Fixed wheel: Why? Why not? Vote now please!

For discussions about bikes and equipment.

Fixie: Why? Why not?

Fixed is my first choice
9
23%
Love fixed, love freewheel
10
26%
Used to ride fixed, no more
2
5%
Not tried fixed. Yet
6
15%
Fixed where suitable
1
3%
Fixed in winter
0
No votes
Fixed when I was young and free
1
3%
Freewheel only, lots of gears
5
13%
Prefer single freewheel
4
10%
Love to try fixed with gears
1
3%
 
Total votes: 39

alexnharvey
Posts: 1440
Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:39am

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby alexnharvey » 6 Mar 2020, 11:38am

You can buy a 20, 21 or even a 22 tooth sprocket if you like.

Brucey
Posts: 42167
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Brucey » 6 Mar 2020, 11:44am

for fixed gear use on the road, normally I use between 65" and 72". In days gone by I would average about 20mph on that gear, pedalling quite quickly. These days however I think the legs lack the souplesse and the lungs are not that much cop either, so it is slower than that, but the same gearing.

My hack bike currently has 46/18 gearing on it (700C wheels and an IGH). I spend most of my time in the direct drive gear (about 68") and start off/climb hills in the next lowest one, which is around 55".

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14917
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Railway Cuttings East, Leafy Suburbia

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 6 Mar 2020, 12:19pm

42/24, 28" wheel

49" exactly, just checked
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

mig
Posts: 2320
Joined: 19 Oct 2011, 9:39pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby mig » 6 Mar 2020, 12:45pm

:shock: i just couldn't pedal that for long. sounds like one of those winter training regimes of yesteryear when you hit this time of year with mega leg speed but no strength.

winter gear - 48x21
usual gear - 48x17
track bike gear for summer road rides 49x14

i agree though in going back to gears after riding fixed takes a little adjustment. i find that there is a moment when i think that i should be slowing down when i ease on the pedals slightly and find i have to grab for the brakes as i'm not!! :D

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14917
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Railway Cuttings East, Leafy Suburbia

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 6 Mar 2020, 1:22pm

Fortunately I brake with my feet only in both cases
My Gillott has a bigger fixed gear, 59", but it is in semi-retirement, it worked hard enough for many years. My daily fixie bike has fat 28" tyres
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

tatanab
Posts: 4328
Joined: 8 Feb 2007, 12:37pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby tatanab » 6 Mar 2020, 1:34pm

mig wrote:winter gear - 48x21
usual gear - 48x17
track bike gear for summer road rides 49x14

All year gear of 65" 48x20. General club riding and even touring in central Wales or Brittany ----- when I were a lad 30+ years ago.
Time trial and track gearing of 81" or 86" 48x16 or 15. Tried 48x14 just once when back off tour but could not get "on top" of the gear. Preferred flat road cadence 90 - 100 rpm. When I rode fixed almost exclusively (30 years ago) I could touch but not sustain 200 rpm on a descent. On a 65" gear that is 40mph. These days I am severely pushed to reach 150rpm because I ride the fixed only seldom.

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14917
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Railway Cuttings East, Leafy Suburbia

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 6 Mar 2020, 1:39pm

I pedal relatively fast but I think I should find 200 rpm terrifying, I want to be in control :?
I did count my revs between two kilometre posts to check the gear, but one does not ride exactly straight, I got maybe 2% more, does that mean I should up my mileages by 2% compared to the map?
Certainly sticking to fixed for most rides, no knee problems now
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

drossall
Posts: 5099
Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 10:01pm
Location: North Hertfordshire

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby drossall » 6 Mar 2020, 2:17pm

I think club riders typically wintered on 63-66" fixed (or around that). Then the season would start with 72" medium-gear 25-mile events, in which some could beat the hour (i.e. 25mph). I use around 65-67", and I'm not fast. I don't do 200rpm downhill, as my legs won't go that fast; I just keep it steady with the brakes and/or pedals.

Obviously it all depends on fitness, terrain, riding style and preference. I'm not that fit, but it's not that hilly round here.

