First Wheel Building Experience

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
spanner
Posts: 143
Joined: 24 Jun 2009, 1:26pm

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby spanner » 3 Jul 2011, 10:40pm

i learned with the alf webb/bike inn instructional video(NOW ON DVD) their method is for a rear wheel
insert the gearside spokes first first set of nine in alternate spoke holes round the hub then lay one spoke across the hub and depending which side of the valve hole the spoke hole nearest to you is you insert the spoke to the right or left of the one laid across then insert the none gearside spokes every second hole as previously then lift one spoke on the gearside and insert it into the spoke hole nearest to you and then lift four spokes on the none gearside and let three drop to the left or right depending whether it is a clockwise or anticlockwise build then count four spokes including the one from the none gearside to the next spoke hole and insert a gearside spoke then a none gearside spoke beside it so that you end up with two spokes two empty holes right round then turn over the wheel and insert the next set of spokes on the gearside these are the crossing spokes which go over two and under the third to the nearest spoke hole then repeat for the other side tighten down the spoke nipples down to the bottom of the threads and then put the wheel in the jig then get rid of your high and low spots and also try to keep it in true then start by tightening the gearside spokes only checking with the dishing tool frequently and when the tool flats are on the rim start tightening the none gearside spokes then finally true the wheel job done
this is the way i do wheels ive read other methods but cant do them that way even the jobst brant book way i cant master
bike inn run wheel building courses a three day course details on the bike inn website very popular and always heavily booked up or you could by the dvd and learn that way thats what i did just watching it over and over again
another tip is get an old mtb wheel and practise stripping and building it up this helps build up your build speed and dexterity of wheel building easy enough to get one at the local recycling place as they usually have plenty of bikes available take one off a scruffy bike thats only suitable for spares though :P

andrew_s
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Location: Gloucestershire

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby andrew_s » 4 Jul 2011, 2:33pm

If you want people to actually read that, some punctuation and CAPS would be in order.

LollyKat
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Location: Scotland

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby LollyKat » 4 Jul 2011, 8:41pm

...and some spaces between paragraphs!

tooley92
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Location: West Yorkshire

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby tooley92 » 4 Jul 2011, 8:44pm

....and a very, very deep breath to read it all in one go!
Remember folks 'A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!'

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Ash28
Posts: 580
Joined: 8 Jun 2010, 7:03pm
Location: West Midlands

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Ash28 » 29 Dec 2011, 8:51pm

Ok first attempt at a front wheel. Cobbled together a jig from some forks and some wood. I wanted some thing which could be left set up but removed from the Workmate.
The wood pointers worked well as I could scrape the rim without horrible scraping noises or damaging it
Clamped a block of wood on the bench for truing verticaly. Turned the wheel over in the forks to center the rim. I ground the retaining tabs off the forks which made this easier.
Used Sheldon for the lacing process. Struggled with some of the jargon "pulling spokes, trailing spokes etc " still not sure which is which. Got there in the end though. :D
I am going to try a rear wheel next.
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songsforpolarbears
Posts: 154
Joined: 4 May 2010, 2:02am

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby songsforpolarbears » 11 Sep 2012, 4:10pm

My first wheel building experience. I just wanted to make sure I had things correct so far. Thank you very much.

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Brucey
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Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Brucey » 11 Sep 2012, 5:05pm

if they are to be 'pushing' spokes then that is fine so far....

only 34 to go...?

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

songsforpolarbears
Posts: 154
Joined: 4 May 2010, 2:02am

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby songsforpolarbears » 11 Sep 2012, 9:28pm

They are trailing spokes. I think I have messed up, the key spoke should be the second hole to the right of the valve (because the hole just to the right of the valve hole is offset left, so I think should go to the left side of the hub.


I haven't came across the term 'pushing' spokes. Just 'leading' or 'trailing' spokes

Thank you

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meic
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby meic » 11 Sep 2012, 9:34pm

I think that your keyspoke is fine where you have it, just to the left of the valve hole.

If you were to rotate your hub fully anticlockwise within the slack the spokes are giving it then the spokes would look as if they were pushing the rim.
Then you insert the nine spokes that look as if they are pulling the rim with their heads on the other side of the flange.

