Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

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mikethelad
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Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby mikethelad » 16 Jan 2020, 2:08pm

Hi, I have recently switch to Continental Grand Prix 4 Season Folding Road Tyre as I commute to work all year, I am using Continental Quality Road Long Valve Inner Tube which are good, but I have had a few punctures, is it just the time of year or is there a better inner tube I can use to be more resistant. Am running them at 150psi and regular checks.

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fausto99
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby fausto99 » 16 Jan 2020, 3:14pm

Check this out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asEYkpW0vwQ and reduce your tyre pressures

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby PDQ Mobile » 16 Jan 2020, 3:19pm

I would have thought the tyre is far far more relavent?
I suppose a thicker walled tube may give some additional protection against full penetration by a short thorn etc, but it will be pretty minimal and make a heavier wheel.
At those stated high pressures the tube is forced againt the casing with .... 150 pounds per square inch!

roubaixtuesday
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby roubaixtuesday » 16 Jan 2020, 3:31pm

mikethelad wrote:Hi, I have recently switch to Continental Grand Prix 4 Season Folding Road Tyre as I commute to work all year, I am using Continental Quality Road Long Valve Inner Tube which are good, but I have had a few punctures, is it just the time of year or is there a better inner tube I can use to be more resistant. Am running them at 150psi and regular checks.


Inner tube will make no difference.

Unless that's a typo you're way over pressure.

https://www.conti-tyres.co.uk/road-and- ... x-4-season

mikethelad
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby mikethelad » 16 Jan 2020, 3:55pm

Thanks, I am sure I found a calculator saying 150psi as I way 120KG

Jdsk
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby Jdsk » 16 Jan 2020, 4:05pm

SNAP!

Manufacturer's recommended pressures: https://www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/tires/race-tires/grand-prix-4-season.

Jonathan
Last edited by Jdsk on 16 Jan 2020, 4:06pm, edited 1 time in total.

Marcus Aurelius
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby Marcus Aurelius » 16 Jan 2020, 4:05pm

The tyres are the issue, not the tubes. If you take the cores out of the tubes, and put a few millilitres of this

https://www.wiggle.co.uk/stans-no-tubes ... gIzcvD_BwE

In the tubes, then replace the cores, you may get a bit of protection from punctures, but not much. I personally don’t rate any of the Continental tyre range particularly highly, because I consider them to be bad value for money, given their lack of durability ( in my experience). I’d personally recommend something like these.


https://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/sto ... reId=10001

For riding at this time of the year. They aren’t quite as free rolling as the Continentals, but they are pretty much bomb proof, especially if you pair them with sealant tubes.
Last edited by Marcus Aurelius on 16 Jan 2020, 4:23pm, edited 1 time in total.

Marcus Aurelius
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby Marcus Aurelius » 16 Jan 2020, 4:09pm

mikethelad wrote:Thanks, I am sure I found a calculator saying 150psi as I way 120KG


There aren’t many road clinchers and tubes that will take 150 psi, and then actually not blow out, if you ride them on a road.

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mjr
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby mjr » 16 Jan 2020, 4:36pm

Marcus Aurelius wrote:
mikethelad wrote:Thanks, I am sure I found a calculator saying 150psi as I way 120KG


There aren’t many road clinchers and tubes that will take 150 psi, and then actually not blow out, if you ride them on a road.

Assuming that the calculator is correct, you remembered to split your weight between the two wheels and you want to keep following it, then it seems like your safe choice are to use some of those few tyres, or use wider tyres until you lose enough weight to bring the pressure below the limit.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
All the above is CC-By-SA and no other implied copyright license to Cycle magazine.

flat tyre
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby flat tyre » 17 Jan 2020, 7:29am

I've not had very good puncture resistance from Continental 4 seasons, I use Schwalbe Durano Plus in the winter. You should check the rim pressure rating as at 150psi you may be exceeding it.

mcshroom
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby mcshroom » 17 Jan 2020, 9:55am

What size tyres are they? Also, what has been the cause of the punctures you've had?

I would suggest dropping the tyre pressure a bit. For reference, I weigh around the same as you and my bike this morning had 90psi front/100 psi rear at 25mm*. I don't remember ever getting a snakebite puncture with that arrangement. Going much higher makes the ride so harsh it feels like my bike is rattling apart.

I tend to think the calculators are optimised for smaller, more 'normal' cyclists, and overestimate the pressure required as you get heavier.

*Tyres are Vittoria Zaffiro Pro (f), Schwalbe Durano DD (r)

pwa
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby pwa » 17 Jan 2020, 9:55am

120psi is the max for that tyre and if you don't want to shake your fillings loose you go a bit lower than that.

I consider that tyre reasonably puncture resistant in summer and outside the hedge cutting season, but it is a reasonably lightweight tyre and you shouldn't expect too much from it.

mikethelad
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby mikethelad » 17 Jan 2020, 10:19am

Thanks for your advice, I only got the bike last year, Giant OCR2, it came with 700 x 23 tyres, when I replaced with the Continental Grand Prix 4 Season, I went to 700 x 25

I will reduce the pressure to around 110 and see how it goes.

pwa
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby pwa » 17 Jan 2020, 10:40am

mikethelad wrote:Thanks for your advice, I only got the bike last year, Giant OCR2, it came with 700 x 23 tyres, when I replaced with the Continental Grand Prix 4 Season, I went to 700 x 25

I will reduce the pressure to around 110 and see how it goes.

As your body weight is more on the back tyre some people keep that a little firmer than the front. You may actually find that on anything but the smoothest tarmac you roll a bit faster on tyres that are not rock hard.

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andrew_s
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Re: Best Inner Tube to prevent punctures.

Postby andrew_s » 17 Jan 2020, 10:48am

If you want puncture resistant inner tubes, they should be as large as the tyre - so that the diameter when pumped up as far as just being round, outside the tyre, matches the inside of the tyre. That may mean putting a 28-35 or 32-40 tube in a 25 tyre.
If you go too large, the tube will end up with folds and creases inside the tyre, which will eventually rub through.

Using the larger tube means the tube isn't stretched when it's inside the tyre, so if something gets through the tyre and tube, that something plugs the hole it's just made, leaving not much of a gap for air to get through. This means that a reasonable proportion of your punctures leak slowly enough that you can fix the puncture at home, and also that any sealant you may put in the tube stands a good chance of working properly (where "properly" means as well as in a tubeless tyre). Thorns make pretty good plugs, and can give up to 3 days between pressure top-ups being needed, even without sealant.

Using a regular size tube, which will be stretched inside the tube, the tube rubber pulls away from the puncturing object, leaving a big gap for the air to rush through, so the tyre goes flat more or less straight away. If there's sealant, it doesn't seal until a lot of pressure is lost, and then pumping the tyre back up re-stretches the tube, breaking the seal that the sealant made.

The disadvantage of larger tubes is that they weigh more, and take up more space in your saddle pack or wherever.

If you're heavy, the best action is to go for larger tyres, and only jack the pressure over the limit on the side of the tyre when the bike frame or brakes won't allow a larger tyre, and you're still getting the odd snakebite puncture.
As far as snakebites go, riding style has quite a large impact on the chances of getting one. If you "ride light", with the larger part of your weight being supported by your legs and the pedals, allowing the bike to move about beneath you, you'll get a lot fewer than if you sit in the saddle like a sack of potatoes, and only put as much force into the pedals as is required to make the bike go. I (90 kg) would often let my 28 mm (26.5 actual) tyres get down to 50 or 60 psi before pumping them up, and T.Boonen esq. would race the Paris-Roubaix cobbles on 30 mm tyres at 60 psi.