samuel D wrote:
pedalsheep wrote:If you can find a copy of 'Every Cyclists Handbook' by F H Camm published by Newnes in 1936 it covers absolutely everything from bike mechanics to building the perfect bike shed.

A quick question: does that include information on tyres? I suppose so but would like to be sure before ordering a copy.

There is a chapter on care and repair of tyres including a page of diagrams of various tyre and rim sections. Shows types of tyre but not specific brands.
The intro says 'I have endeavoured within its covers to compress all of the information which the cyclist requires for reference purposes............It is hoped that this volume will take its place as the standard work on the bicycle...........It has been my aim to include information which will appeal to the clubman, the utility cyclist and .......the lone rider.'

It is certainly a comprehensive volume. I don't know what Abe are charging, I got mine quite cheaply on EBay a few years ago.
'Why cycling for joy is not the most popular pastime on earth is still a mystery to me.'
Frank J Urry, Salute to Cycling, 1956.

Samuel D
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby Samuel D » 10 Aug 2019, 8:09pm

Thank you, pedalsheep. I’ve ordered it.

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foxyrider
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby foxyrider » 10 Aug 2019, 8:32pm

pwu wrote:When did square taper appear and how long did it take for cotter pin cranks to disappear?


Cotter pins have disappeared? when was this? :?:
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

pete75
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby pete75 » 10 Aug 2019, 9:01pm

foxyrider wrote:
pwu wrote:When did square taper appear and how long did it take for cotter pin cranks to disappear?


Cotter pins have disappeared? when was this? :?:


Not yet - just looked in the shed and six cotter pins are still in the three chainsets they're meant to be in. Was beginning to worry...... :wink:

AndyA
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby AndyA » 10 Aug 2019, 9:28pm

The Golden Age of Handbuilt Bicycles by Jan Heine is one of my favourite bike books. Not exactly what the everyman was riding but some great examples of the state of the art 1930-65

Brucey
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Re: Books that reveal historic technology trends in cycling

Postby Brucey » 11 Aug 2019, 12:15am

Samuel D wrote:
Brucey wrote:The average reader's bike then (and now) would contribute less than ~10% of the total aero drag, less than that if any luggage was being carried.

The studies I’ve seen show bicycle drag to be typically at least 20% of the total, which leaves slightly more scope for improvement by aerodynamic tweaks.


It varies obviously, but 10% was the round figure that was quoted to me in person by the current technical director of British Cycling. Most folk don't get as aero in their body position as the riders in question, so anyone that isn't 'reet doon' etc is liable to incur more body drag, and the bike will be less draggy in proportion to the whole.

FWIW one of my chums swears his new 'aero bike' is faster than his old one; I pointed out that his riding position on said steed was completely different too. The current plan is to make the riding position the same between the old and new bikes and do some science.

Watch this space.

cheers
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