Building up a bike

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
pubrunner
Posts: 125
Joined: 22 Jan 2009, 8:29pm

Building up a bike

Postby pubrunner » 15 Mar 2011, 2:40pm

Hi All,

I've a couple of frames in the garage, that I really could do with building up into roadworthy bikes. The frames have been sitting there for at least 18 months and it is time that I did something with them.

I've virtually all the bits I require {wheels, bars, gears} (I think!) apart from the cables; so why haven't I built them up yet ?

I've not done so, 'cos I lack the confidence and skills to do so.

Does anyone know any place in Shropshire/North Wales/Cheshire where I could either learn to get these bikes built up, or pay to get it done ?

Most of the bike shops that I visit, 'turn their noses up' at my old steeds. I went into a very well-known bike shop in Shrewsbury, to have some work done on my (roadworthy & of very smart appearance) Ellis Briggs and they seemed distinctly unenthusiastic to carry out even the smallest jobs. In fact, having been told that the bike was ready for collection, they'd not bothered to carry out a number of jobs. This meant that the bill was a lot smaller than I expected - and they could/should have made more money. On my first visit to this shop, I spoke to the friendly and knowledgeable owner, but sadly, he wasn't there on subsequent visits.

I ended up taking the bike to the Bike Factory in Chester, where an old guy (now sadly retired :( ) worked on the bike and set it up nicely.

Am I the only non-technically minded individual, who finds bike shops reluctant to carry out any work on steel bikes/frames ?

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deliquium
Posts: 2105
Joined: 9 Mar 2007, 3:40pm
Location: Eryri

Re: Building up a bike

Postby deliquium » 15 Mar 2011, 2:45pm

Hi

You could try Dewi Jones - www.cyclewales.net

He teaches several courses and runs City & Guilds. Has a fully equipped workshop and is an ace mechanic. He's a real gem.
Current pedalable joys

"you would be surprised at the number of people in these parts who nearly are half people and half bicycles"

aek
Posts: 292
Joined: 21 Apr 2010, 2:17pm
Location: Warwickshire

Re: Building up a bike

Postby aek » 15 Mar 2011, 3:05pm

You can learn by doing it yourself and forums like this.
A few websites that i find very useful as well are:
http://bicycletutor.com/
http://parktool.com/

There are tons of other sites that host tutorials and videos from which you can learn a lot!

I knew nothing about bikes a year and a half ago, but since then i learned how to put a bike together and i restored an old Raleigh Outland steel mountain bike.
Whenever i visit a bike shop i find that i'm never happy with the jobs done to my bikes or my components and my biggest problem is that most of the mechanics from the bike shops i visited really lack enthusiasm.
For that reason and for others, i started to do my own repairs and in time i acquired the tools to do it too.

If you like working on your bike and feel like you want to do it yourself, you should just do it.

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hubgearfreak
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Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 4:14pm

Re: Building up a bike

Postby hubgearfreak » 15 Mar 2011, 3:31pm

aek wrote:You can learn by doing it yourself and forums like this.


yes. just have a go at assembling one, and ask a question here if you get stuck :D

do also read http://www.sheldonbrown.com/

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Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 48198
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: Building up a bike

Postby Mick F » 15 Mar 2011, 3:39pm

Yes, diy is best!

If you are starting with a bare frame and you have no workstand, get the wheels on first. This allows you to have a "solid" surface to work with. Obviously, you need the front forks on first.

Next bits are up to you, perhaps stem and 'bars, then brakes, then seatpin and saddle. Do the transmission last.

Your main problem will be tools.

Please ask for advice on here as to what you need and what to do.

Good luck!
Mick F. Cornwall

aek
Posts: 292
Joined: 21 Apr 2010, 2:17pm
Location: Warwickshire

Re: Building up a bike

Postby aek » 15 Mar 2011, 4:00pm

Yup, Sheldonbrown is a goldmine and it covers everything there is to know about bikes!

alicej
Posts: 1301
Joined: 14 Oct 2010, 10:16pm
Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Re: Building up a bike

Postby alicej » 15 Mar 2011, 4:46pm

Yeah, just make a start and ask on here when you get stuck. I knew very little about bikes when I started riding just over a year ago, and then in October last year I bought a frame and built a whole bike myself. SO satisfying, and you'll learn as you go along - I quite frequently fix things on other people's bikes now. Can highly recommend jumping in at the deep end without really knowing what you're doing!

