Fixie: Why? Why not?

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
User avatar
RickH
Posts: 4755
Joined: 5 Mar 2012, 6:39pm
Location: Horwich, Lancs.

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby RickH » 10 Nov 2019, 7:47am

fossala wrote:Just checked Strava, my commute is on fixed and entails 1300ft of climbing in 10miles, this include something that is around 20% as well. It's doable as I do it 4 days a week.

You must be fitter &/or more bloody minded than me!

My cadence on the final hill home (the 250ft in 1/2 mile) drops to 60 & below with a 24" gear. For me that is well to the bottom end of comfortable - my last 2, fairly flat, rides average cadence was 88 & 90. Heading away from home I'm unlikely to not do 30+mph, sometimes 40+, freewheeling on the downhills.

It may be do-able on fixed but would I want to - for me, definitely no!

brynpoeth
Posts: 12018
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby brynpoeth » 10 Nov 2019, 10:57am

Did have some lovely Airlite hubs many years ago, large flanges, red anodised
Entertainer, kidult, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life "597"

User avatar
fossala
Posts: 1220
Joined: 21 May 2013, 8:29am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby fossala » 10 Nov 2019, 6:27pm

RickH wrote:
fossala wrote:Just checked Strava, my commute is on fixed and entails 1300ft of climbing in 10miles, this include something that is around 20% as well. It's doable as I do it 4 days a week.

You must be fitter &/or more bloody minded than me!

My cadence on the final hill home (the 250ft in 1/2 mile) drops to 60 & below with a 24" gear. For me that is well to the bottom end of comfortable - my last 2, fairly flat, rides average cadence was 88 & 90. Heading away from home I'm unlikely to not do 30+mph, sometimes 40+, freewheeling on the downhills.

It may be do-able on fixed but would I want to - for me, definitely no!

Stupidity explains most of it.

Bowedw
Posts: 296
Joined: 22 Feb 2011, 10:26pm

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby Bowedw » 10 Nov 2019, 9:05pm

Many years ago a very knowledgeable bike shop owner suggested I convert my bike to a fixie, daily commuting was taking a toll on my drivetrain and my wallet. Freewheels where on average pretty poor life wise.
At the time I thought he was being silly and did not give it a second thought.
Fast forward more years than I care to admit to and I tried a fixie and been hooked since. My hill climbing was pretty good ,or at least was to my satisfaction, I however did not feel happy on the downhills as my speed was pretty high and did not feel in control. I lowered the gearing and my downhill speed and felt a much happier bunny. Obviously I cannot hit the same speeds with a following tail wind but it suits me.
There again I have only seen a upright racing trike twice, once was when I was about 12 and the other time was donkey years later. I bought one and eventually got to grips with it and it is really something special. I now alternate between it, a normal road bike and the fixie. Also a mtb but mainly on trails and fire roads.

fastpedaller
Posts: 2283
Joined: 10 Jul 2014, 1:12pm
Location: Norfolk

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby fastpedaller » 18 Nov 2019, 2:07pm

mig wrote:didn't a track kilo rider have some sort of two sprocket system?

IIRC one was a little loose and, as the bike accelerated, the chain dropped down to a smaller sprocket. not sure what happened to chain tension though!

i'll see if i can find some info somewhere.


I remember that - and ISTR it was a British rider. It had a chainwheel on each side, and if my memory serves me, it worked by having a 'back to front' freewheel on the left side. The right side had a fixed sprocket that was undone (maybe as much as feasible?). Because the gearing on the freewheel side was lower to aid acceleration, the fixed sprocket would wind on until it took over the drive, and the freewheel would be err freewheeling until the end of the trial! Whether the added weight, subsequent small drag of the freewheel and complexity made it worthwhile.... who knows?

brynpoeth
Posts: 12018
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby brynpoeth » 18 Nov 2019, 9:27pm

Done several rides on fixed, nearly 50 km altogether, it is easy but not so inspiring as I maybe expected (rode fixed quite a bit years ago)
Going down hill holding back was a bit queer, maybe my 52" gear is too low
Light and simple is good, it forces me to work a bit harder too, I shall certainly persevere, my other cycle can have a rest
Entertainer, kidult, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life "597"

drossall
Posts: 4682
Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 10:01pm
Location: North Hertfordshire

