First Wheel Building Experience

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bailout
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Postby bailout » 23 Dec 2008, 11:00pm

Cyclenut wrote:long post


Many thanks for that. I am sure your advice will be valuble to anyone reading this thread and thinking of giving it a go.

bailout
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Postby bailout » 23 Dec 2008, 11:03pm

robwa10 wrote:
Well everything went well.


Good to hear :) How long did it take you as a noob? I see someone else has asked about stand vs frame. What did you use?

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meic
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Postby meic » 24 Dec 2008, 12:10am

I use a jig so that I can work sitting comfortably at the kitchen table listening to the radio etc. It is just more conveniant and comfortable.
I do have to go back to the bike frame to ensure my dishing matches MY frame.
Yma o Hyd

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robwa10
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Postby robwa10 » 24 Dec 2008, 10:38am

bailout wrote:Good to hear :) How long did it take you as a noob?


It took about three evenings in all. When I'd get a bit tired of concentrating I'd take a break and have a cup of tea. If I was in desperate need of a wheel then I suppose I could make one in half a day.

bailout wrote:I see someone else has asked about stand vs frame. What did you use?


I've added pics to my original post of the set of forks I used for the front wheel. Below is a pic of what I used for the rear wheel. It's the back half of an old frame that cracked so I cut it in half.
I'll build myself a jig eventually for it's ease of use but the frame is more than enough.
Image

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lauriematt
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Postby lauriematt » 30 Dec 2008, 10:39am

interesting post....

i had a go a building a wheel....seeing as id learnt how to do almost everything else on a bike

but for the life of my i just couldnt get it 100% true

eveyrtime i adjusted the spokes it just seemed to put it out some where else
WHAT DOESNT KILL YOU .... CAN ONLY MAKE YOU STRONGER

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frank9755
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Postby frank9755 » 30 Dec 2008, 11:41am

I built my first wheel yesterday, using a combination of Sheldon Brown and this thread for guidance and inspiration - thanks to all those who have posted above.
My first attempt at lacing it went well but finished with all the trailing spokes being about 1cm too long. I was about to give up and order shorter spokes, when I looked again and realised I had laced it wrongly - having only done 2 crosses instead of three.
The second attempt took a bit more pulling but finished up looking a lot better. I put it in the upturned forks and, I'm sure through beginners luck, it was very close to true, so I've left it to settle and will check it again at the weekend!

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Mick F
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Postby Mick F » 30 Dec 2008, 12:30pm

frank9755 wrote: I've left it to settle and will check it again at the weekend!


That is my method. I do a bit, then leave it alone to come back later or the next day. It makes for a slow process, but it's slow but sure.

I find that if I rush at it, I chase my tail round and round turning spokes this way and that. Leave off and change the subject, come back later seems to work for me.

Maybe that what Lauriematt should do.

lauriematt wrote:but for the life of my i just couldnt get it 100% true ..... eveyrtime i adjusted the spokes it just seemed to put it out some where else



BTW, I built mine up in September, and they're still true, and not needed tweaking! Good eh?
Mick F. Cornwall

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robwa10
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Postby robwa10 » 13 Jan 2009, 8:29am

Thought I'd update on how the wheels performed after 50 or so miles of use. After my first ride, about 15 miles, I checked the wheels when I got back and whoops I found one or two loose spokes on both front and rear. I must say I had erred on the side of caution with my tension and that was the problem. I put some more tension into both wheels, surprised at how much you actually need to put in, and haven't had any problems since. All in all I'm pleased knowing that I built them and that I saved myself at least £40 in the process. :D

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Mick F
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Postby Mick F » 13 Jan 2009, 8:34am

Well done!

I don't reckon that the money saved is the whole story.

Think of the achievement and the pride!
Mick F. Cornwall

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EdinburghFixed
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Postby EdinburghFixed » 13 Jan 2009, 9:01am

I didn't realise there was such a thing as 'too much tension'! :shock:

A few months after I got my fixed-wheel, I noticed the rear was out of true (not that it really mattered, since I don't use a rim brake on that wheel).

However I went around both wheels and simply cranked up the tension as far as I could (until I started rounding off the spoke nipples). Periodically I interrupted the process by taking bike out and riding it over kerbs to release any trapped tension. Hardly scientific but thousands of miles later I still haven't touched either wheel!

I definitely appreciate having an undished rear wheel when I hammer it into a pothole in the dark :D

This discussion is a great resource, I almost want to build myself some new wheels...

ddddddd
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Postby ddddddd » 13 Jan 2009, 1:24pm

EdinburghFixed wrote:I didn't realise there was such a thing as 'too much tension'!

When the rim cracks, that's too much tension.

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EdinburghFixed
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Postby EdinburghFixed » 13 Jan 2009, 1:34pm

That's what I mean. The idea that you can do that (other than on a carbon racing wheel) is quite surprising.

Maybe I should ease mine off... :?

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gaz
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby gaz » 26 Apr 2009, 8:35pm

I've started my latest wheelbuild.

Up until now I've done it by the rim transplant method described by CJ somewhere above.

This time I'm being a little braver and perhaps somewhat foolish, I'll find out eventually.

My new rim is a rough match for the old one in terms of the eyelet seat diameter and general shape of the cross section, judged purely by memory (I took the wheel apart some months ago and no longer have the old rim) . The hub is identical to one on an old wheel which has been used as a template.

In short I've laced up the spokes one side at a time by copying the existing wheel. This took less time than expected. I've paid no attention to the spoke lengths. This is a rear wheel but will be built close to, if not actually, dishless. I don't even know if I grabbed the spokes from the old front or rear wheel.

That's as far as I've got for now, it may be some weeks before I return to the project. Hopefully I'll get away with it.

Edit - I got away with it, phew. Lucky really as the ERD of the old rim was 605, new rim 600.5!
Last edited by gaz on 1 May 2009, 2:41pm, edited 1 time in total.

Cavemud
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Cavemud » 27 Apr 2009, 5:21pm

Just skim read the above replies so apologies if I repeat others:

I've found rims tend to become a little unstable and hard to true if you put 'too much tension' in them. But in practise too much tension is A LOT OF TENSION.

I have also noticed having now built twenty or so, that even though you think you got the tension just right, when you inflate the tyre on the rim some of the tension seems to come out of the spokes. Having read around. my understanding is that this effect should only occure when using beaded tyres and not with clinchers, but I have definitely noticed it happen with clinchers too.

I've now got my wheel building to the stage where I can build a wheel within the length of your average movie..... which is nice.......

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Tail End Charlie
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Tail End Charlie » 27 Apr 2009, 7:21pm

This was a good thread which I've only just found. I'm certainly no expert and I found the Roger Musson book on wheelpro.co.uk excellent as it explains things in easy to understand language. He also gives encouragement in a simple way.
I made myself a stand like in his book for less than ten pounds using off cuts of MDF from my local timber merchant. All in all, his book is highly recommended by me.