If you were to use the spokes you have already put in as pulling spokes, they would obstruct your valve.
Yma o Hyd

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patricktaylor
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby patricktaylor » 11 Sep 2012, 10:52pm

This is how I do it - diagrams included (I hope they help).

Good luck with the wheels.

songsforpolarbears
Posts: 154
Joined: 4 May 2010, 2:02am

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby songsforpolarbears » 16 Sep 2012, 2:36pm

meic wrote:I think that your keyspoke is fine where you have it, just to the left of the valve hole.



I panicked because my keyspoke was not in the same place as Sheldon's! Anyway, all sorted now. I have inserted all the spokes, and I have the wheel in the truing stand. I was wondering:

what tension should my DS / NDS spokes be? (Rigida Snyper rim, Sapim race / strong spokes, Shimano LX Deore hub. 36 H. 26" wheel. To be used for commuting and the odd bit of touring.

Many thanks.

songsforpolarbears
Posts: 154
Joined: 4 May 2010, 2:02am

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby songsforpolarbears » 16 Sep 2012, 11:46pm

my wheel is true laterally and radially.

The wheel dish is out my 1mm. That's close enough, right?

105kgf NDS

150kgf DS

^ I wasn't aiming for any particular tension. It just kind of ended up that way.

I did not experience any spoke torsion (although I have experienced it in the past while truing old wheels).

I have not yet stress relived the spokes. That, plus some touch up truing afterwards, are the only steps I have left in the process.

Brucey
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Brucey » 17 Sep 2012, 11:51am

songsforpolarbears wrote: The wheel dish is out my 1mm. That's close enough, right?


-for most people, yes.

You will probably find that the spoke tensions relieve 'unevenly' i.e. will change more on one side than the other, especially on the first cycle of stress relief. This may also alter the dish slightly.

Stress relief has 'seen' and 'unseen' benefits; the former are realised when further stress relief cycles cause no noticable changes in wheel truth and/or spoke tension, but the latter includes improved fatigue resistance in the wheel, and may continue to be realised with a couple of further stress relief cycles that do not produce any appreciable outward effect.

If nothing else, such further cycles fall into the ' won't do any harm, might do some good' category.

cheers
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rich100
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Joined: 24 Oct 2011, 12:24pm

Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby rich100 » 17 Sep 2012, 2:13pm

Is that strained squeeky noise I hear when tightening the nipples the spokes twisting? or is that normal when its getting tight?

With my first set, which I haven't ridden yet as waiting to finish building the bike, I've stress relieved by pushing on the rim at different points with the axle on the ground, repeated for opposite side. Does this correct any twist?

Also, I suspect my spokes were a touch too long, I had to replace the front set for a smaller size, but I think I got away with the rear set, although the spokes are protruding into the wheel rim well. What happens if the thread runs out? will the nipple just keep tightening past the end onto the unthreaded part of the spoke so long as there is thread left against the nipple and spoke? eg the nipple half way past the end of the thread of the spoke so only half of the nipple engaged on the threads....is that possible or am I looking at it wrong? Is this perhaps the cause of the noise I mention above?

Brucey
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Re: First Wheel Building Experience

Postby Brucey » 17 Sep 2012, 2:25pm

rich100 wrote:Is that strained squeeky noise I hear when tightening the nipples the spokes twisting? or is that normal when its getting tight?
.... What happens if the thread runs out? ..... Is this perhaps the cause of the noise I mention above?


you can sometimes get a noise between the nipple and the rim, but if a (lubricated) nipple makes a squeaking sound on a spoke thread and the spoke is poking out of the top of the nipple, you likely have your answer, you have indeed run out of thread.

Both spokes and nipple vary somewhat, but most combinations allow the spoke to protrude by about 1mm and some up to ~3mm. If in doubt, check how far you can screw a similar nipple onto a similar spare spoke.

The noise BTW is probably made at least in part by 'deformation twinning' in the brass. Brass nuts on steel bolts often 'cry out' when overtightened. Other metals also undergo strain-induced phase transformations, hence 'Tin Cry' amongst other things.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~