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby drossall » 18 Nov 2019, 9:37pm

52" is quite low. Traditionally, club riders typically rode 63-67" in winter. They upped that to 72" for the early-season medium gear races. Plenty of people on here will come along and tell you that they ride gears in the 70s or even 80s all the time, but I'm not as fit as them.
Last edited by drossall on 19 Nov 2019, 8:14am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
fossala
Posts: 1220
Joined: 21 May 2013, 8:29am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby fossala » 19 Nov 2019, 7:27am

I'm on 73" all year. Same for club rides, commuting and Audaxs.

Image

alexnharvey
Posts: 905
Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:39am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby alexnharvey » 19 Nov 2019, 11:38am

Is that one of those hipster sleds? :mrgreen:

User avatar
fossala
Posts: 1220
Joined: 21 May 2013, 8:29am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby fossala » 19 Nov 2019, 11:39am

alexnharvey wrote:Is that one of those hipster sleds? :mrgreen:

Call it what you want, still did me well on an overnight 300k at the weekend. :roll:

alexnharvey
Posts: 905
Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:39am

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby alexnharvey » 19 Nov 2019, 1:54pm

fossala wrote:
alexnharvey wrote:Is that one of those hipster sleds? :mrgreen:

Call it what you want, still did me well on an overnight 300k at the weekend. :roll:


Whoosh.

It's a hipster sled when you set it up like that, or more specifically like you're going for a tt, just to ride around town.

mattheus
Posts: 1453
Joined: 29 Dec 2008, 12:57pm

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby mattheus » 19 Nov 2019, 3:35pm

Aaah, the joys of fixie jargon ... :D

Pneumant
Posts: 145
Joined: 7 Oct 2010, 8:25pm

Re: Fixie: Why?

Postby Pneumant » 19 Nov 2019, 9:29pm

brynpoeth wrote:Done several rides on fixed, nearly 50 km altogether, it is easy but not so inspiring as I maybe expected (rode fixed quite a bit years ago)
Going down hill holding back was a bit queer, maybe my 52" gear is too low
Light and simple is good, it forces me to work a bit harder too, I shall certainly persevere, my other cycle can have a rest


Easy enough to change the sprocket if it feels too low & well worth experimenting. I can get up some serious hills on my 66" gear without too much suffering. No shame in jumping off and pushing if the hill wins as you can justifiably blame the bike.........
I rode the fixed last Saturday and the chain was making horrible groaning sounds at the end of a damp 50-mile ride. I am using up cheapo Wilkinsons chains purchased for silly low money (as in 60p each or something like that) a couple of years ago. They are 1/8 pitch black unlubed (from the factory) Tayas and fixed destroys them in the hundreds of miles. They must be very low grade metal. I have 2 left and the next batch of chains will be KMC's!

seph
Posts: 133
Joined: 3 Sep 2010, 8:22pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby seph » 20 Nov 2019, 11:04pm

https://i.redd.it/s01ev4375gz31.jpg
I like the look of your Corrado Fossala. Was it originally a track frame? If so, how do you find the geometry for longer rides?
I have an old Steve goff track frame that Ive thought about using for long distance stuff, just not sure that I’d find it as comfy as the converted touring frame that I normally use, (and I do like to run mudguards too :lol: )

tatanab
Posts: 3861
Joined: 8 Feb 2007, 12:37pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby tatanab » 21 Nov 2019, 7:40am

Apart from my track racing/time trial machine I have always (since 1969) had a road/track machine in my stable i.e a "track" frame with mudguard eyes and clearance. Below is the current one since 1988. As youngsters we generally rode 72" until we learned to pedal and then dropped the gear to 65". This was around the South Downs. I have toured central Wales and Normandy/Brittany on 65" as well as general club riding and commuting. I like the slim understated elegance (to my eyes) of old frames over the fat tubed lardy modern aluminium frames. Modern trendy riders seem to routinely ride gears in the range that I used for racing, 81" to 86", but perhaps they ride at my old racing speed :wink: .

100_1143.JPG