Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

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WrightsW5
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby WrightsW5 » 6 Sep 2011, 2:38am

I'd rather have the extra weight.

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Mick F
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Mick F » 6 Sep 2011, 1:32pm

What actually, is the weight difference between steel and CF forks?

My 531c forks weigh 692g.
Mick F. Cornwall

LANDSURFER74

Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 6 Sep 2011, 1:49pm

I want to go the other way and replace the carbon forks on my Claude Butler Levante with a set of steel forks. I have worked too long
with carbon fibre structures, and have seen so many de - laminate.
Suggestions for a set that will suit the ahead stem setup. Please.

PW
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby PW » 6 Sep 2011, 2:15pm

Landsurfer, take a ride to Clowne and have a word with Chris at Edisons. Next door to the new college at the top of Cliff Hill. I had a set of 531C made to go with the 953 he made for me. Other option might be Vernon Barker at Dronfield.
If at first you don't succeed - cheat!!

LANDSURFER74

Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 6 Sep 2011, 2:21pm

many thanks pw... I have spoken to Chris at Edisons, my carbon forks will be going there on Thursday afternoon as a pattern...
After which i will have a set of carbon forks for sale ...!??

Gearoidmuar
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Carbon forks should be banned.

Postby Gearoidmuar » 6 Sep 2011, 3:14pm

I know they don't often break, but they can without warning. A man I've often cycled with was paralysed from the neck down last week when his carbon forks snapped in mid-blade when he was descending a hill. I'm going to sell my 18month old Carbon racer as a result. I cannot bear to look at it. I was for my first cycle today since this happened, on my steel touring bike. No carbon for me ever again.

LANDSURFER74

Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 6 Sep 2011, 4:25pm

I have an aquaintance in Newtownards who time trials.
He cuts up his carbon frame and drops it in the skip every 2 seasons.
Like me he is an aircraft engineer.
He would never sell it on as he may be the cause of someones injury or worse ...
If you are unsure of the safety of a carbon frame DO not sell it on ........ destroy it!!

Gearoidmuar
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Gearoidmuar » 6 Sep 2011, 5:54pm

LANDSURFER74 wrote:I have an aquaintance in Newtownards who time trials.
He cuts up his carbon frame and drops it in the skip every 2 seasons.
Like me he is an aircraft engineer.
He would never sell it on as he may be the cause of someones injury or worse ...
If you are unsure of the safety of a carbon frame DO not sell it on ........ destroy it!!

Mine has only done 3000m or so and I've no reason to suspect it. I just don't trust carbon fibre as a material.

LANDSURFER74

Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby LANDSURFER74 » 6 Sep 2011, 6:12pm

mmmm
Hand laid top quality carbon frames will have a predictable life, either in miles or age.
The mass produced frames from China are of good quality, but have a finite life before failure.
All carbon structures have.
Aircraft carbon structures have their lives shown in hours of usage or fatigue index.
When they reach this point they are scrapped .. even if there is no visable failure mode!!
Carbon structures are strong, light and give performance advantages at the cost of duration.
TANSTAAFL.
For time trialists and road racers there is a performance advantage, but for tourists and 'sport ' riders they are just another example of the "Emperors new clothes"..

I believe..

23 years as a fast jet flight line engineer with the Royal Air Force... Tornado and Harrier carbon structures.

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Erudin
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Erudin » 7 Sep 2011, 1:51am

I was going to get carbon forks for my Thorn frame but have found the steel ones it came with so good I never bothered. When I tested it riding over some rumble strips it damped out the buzz much better than the carbon forks on my Bianchi.

This is what Thorn Cycles say in their Audax Mk3 brochure about carbon forks:

"We have a carbon fork available..... We are in two minds about recommending a carbon fork because, whilst this fork saves (on average) a whopping 600g and undeniably enhances comfort,
especially with high tyre pressures (carbon is renowned for “damping out road buzz”) the trouble with carbon is that you can’t necessarily see when it has been damaged by an impact. Our advice is to only proceed with the purchase the carbon fork upgrade, if you are prepared to destroy and dispose of the
(carbon) fork, if it is ever subjected to an impact and if you are also prepared to never lend the cycle to anybody."

