Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
User avatar
Sweep
Posts: 5378
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 4:57pm
Location: London

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Sweep » 9 Aug 2019, 8:06am

pwa wrote:Carrying bags on the bike rather than on your back makes things more comfortable.

Exactly.
And the OP says they value comfort.
No way would I cycle for a day with a backpack.
I would very strongly advise using panniers on a rack for any tour OP,.no matter how short or light.
So it's important that your new bike has rack mounts.
Sweep

Pakoraboi
Posts: 10
Joined: 8 Aug 2019, 11:05am

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Pakoraboi » 9 Aug 2019, 10:21am

keyboardmonkey wrote:
Pakoraboi wrote:
keyboardmonkey wrote:How heavy, please?


I'm now 108kg but since I started training for a triathlon I am losing weight week after week. I aim to be in the 95-98kg region for my first triathlon race and touring trip


Hmm. 17 stone is a fair old weight. I should ask about max rider weights for any bike you consider - especially those with low spoke counts - given that you intend to do a little light touring.

On the subject of what to take with you whilst ‘credit card touring’ you might find a bar bag not quite roomy enough - and I don’t like having weighty stuff in mine.

As it happens I’ve recently had two separate overnight trips on my bike (with 32 spoke wheels). I used a Blackburn Outpost Seat Pack from the world of ‘bike packing’. A work in progress...


That's very helpful, thanks.

Especially the point about the spokes count. That's why I'm staying away from classic road bikes (someone here mentioned the giant contend, which has a very low spokes count so it's a no go) and preferring a sturdier adventure road. They all have more spokes and sturdier wheels than performance oriented road bikes.

According to evans cycles website, the Jamis "will typically have a maximum rider and luggage weight limit of approximately 135kgs" so I believe I should be fine, especially as I plan to be below 100kg at the time of the trip.

1 thing I could do is buy an extra set of wheels specifically for touring. From a quick research I found these https://www.stradawheels.co.uk/product/big-fella/
Does anyone have any opinions on these wheels or know anyone who's used them?

Thanks very much to everyone for your help :D

PH
Posts: 7299
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 12:31am
Location: Derby
Contact:

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby PH » 9 Aug 2019, 10:37am

Pakoraboi wrote:1 thing I could do is buy an extra set of wheels specifically for touring. From a quick research I found these https://www.stradawheels.co.uk/product/big-fella/
Does anyone have any opinions on these wheels or know anyone who's used them?

Thanks very much to everyone for your help :D

i wouldn't bother thinking about it till you see how you get on with the bike. I'd probably be more interested in the Jamis, I think it would suit me better, I'm also a heavy rider and the benefits of a lighter bike are lost on me! Other than crashing into something :oops: I've never broken a spoke or wheel, I'd have preferred 36h on the rear, but if they're well enough built 32's ought to be fine. If you're buying from the shop that recommended it, which I hope you are, ask them to stress relive and check the wheels for you, even if you pay a bit extra for it. The problems that arise from cheaper wheels is more likely to be the lack of attention they've had than the components.
If and when you do need a new or another set of wheels, there's more appropriate options at a better price than those you've linked.

User avatar
Sweep
Posts: 5378
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 4:57pm
Location: London

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Sweep » 9 Aug 2019, 10:58am

PH wrote:If and when you do need a new or another set of wheels, there's more appropriate options at a better price than those you've linked.


Care to give some indication for OP and rest of us PH?

I have the idea you might be thinking of something from Spa.
Sweep

slowster
Posts: 822
Joined: 7 Jul 2017, 10:37am

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby slowster » 9 Aug 2019, 11:20am

Since you've got an Evans near, buy this - it's a bargain and perfect* for your planned tour:

https://www.evanscycles.com/pinnacle-dacite-1-2019-touring-bike-EV318241

When you you start training, you won't get any significant benefit from a lighter more race oriented bike. A touring bike will enable you to get plenty of good quality training miles in, and do it in relative comfort. That will help you get faster much more effectively (i.e. by getting fitter and probably losing weight in the process) than buying a bike that is more race oriented. It's a relatively heavy bike to race, but that is inconsequential set against your own weight. Moreover, if a race has a flat profile with few if any hills, the weight of the bike (and your own weight) is far less important.