This is good for gear calculations.

mig
Posts: 2320
Joined: 19 Oct 2011, 9:39pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby mig » 6 Mar 2020, 8:54pm

do people tend to pedal differently on fixed? i do. try to pedal more lightly, less stompily. seems to work for me.

rode a '10' once on 55x15. the chainring only just missed the chainstay. it wasn't even a particularly flat course! not sure that i could push that gear these days.

i'm going to assess the chain on the winter commuter tomorrow. most likely it's being changed. it has seen some real wet weather this time around. very dirty, flooded roads for miles and miles. i've got a feeling it's new chainring and sprocket time too.

drossall
Posts: 5099
Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 10:01pm
Location: North Hertfordshire

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby drossall » 6 Mar 2020, 9:00pm

It was always reckoned to train you in smoother pedalling. Dunno whether it's true :D

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14917
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Railway Cuttings East, Leafy Suburbia

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 6 Mar 2020, 9:17pm

I certainly believe that
Makes one work a bit harder, my 49" gear stops me going too fast :wink:
By pushing back one can brake instantly, with a back-pedal brake it takes a moment longer
With a 49" gear: 103 rpm = 15 mph, that is plenty
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

mig
Posts: 2320
Joined: 19 Oct 2011, 9:39pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby mig » 8 Mar 2020, 7:14pm

mig wrote:do people tend to pedal differently on fixed? i do. try to pedal more lightly, less stompily. seems to work for me.

rode a '10' once on 55x15. the chainring only just missed the chainstay. it wasn't even a particularly flat course! not sure that i could push that gear these days.

i'm going to assess the chain on the winter commuter tomorrow. most likely it's being changed. it has seen some real wet weather this time around. very dirty, flooded roads for miles and miles. i've got a feeling it's new chainring and sprocket time too.


chain swap done. a new KMC. the old chain was clean and well lubed last weekend but over the past week has been subjected to the local council launching down stacks of road salt. i always think that they use it all up in march so that it's all gone at the end of the financial year. it really had rusted quite badly in 6 days. the new one runs happily on the old chainring and sprocket. surprising really as they've been hammered over two winters now.

funny how the mind plays tricks. i thought i had a 21T sprocket on this bike but ,when i cleaned it off, it's a 20T. i think i changed it to that when i used a larger volume tyre on the back with clearance issues at the chainstays.

pressure question. this hub has a tiny hole drilled into the shell. one just big enough to get the tip of a dualco grease gun inside. i took the chance to pump a bit more grease inside as it's has been so wet for months and was surprised to see how well the old, filthy grease was pushed out of the sides of the hub. i wouldn't have thought that a small grease gun would generate that sort of oomph. the hub seals aren't good though so it needs a constant flow of fresh to run well. it's a nice job to do though. satisfying.

Brucey
Posts: 42167
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Brucey » 8 Mar 2020, 7:47pm

IIRC correctly, the piston a dualco grease gun is about 5/32" diameter, or about 1/41 sq.in. If so a 10lb load on the piston makes a pressure of over 400psi, which is plenty enough to force grease just about anywhere.

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 14917
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Railway Cuttings East, Leafy Suburbia

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby Cyril Haearn » 8 Mar 2020, 7:54pm

alexnharvey wrote:You can buy a 20, 21 or even a 22 tooth sprocket if you like.

Should be able to get fixed sprockets free, most flipflop hubs are used the wrong way round, only the freewheel is used :wink:
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon, PoB, 30120
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we hate bullies

mig
Posts: 2320
Joined: 19 Oct 2011, 9:39pm

Re: Fixie: Why? Why not?

Postby mig » 9 Mar 2020, 12:19pm

Brucey wrote:IIRC correctly, the piston a dualco grease gun is about 5/32" diameter, or about 1/41 sq.in. If so a 10lb load on the piston makes a pressure of over 400psi, which is plenty enough to force grease just about anywhere.

cheers


interesting. it certainly pushed the old stuff out well. ran quietly this morning too.

i'm running low on grease at the mo so must dig up that old thread on which to buy :D