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Audax67
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Audax67 » 7 Sep 2011, 8:04am

I've been riding a Ti frame & carbon fork for the last 7 years, around 50,000 km over some pretty disgusting roads and in and (sometimes) out of holes. I'm pretty impressed with the way the fork has performed, although by now it does look a little bit used.

My frame has a 1" steering tube, and since 1" forks are getting a bit rare I did a search earlier this year and found these folk:

http://www.kinetic-one.co.uk/

They do a range of 1" carbon forks and spacers. I picked one up, to be fitted as the need arises.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

MartinC
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby MartinC » 7 Sep 2011, 12:36pm

Audax67 wrote:I've been riding a Ti frame & carbon fork for the last 7 years, around 50,000 km over some pretty disgusting roads and in and (sometimes) out of holes. I'm pretty impressed with the way the fork has performed, although by now it does look a little bit used.

My frame has a 1" steering tube, and since 1" forks are getting a bit rare I did a search earlier this year and found these folk:

http://www.kinetic-one.co.uk/

They do a range of 1" carbon forks and spacers. I picked one up, to be fitted as the need arises.


This thread may be of interest to you, not a recommendation just that there was lots of relevant discussion:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=24386&hilit=1+steerer+failure

travelling
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby travelling » 7 Sep 2011, 4:52pm

I have never understood why things like this become like a chat with Steven Hawkins

It's a bike... Not a space shuttle, not a formula 1 car and not science degree

Generally...
Carbon makes more sense if you are obsessed or need ultra light weight
Steel makes more sense on tourers
Ali makes more sense on hybrids
And shocks make more sense on heavy use off road downhill

Beyond that... It has two wheels.. You pedal it.. Spend money on it if you want too.. Fitness will make your ride better than the £200 extra that did the same job as the £20 standard part

It is supposed to be fun at our level
I have the lightest bike in the world....then I put my fattest body in the world on it...the only pounds that have been lost are from my bank account

Jimmer
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Jimmer » 9 Sep 2011, 2:06pm

Er, sorry I thought the question was about a want to do this, not a request for an 'is carbon safe' debate...

I have the Ambrosio carbon fork grudgingly recommended by Thorn on my Audax Mk3. Yes, it is a lot lighter than the steel, it damps vibration maybe better than the steel but in reality the damping properties are just different. I fit it in the summer when I do more Audax rides and like to save weight so that means I get to regularly inspect the fork and its steerer, check the headset and regrease the bearings. Do I actually benefit from the weight saving? Probably not in any measurable way!!

Can you fit one? Yes - you can get steerers in both common diameters and other than that you need to choose based on the need (or not) for mudguards and to maintain broadly the same geometry/rake otherwise you can affect steering and toe overlap.

If you want to save the weight, have the money to spend and can reconcile yourself to the theoretical reduction in safety (slight, large... who knows) then go for it!

Gearoidmuar
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Re: Carbon Forks for Steel framed bike

Postby Gearoidmuar » 9 Sep 2011, 5:37pm

Jimmer wrote:Er, sorry I thought the question was about a want to do this, not a request for an 'is carbon safe' debate...

I have the Ambrosio carbon fork grudgingly recommended by Thorn on my Audax Mk3. Yes, it is a lot lighter than the steel, it damps vibration maybe better than the steel but in reality the damping properties are just different. I fit it in the summer when I do more Audax rides and like to save weight so that means I get to regularly inspect the fork and its steerer, check the headset and regrease the bearings. Do I actually benefit from the weight saving? Probably not in any measurable way!!

Can you fit one? Yes - you can get steerers in both common diameters and other than that you need to choose based on the need (or not) for mudguards and to maintain broadly the same geometry/rake otherwise you can affect steering and toe overlap.

If you want to save the weight, have the money to spend and can reconcile yourself to the theoretical reduction in safety (slight, large... who knows) then go for it!


If, as I do, you know someone well who has been paralysed from the neck within the last 2 weeks because of the snapping of carbon fibre forks, you feel obliged to highlight this "feature" of carbon forks. You also feel obliged to say "Don't go for it". It is a variable that one can do without. Steel forks can break, but apparently, they almost always give a warning.
P.S. I don't know of a single case of steel forks breaking.