These forums are brilliant for it too, I've had so much help, advice, encouragement and amusement here.

Maybe also get yourself a basic book like The Bike Book too - handy when your bike and your internet are not in the same part of the house :)

Edwards
Posts: 5981
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 10:09pm
Location: Birmingham

Re: Building up a bike

Postby Edwards » 15 Mar 2011, 5:36pm

Or bring your bits to Birmingham and I will show you what to do FOC.
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar

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hubgearfreak
Posts: 8210
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 4:14pm

Re: Building up a bike

Postby hubgearfreak » 15 Mar 2011, 5:41pm

Mick F wrote:Yes, diy is best!


agreeing with me again mick :?: :lol:

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Tigerbiten
Posts: 2009
Joined: 29 Jun 2009, 6:49am

Re: Building up a bike

Postby Tigerbiten » 15 Mar 2011, 5:54pm

The other advantage of the DIY route is that you'll be happier fixing problems that happen while out on a ride/tour.
The ability to fix/bodge a repair enough so that you can get home is not to be overlooked.

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quiksilver
Posts: 275
Joined: 13 Apr 2009, 9:38am
Location: Cornwall & London

Re: Building up a bike

Postby quiksilver » 15 Mar 2011, 6:47pm

No one is born a cycle mechanic, everyone has to learn sometime. I grant you that some people maybe more mechanically minded but if you give the job to someone else you will never gain the knowledge. Give it a go, whats the worst that can happen? If you get stuck just ask on here.

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horizon
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Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: Building up a bike

Postby horizon » 15 Mar 2011, 6:47pm

I've not done so, 'cos I lack the confidence and skills to do so.


Which implies that you do have the time and enthusiasm! And you've got a garage! And you've got the bits! And you've got access to the forum! And you've got enough cash (well, you were willing to pay the shop) for tools and parts! All you need now is Radio 4, a large pot of tea on the go and the patience of Mrs Pubrunner (hmmm, that last bit worries me...).
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher

Edwards
Posts: 5981
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 10:09pm
Location: Birmingham

Re: Building up a bike

Postby Edwards » 16 Mar 2011, 8:56am

horizon wrote:Which implies that you do have the time and enthusiasm! And you've got a garage! And you've got the bits! And you've got access to the forum! And you've got enough cash (well, you were willing to pay the shop) for tools and parts! All you need now is Radio 4, a large pot of tea on the go and the patience of Mrs Pubrunner (hmmm, that last bit worries me...).


If some body does not have the mechanical aptitude for this type of thing, most want a person to explain and show them how things are done.
This does not mean doing if for them but supervising and explaining how and why things are done.
That is why some of the night school classes are full (if you can find one). They also have the tools and can explain how to use them.
It does seem to me that there is now a gap in this area that maybe the helpful forum members could fill.
If we want to we can pass on the knowledge we have gained ourselves, and help avoid the expensive mistakes we have made. Hopefully getting more people ridding.
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar

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horizon
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Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: Building up a bike

Postby horizon » 16 Mar 2011, 10:09am

Edwards wrote: If some body does not have the mechanical aptitude for this type of thing, most want a person to explain and show them how things are done.
This does not mean doing it for them but supervising and explaining how and why things are done.


You are right. There is nothing quite like someone saying "that's how you do it". Having said that, trial and error is very important and working it out for yourself builds confidence: that helpful person won't be there when you break down (in more ways than one!) by the roadside.
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher

Edwards
Posts: 5981
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 10:09pm
Location: Birmingham

Re: Building up a bike

Postby Edwards » 16 Mar 2011, 10:43am

horizon wrote: You are right. There is nothing quite like someone saying "that's how you do it". Having said that, trial and error is very important and working it out for yourself builds confidence: that helpful person won't be there when you break down (in more ways than one!) by the roadside.


Hopefully they would not have forgotten all that had been learned and have a bit more idea of why things are done to way they are. Also been told alternative fix its and the help is only meant to be a starting point. When they go away they should then have enough basic knowledge to be more confident about tackling things themselves.
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar