which Pump

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De Sisti
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Re: which Pump

Postby De Sisti » 26 Jan 2020, 8:15am

NickJP wrote:I prefer frame pumps, as they actually work - I've lost count of the number of times on group rides that someone with a puncture and a mini-pump has borrowed my frame pump to get their tyre back to pressure.

And even if your frame doesn't have a pump peg for fitting a frame pump, you can carry one like so (pump in the photo is a Topeak Master Blaster):

Image


Wrap a zip tie around the headtube, then cut it off and using the protrusion thingy as a pump peg.

pwa
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Re: which Pump

Postby pwa » 26 Jan 2020, 8:22am

My delicate bits couldn't take that saddle angle. Has the rider fallen off the back? :lol:

Attractive bike though.
Last edited by pwa on 26 Jan 2020, 8:24am, edited 1 time in total.

reohn2
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Re: which Pump

Postby reohn2 » 26 Jan 2020, 8:22am

Or a smaller size frame fit pump that'll fit in the saddlebag.
PS,BTW nice bike
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Mick F
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Re: which Pump

Postby Mick F » 26 Jan 2020, 9:11am

Hudson1984 wrote:As it says - which pump??

I have a good track pump at home but wanted something to take with me on rides. I've never used C02 before - should I?
I have an excellent Lezyne mini pump that fits in my saddle bag, and I use CO2 canisters if just out for a few hours.

Why carry a big pump?
Rarely get a visit from the fairy, so what's the point of clogging up your bike with a full-sized pump?

CO2 is convenient and quick. Cheap too if you don't go for the named brands. eBay is the best place.
The small Lezyne is a tiny track pump with a folding foot. It'll get my tyres to 100psi+ ok.

https://ride.lezyne.com/collections/han ... 7367713878
Mick F. Cornwall

soapbox
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Re: which Pump

Postby soapbox » 26 Jan 2020, 11:42am

Zefal HP frame pump gets my vote, if for no other reason than its reliability. They're heavy and unfashionable, and not all frames can take them, but whenever I'm out with anyone who gets a puncture, it's the Zefal that gets us back on the road the quickest.

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Mick F
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Re: which Pump

Postby Mick F » 26 Jan 2020, 11:48am

CO2 will beat ANY pump in the "quickest" category.
It takes a whole 1sec to fill a tyre.
Mick F. Cornwall

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Mick F
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Re: which Pump

Postby Mick F » 26 Jan 2020, 11:51am

Mick F wrote:CO2 is convenient and quick. Cheap too if you don't go for the named brands. eBay is the best place.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-CO2-CARTR ... 2749.l2649
Mick F. Cornwall

reohn2
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Re: which Pump

Postby reohn2 » 26 Jan 2020, 1:01pm

Mick F wrote:CO2 will beat ANY pump in the "quickest" category.
It takes a whole 1sec to fill a tyre.

That depends on how big the tyre section is.
I've never used CO2 cartidges but I strongly suspect I'd need a few cartridges to pump up my 29er x 2.4inch tyres and pop them on to the rim seat.
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Mick F
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Re: which Pump

Postby Mick F » 26 Jan 2020, 3:14pm

I reckon that your suggested tyre might take as long as two seconds but probably less.

When I've used CO2, there's been much more than half left. Mine are (only) 16g, but you can get bigger ones if you like.
.
They are quick and simple, and quick and simple ........... sorry, repeating myself. :D
The visits from the fairy are few and far between. If people want to take a puncture outfit and a pump with them, that's up to them.

My system is to take a pair of tubes, and a couple of CO2 cylinders ....................... plus the valve adaptor for the CO2.
Small, simple, light, sits in a pocket (if you like) - and simple and light and small.
Mick F. Cornwall

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RickH
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Re: which Pump

Postby RickH » 26 Jan 2020, 4:14pm

Sweep wrote:... Just choose the appropriate one for the tyres you are using, ie whether volume or pressure is more important.

Up til now, when there has been a choice, I've always gone for pressure rather than volume.

A pressure model will pump a volume tyre with a few more pumps but a volume one won't do the pressure if you need it any time.

My small pump is a Topeak Micro Rocket ALT which lives in my seat bag (or a jersey pocket for the rare times I don't take a bag). I bought it in 2008 & it is still going strong. It works OK on the 40mm tyres I now run as I only need to get them to 30-40psi. The T at the end of the name is because the handle end folds out to make a T which make it easier to use.

