Cycling dead ends.

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pjclinch
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby pjclinch » 8 Aug 2019, 10:36am

Brucey wrote:Well, er, yes and no. Clever people are not completely immune to having odd beliefs... The jury is out on oval chainrings; if they were of some real advantage and there was really science to back this up, I suspect that the entire peloton would be on them already, despite the shifting issues. It is possible that they are 'of some advantage' in that once you get used to them it is difficult to change back to something else again.


I note you're quite careful to qualify your assessments, and that's my feeling too.
I agree smart folk can be worng, but I'm also aware that devil tends to crop up in detail to the point where "obvious" things get derailed, so I tend to hedge my bets.

A thing about advantages is they can apply differently to different people. So the great debate about whether we should be stood up or sat down or running at whatever cadence, for example, doesn't seem to be a universal Thing, which leads me to think people are biomechanically different to one another. Just as Contador can mash up cliffs out of the saddle while Froome is spinning up in the saddle, it could be the case that some styles/physiologies get more out of some things than others.

Now, it might be the case that it's all in the mind, which can make a useful difference, but there again you could make the same argument for the usefulness of a St. Christopher medallion. It's particular form is not the key point, just the belief in it.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

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pjclinch
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby pjclinch » 8 Aug 2019, 10:41am

Rotor did some fancy (and expensive) cranks that changed the angle between the arms from 180 degrees as they went around (see https://www.roadbikerider.com/rotor-crank-system-d1/) as yet another dead-spot remover. Haven't heard anything about those for a while...

They make more sense than L-cranks (i.e., potentially a little bit) but their disappearance suggests a big "meh".

Pete.
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iandriver
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby iandriver » 8 Aug 2019, 10:48am

Suspension handlebar stems. Solid plastic saddles.
Supporter of the A10 corridor cycling campaign serving Royston to Cambridge http://a10corridorcycle.com. Never knew gardening secateurs were an essential part of the on bike tool kit until I took up campaigning.....

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 8 Aug 2019, 11:17am

Hi,
Eh.......They work well for small deviations unlike suspension forks.
Well I've still got one on my MTB :)
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
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mercalia
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby mercalia » 8 Aug 2019, 12:35pm

Those tyres you dont pump or can get punctures as they are in some sense solid. ANy one here ever rode on them?

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Sweep
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby Sweep » 8 Aug 2019, 1:10pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Eh.......They work well for small deviations unlike suspension forks.
Well I've still got one on my MTB :)


I can top that - the suspension hub.

http://www.atob.org.uk/bicycle-accessor ... nsion-hub/

Maybe they are still going and aren't a dead end.

But they were for me.

One came on my Dahon Speed Pro sports bike.

First time I set off from home (I am at the top of a steep hill) the front brake didn't come on.

Then I noticed that the suspension meant the brake pads had missed the rim.

The wheel had a wider than normal rim to supposedly take care of this but it still needed careful setting up.

I also found it a pig to maintain the hub.

In the end I got a conventional wheel and hub.

And miraculously wasn't shaken to death so never looked back.

That hub is one of the things which eventually made me decide that I favour standard simple proven bits.
Sweep

Ray
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby Ray » 8 Aug 2019, 4:19pm

You don't see many 'high ordinaries' on the roads these days . . .
Ray
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iandriver
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby iandriver » 8 Aug 2019, 4:21pm

Sweep wrote:I can top that - the suspension hub.

http://www.atob.org.uk/bicycle-accessor ... nsion-hub/


Wow
Supporter of the A10 corridor cycling campaign serving Royston to Cambridge http://a10corridorcycle.com. Never knew gardening secateurs were an essential part of the on bike tool kit until I took up campaigning.....

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gaz
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby gaz » 8 Aug 2019, 5:34pm

10mm pitch chain edition of Dura-Ace track and I can't recall the name but some of Mr Shimano's special pedals are featured in the link too.
Hand wash only. Do not iron.

gazza_d
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby gazza_d » 8 Aug 2019, 6:15pm

pwa wrote:Though I love the way it looks, Moulton's space frame. Too complex to manufacture economically for a bike concept that, with small wheels, was supposed to be more practical. Complex and practical rarely coincide.

The space frame concept was always intended to be a niche high end. The collaboration with pashley took the concept down a notch but it's still fairly niche.

It's a shame the F frame design went to Raleigh who then ruined it before killing it off as that was where the mass market for Moultons existed.

I still think that if that design was relaunched as a mass market bike it would sell lots. That's basically what Brompton are doing.

Bmblbzzz
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby Bmblbzzz » 8 Aug 2019, 6:24pm

KM2 wrote:Aren’t biopace rings in the correct orientation for recumbents?

They're still in the same orientation relative to the cranks, and that's what counts, isn't it?

jimlews
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby jimlews » 8 Aug 2019, 6:35pm

Another couple here:

More by way of a prophecy because unfortunately,at the moment both seem pretty well ubiquitous.

Straight forks. Especially on touring bikes. Uncomfortable fashion driven pile drivers.

"Anatomic" drop handlebars. Also uncomfortable especially when trying to use the brakes from the drops.

KM2
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby KM2 » 8 Aug 2019, 6:39pm

[quoteThey're still in the same orientation relative to the cranks, and that's what counts, isn't it?
][/quote]

Recumbents force is horizontal, df is vertical

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Sweep
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby Sweep » 8 Aug 2019, 6:43pm

jimlews wrote:Another couple here:

More by way of a prophecy because unfortunately,at the moment both seem pretty well ubiquitous.

Straight forks. Especially on touring bikes. Uncomfortable fashion driven pile drivers.

s.

Question (i don't know, not my patch) - aren't they often fitted to bikes with discs?
If so, since discs appear to be on a long-term rise, surely they will stick around?
Sweep

KM2
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Re: Cycling dead ends.

Postby KM2 » 8 Aug 2019, 7:06pm

Suspension handlebar stems......

You can always buy a Specialized roubaix where a 4.2Nm bolt holds it all together!!