As you get fitter and closer to the actual race, you can experiment with things that will increase speed, e.g. buy and fit some tri-bars to the handlebars, and maybe experiment with lowering the handlebars for a more aero position, fit some narrower/faster tyres (the internal rim width is 21mm, so I think you would be able to fit a 28mm race tyre), and maybe switch the rear cassette for a closer ratio one if you start to find that the jumps in the gears are too large when you are going absolutely flat out. Finally you can remove the mudguards and rack for the race to get that extra bit of speed.

* Edit - I've just realised it's got 32 spoke wheels instead of 36, which is less than ideal for your weight. However, one of my reasons for suggesting the bike is that since Evans are local to you, you should be able to go back to them and get the wheels re-trued if your weight results in them going out of true. As you ride it (just touring, not even training), you should find that you get fitter and lose weight without consciously trying to do so. So even if you have problems with the wheels going out of true early on, that should stop happening after you've lost a bit of weight.
Last edited by slowster on 9 Aug 2019, 12:15pm, edited 5 times in total.

PH
Posts: 7299
Joined: 21 Jan 2007, 12:31am
Location: Derby
Contact:

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby PH » 9 Aug 2019, 11:24am

Sweep wrote:
PH wrote:If and when you do need a new or another set of wheels, there's more appropriate options at a better price than those you've linked.


Care to give some indication for OP and rest of us PH?

I have the idea you might be thinking of something from Spa.

Well, for the OP it's a question best asked when the time arises, they may have come to some different conclusions about the bike, their riding and the wheels. It could well be that they decide that the original wheels suit their style of touring, and they'd like a lighter set for triathlon, or they'd like to try camping and want something bombproof.
Whatever they decide, the builder is IMO the most important aspect, yes of course choosing the right components is also critical, but if you've chosen the right builder then they'll be able to guide you on that as well. What they'll certainly do is stop you buying a rim braked wheelset, like the one linked, for a disc brake bike! Spa do have a good reputation, I have three wheels from them, but they're far from the only option, if someone is lucky enough to have a good local wheelbuilder, that'd usually be my preference, all other things (Like price) being equal.

Pakoraboi
Posts: 10
Joined: 8 Aug 2019, 11:05am

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Pakoraboi » 9 Aug 2019, 11:36am

PH wrote:or they'd like to try camping


ha ha ha...well..camping is probably in the top 3 of things I hate the most so I can already exclude that 100% :D

But yeah, I see your point: buy the bike with the best quality and components given my budget, and see how I get on with it. And worry about what may happen in the future...in the future :D

keyboardmonkey
Posts: 608
Joined: 1 Dec 2009, 5:05pm
Location: Yorkshire

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby keyboardmonkey » 11 Aug 2019, 7:03am

Pakoraboi wrote:
keyboardmonkey wrote:
Pakoraboi wrote:
I'm now 108kg but since I started training for a triathlon I am losing weight week after week. I aim to be in the 95-98kg region for my first triathlon race and touring trip


Hmm. 17 stone is a fair old weight. I should ask about max rider weights for any bike you consider - especially those with low spoke counts - given that you intend to do a little light touring.

On the subject of what to take with you whilst ‘credit card touring’ you might find a bar bag not quite roomy enough - and I don’t like having weighty stuff in mine.

As it happens I’ve recently had two separate overnight trips on my bike (with 32 spoke wheels). I used a Blackburn Outpost Seat Pack from the world of ‘bike packing’. A work in progress...


That's very helpful, thanks.

Especially the point about the spokes count. That's why I'm staying away from classic road bikes (someone here mentioned the giant contend, which has a very low spokes count so it's a no go) and preferring a sturdier adventure road. They all have more spokes and sturdier wheels than performance oriented road bikes...


Er, it was me who threw in that contender. It’s interesting to read the size guidance chart when you click on ‘What is my size?’ as it gives max weight guidance, too:

https://images.giant-bicycles.com/b_whi ... gsheet.jpg

This extract is interesting...