Image

If I'm taking a bag (or bags) with more space I will pack a Lezyne Micro Floor Drive.

reohn2
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Re: which Pump

Postby reohn2 » 26 Jan 2020, 4:54pm

Mick F wrote:I reckon that your suggested tyre might take as long as two seconds but probably less.

When I've used CO2, there's been much more than half left. Mine are (only) 16g, but you can get bigger ones if you like.
.
They are quick and simple, and quick and simple ........... sorry, repeating myself. :D
The visits from the fairy are few and far between. If people want to take a puncture outfit and a pump with them, that's up to them.

My system is to take a pair of tubes, and a couple of CO2 cylinders ....................... plus the valve adaptor for the CO2.
Small, simple, light, sits in a pocket (if you like) - and simple and light and small.

You could probably fit five or six of your 23mm tubes in the same area as a 700/29er x 2.4inch tube.
On that reckoning if you use say 30% of a canister of CO2 you're probably right two canisters would do it easily,so worth considering :)
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andrew_s
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Re: which Pump

Postby andrew_s » 26 Jan 2020, 5:41pm

The basic rule with pumps is that the bigger they are, the better they are at pumping, which is why everyone with any sense has a track pump at home. This applies to pumps that are the same model too, so a size 4 HPX works noticeably better than a size 2 HPX.

I use an HPX by preference, but accept that whilst frame fit pumps work well with traditional steel frames, they are often difficult with modern frames, with sloping top tubes and smooth flowing curves around the tube junctions. Often the best you can do is strap on, with a couple of Zefal Doodads

My experience is that a Topeak Road Morph works about the same as a size 2 HPX, but it's also not noticeably smaller, and "in the saddlebag" only works if the saddlebag concerned is a proper Carradice, rather than a small strap/clip to the saddle rails thing.
The supplied bottle cage clip prevents the use of a bottle at that location, but a Peak DX clip will take a Road Morph OK and still allow a bottle cage.

I don't like CO2.
Aside from the cost, wastage, and having to remember to reinflate with air after you get home, the speed advantage isn't all it's portrayed to be. Actually pumping is a relatively small part of dealing with a puncture, so you're looking at the difference between 11 minutes and 10 minutes, rather than the difference between 15 seconds and the minute and a quarter that I take to pump to full pressure.
There's also the point that the final inflation of the tyre isn't the only thing you may want gas for. You've also got to find and deal with whatever caused the puncture - if you don't, it's very likely that you'll just have to stop again a few miles down the road.
A quick feel round the tyre will miss smaller puncturing objects, thoroughly checking a whole tyre for foreign objects can take much longer than the minute or so saved by using CO2, and both will certainly miss displaced rim tape type causes.
I find the puncture in the tube by inflating it outside the tyre and feeling where the air's coming out, then line the tube up with the wheel so there's only 2 or 3 inches to inspect. The trouble with doing the same with CO2 is that you could quite easily use a whole cartridge for hole-finding.

philvantwo
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Re: which Pump

Postby philvantwo » 26 Jan 2020, 6:17pm

If you read Mick F's post again you'll note he takes a pump with him as well as co2 cylinders, just like I do and I reckon he does the same as me. Tube out, inflate with pump to find location of puncture.
Then when anything is found in the tyre reinflate with co2. You should try it instead of giving it a big no no.
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mattheus
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Re: which Pump

Postby mattheus » 26 Jan 2020, 6:25pm

Mick F wrote:I reckon that your suggested tyre might take as long as two seconds but probably less.

When I've used CO2, there's been much more than half left. Mine are (only) 16g, but you can get bigger ones if you like.
.
They are quick and simple, and quick and simple ........... sorry, repeating myself. :D
The visits from the fairy are few and far between. If people want to take a puncture outfit and a pump with them, that's up to them.

My system is to take a pair of tubes, and a couple of CO2 cylinders ....................... plus the valve adaptor for the CO2.
Small, simple, light, sits in a pocket (if you like) - and simple and light and small
.



(I also detest the waste factor of CO2:-(

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Sweep
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Re: which Pump

Postby Sweep » 27 Jan 2020, 7:37am

Excellent points above about the CO2 andrew. If folks take a pump as well as the canisters, where's the neatness/smartness in that? If they don't take a pump, bonkers in my view.
Sweep