can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

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tenbikes
Posts: 37
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 6:41pm

Re: can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

Postby tenbikes » 15 Jul 2009, 10:35am

What about spoke pattern?

I always build my wheels with the pulling spokes the same way round on both sides, then fit the front wheel in the same way as the rear wheel, ie to maximise spoke strength at the hub.

fixer
Posts: 120
Joined: 14 Jun 2007, 8:00pm

Re: can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

Postby fixer » 15 Jul 2009, 12:47pm

then fit the front wheel in the same way as the rear wheel,

I've read it should be the opposite.

In a Mavic catalogue, they recommend building wheeling wheels so that on the rear wheel, the outside spokes (heads in) at the top of the flange should point backwards. On the front they should forwards. It's to better resist the pedalling force at the back and braking force at the front.

In practice though, I doubt it'll actually make any difference
Last edited by fixer on 15 Jul 2009, 4:28pm, edited 1 time in total.

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braz
Posts: 337
Joined: 12 Jun 2007, 9:18pm
Location: Aquitaine

Re: can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

Postby braz » 15 Jul 2009, 3:56pm

Just realised that my front wheel was the right way round, but upside down.

regards to all, Braz.

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quiksilver
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Location: Cornwall & London

Re: can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

Postby quiksilver » 16 Jul 2009, 10:08am

jimmynoboat wrote:I ask (sheepishly) because I noticed, 2 miles into a run today, that my computer wasn't working. I'd fitted the front wheel the opposite way around and the 'puter magnet thing was too far from the sensor to work. I know some tyres have a direction arrow but what about the wheel itself? :oops:


Make sure its not on upside down!

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CJ
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Re: can you put a front wheel on the wrong way around?

Postby CJ » 16 Jul 2009, 1:36pm

fixer wrote:In a Mavic catalogue, they recommend building wheeling wheels so that on the rear wheel, the outside spokes (heads in) at the top of the flange should point backwards. On the front they should forwards. It's to better resist the pedalling force at the back and braking force at the front.

In practice though, I doubt it'll actually make any difference


You are right - unless the front wheel is equipped with a hub brake. With rim brakes there is no torque between hub and rim, so it doesn't matter which way tangential spokes point. A rim-braked wheel can even be built radial - if the hub flange is strong enough to withstand tension in that direction.

With a hub brake though (which includes disc brakes), the Mavic advice is correct. Shimano's advice is similar and a bit more sophisitcated, recommending that disc-braked rear wheels are built assymetric, with outside spokes sloping backwards on the right and forwards on the left.

As for the original topic: I was once on a ride where one of the participants complained within a few miles of the start that his bike seemed sluggish that day, which was weird since he'd spent the previous evening re-greasing his hubs. A little further on we noticed smoke coming out of his front hub at which the bike could not be made to go any further.

It was a while, involving water bottles, hissing steam and general merriment, before anyone could touch that hub, which when opened was found to contain only dust and some small fragments of metal that must once have been bigger and spherical. These fragments fell out from between axle and barrell and around the outsides of the cones, if you could still call them that, which were hard up against the cups, the right hand cone having depearted from its locknut and screwed its way inside.

Fortunately our chap had literally ground to a halt only a few yards from a fellow rider's house, who had a spare wheel. The moral of the story is as Andrew says, to make all your bearing adjustments on the left and leave the right cone locked up good and solid.

Those simple old hubs, without locknuts, are not a Raleigh oddity but were standard cycle engineering practice for many years. The right cone didn't even have spanner flats and was located against a ridge on the axle. The bearings were easily adjusted with the wheel secured to the right fork blade: slacken the left axle nut, turn the cone and retighten the axle nut. The snag was you had to re-adjust every time you put the wheel back in. And put it in the right way round!
Chris Juden
One lady owner, never raced or jumped.