0F6D877D-BEB8-4AD4-AE0C-CECA0EF895E0.jpeg

... particularly as Giant apparently offer a rack mount for the D-Fuse seat post:

97DC0CB9-C732-441E-9470-FDB2A2E2069F.jpeg

Hmm. Good luck with your search.

dim
Posts: 88
Joined: 12 May 2019, 5:59pm

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby dim » 11 Aug 2019, 3:41pm

I opted for 2nd hand, but looked at classic/vintage touring bikes that are regarded by many as very good

There were 3 bikes that stood out for me, namely a 1980's Miyata 1000 , a 1980's Trek 720 and a 1980's Specialized Expedition.

I was fortunate enough to find a 1985 Miyata 1000 in mint condition from an Ebay seller in Germany. I paid £560 which included shipping from Germany (The guy built a crate and had the bike shipped from Germany in a Lorry)

I'm well pleased. The bike has front and rear racks, mudguards, 36/40 spoked wheels, triple butted tubing, long wheel base etc etc and is in mint original condition (it even came with the original Miyata Radial tyres)

I'm in the process of spending some money (lots) on the bike as I will be using it for touring and for some Audax rides. I've changed the mudguards to wider Honjo mudguards (which will now allow me to use tyres up to 38mm wide), and I'm in the process changing the wheels to HED Belgium Plus rims (32/32) with Son 28 dynamo hub and lights, .... This will allow me to use tubeless tyres up to 38mm wide .... I'm also changing the rear rack to a stronger Tubus rack etc etc and will buy Ortlieb bags

I have a few short tours planned (mainly fishing along the UK coast) but my main tour will be a wild camping/fishing tour along the west coast of Ireland in April/May next year. I will also take a DJ Mavic Pro drone and use the drone to drop off some larger baits in deeper water. (I love sea fishing and used to fish most days when I lived in South Africa)

so.... my advice is look at older touring bikes and you may get something really good for your money. I've owned a Surly LHT but this Miyata is much faster and just as comfortable on long rides.(I've had a proper bike fit done here in Cambridge (STT 3D motion capture bike fit )... well worth the money (bike fits me like a glove)

bikes that I would look for are Miyata (not Koga Miyata), 1980's Trek, Univega,Panasonic, Mercian Touring Bikes, Bob Jackson etc etc .... it also pays to look on ebay sites in Germany, USA, France etc (on ebay UK, only bikes that are listed in the UK appear unless a seller from another country lists it as worldwide .... if you find what you are looking for, message the seller and ask if he will ship to the UK)

Pakoraboi
Posts: 10
Joined: 8 Aug 2019, 11:05am

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Pakoraboi » 12 Aug 2019, 9:27am

keyboardmonkey wrote:
Er, it was me who threw in that contender. It’s interesting to read the size guidance chart when you click on ‘What is my size?’ as it gives max weight guidance, too:

https://images.giant-bicycles.com/b_whi ... gsheet.jpg

This extract is interesting...

0F6D877D-BEB8-4AD4-AE0C-CECA0EF895E0.jpeg
... particularly as Giant apparently offer a rack mount for the D-Fuse seat post:

97DC0CB9-C732-441E-9470-FDB2A2E2069F.jpeg
Hmm. Good luck with your search.


Thanks, this is very helpful.

Apologies if I came out too strong, it was not my intention :D

As I said, I'm a total cycling newbie so you can probably understand my confusion: seems as a general rule, if you are a heavy rider, you need wheels with lots of spokes, which made me rule out the giant because especially on the front wheel has got quite a low spokes count compared to others.

Having said that, you now pull out this very interesting max weight guidance which makes me thing I could be ok with the contend weight wise. I'm super confused :?

Pakoraboi
Posts: 10
Joined: 8 Aug 2019, 11:05am

Re: Bike advice: one bike that does it all?

Postby Pakoraboi » 19 Aug 2019, 3:50pm

Update: it looks like finding a good road bike that is good enough for a beginner, fast enough for doing a triathlon on it and also comfy enough for some light touring is quite difficult. Therefore I am "ditching" the touring aspect.

Also, the Jamis I was looking at is out of stock now. Nevertheless, I have my eyes on a Bianchi Via Nirone Allroad Sora 2019.
Similar price to the Specialized Diverge, but specs seem better and the look/design so much more captivating.

Thoughts? Anyone has any experience with the Bianchi?

PS: Also, now the giant contend sl1 is down from £1000 to £849 so that's something to consider as well

Thanks :)