SPD pedal compendium

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Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 17 Jun 2013, 9:57pm

but having said that, they are no worse than most other 'road' type pedals; horses for courses....

cheers
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niggle
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby niggle » 17 Jun 2013, 9:58pm

I have two pairs of M520s and they are superb.

I also have a pair of M434 resin cage things, but after a couple of years one of the cages has cracked. I don't like them as they are not as good as promised with flat shoes, and not that great with SPD shoes either, plus no easy way to add reflectors.

I tried a pair of cheap alternative brand pedals from SJS that were flat one side and SPD the other, and had reflectors, but apart from the fact that they were awful quality and impossible to service, they were awkward in traffic due to the random nature of which side would be uppermost when you tried to clip in (or put your flat shoe on).

I then tried a set of the SM-PD22 clip on reflector platforms on the M520s on my commuter: excellent as the weight means they always rotate so the SPD side is uppermost (I only rarely ride in flat sole shoes and then only up to a mile or so), the reflectors keep me legal at night and they really are quite robust unlike some other reflector kits for SPD pedals.

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/smpd22-auto- ... 26992.html

Image

The flat side is not that great to use though, would not recommend for any distance as they are a bit narrow and they add ~5mm height to the pedal's top surface.

Mark1978
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Mark1978 » 18 Jun 2013, 9:30am

The A520 pedals do look like a cost effective replacement for my M505's. 286g as opposed to 450g and a bigger contact area which will be good on a road bike. £29 isn't a bad price either.

reohn2
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby reohn2 » 18 Jun 2013, 9:42am

Brucey wrote:but having said that, they are no worse than most other 'road' type pedals; horses for courses....

cheers

They are if your foot slips off :shock: :shock: :shock:


Thinks........................yer right they're not..........both types aren't much use to the everyday/tourist rider :wink: .

I went from the Look system,to double sided SPD's and never looked(sorry) back,however a few years ago I bought a pair of these:- http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Shimano-PD-M3 ... 51ad158459
for if I needed to nip to town without cycling specific shoes,they lasted three rides,before being sold on.
They were as bad as going back to clips and straps,an absolute nuisance IMHO.
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Vantage
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Vantage » 18 Jun 2013, 9:54am

I also fitted a pair of them SM-PD22 platform things onto my spd's. They're quite good.
Anything under 10 miles and I cycle in 'normal' clothes and anything over, its full lycra and spd shoes and stuff. I got tired of switching pedals around all the time so these are brill. They're a pig to remove once clipped in though.
Bill


“Ride as much or as little, or as long or as short as you feel. But ride.” ~ Eddy Merckx
It's a rich man whos children run to him when his pockets are empty.

Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 18 Jun 2013, 10:52am

with the SM-PD22 adaptors, if you twist your foot when riding they will wear out on the plastic 'cleat' area. The same area will be at risk of wear/breakage if the adaptor is removed often. I think the trick is to slacken the pedal's tension adjuster before removing the adapter.

BTW although double-sided SPDs are brilliant, having spent many years riding clips and straps even single-sided SPDs don't seem too bad by comparison. PD-M324's and their clones seem a bearable compromise for multi-use bikes, but some folk gravitate towards one side usage and hardly use the other at all. It isn't always what you expect, either; a friend of mine rides 25-30 miles a day on 324's and has yet to bother using the SPDs.... :shock:

cheers
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Mark1978
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Mark1978 » 18 Jun 2013, 11:00am

Brucey wrote:with the SM-PD22 adaptors, if you twist your foot when riding they will wear out on the plastic 'cleat' area. The same area will be at risk of wear/breakage if the adaptor is removed often. I think the trick is to slacken the pedal's tension adjuster before removing the adapter.

BTW although double-sided SPDs are brilliant, having spent many years riding clips and straps even single-sided SPDs don't seem too bad by comparison. PD-M324's and their clones seem a bearable compromise for multi-use bikes, but some folk gravitate towards one side usage and hardly use the other at all. It isn't always what you expect, either; a friend of mine rides 25-30 miles a day on 324's and has yet to bother using the SPDs.... :shock:


I rode M324's on my hybrid, and wasn't that impressed by them tbh. I found on climbing there was too much 'give' in the mechanism on the upstroke meaning lost power, and while being able to unclip, flip over and still pedal through the junction was good, finding the SPD side again was rather annoying! And subjectively they felt heavy.

I bought them as my first SPD pedal which I think most people do, but I found I spent almost zero time on the non-SPD side, so no point in them for me.

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meic
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby meic » 18 Jun 2013, 11:02am

Mark1978 wrote:The A520 pedals do look like a cost effective replacement for my M505's. 286g as opposed to 450g and a bigger contact area which will be good on a road bike. £29 isn't a bad price either.



As a member of WWA* I have to point out that that weight is too good to be true.
318-330g is more like it.




*Weight Weenies Anonymous
Yma o Hyd

Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 18 Jun 2013, 11:46am

weight weenies list 317g (in separate postings) for the A520. The A600 is lighter, about 286g as shimano claim. I've seen this verified independently (but not on WW).

cheers
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Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 18 Jun 2013, 11:57am

Re M324s; if the bearings are adjusted correctly (which admittedly is rarely the case from new) then they usually hang rear claw downwards, for easy SPD enagement.

With any SPD shoe/pedal, if there seems to be 'give' in the SPD side, then this is a sure indicator that;

a) the shoe is flexing (change shoe or use pedal with peripheral support) or
b) the shoe is fouling the pedal somewhere and the cleat is not taking lighter loads, or
c) the cleat is well off-centre on the shoe, and the sole is flexing outwards and downwards. (as 'a' above or fit pedal extenders and adjust cleat).

Note that a and c will happen with any small pedal (e.g. DS MTB ones) to varying extents, but the exact way the cleat/shoe bears against the pedal is different with different pedal designs, so feel may vary slightly for that reason.

cheers
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niggle
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby niggle » 18 Jun 2013, 2:48pm

Brucey wrote:with the SM-PD22 adaptors, if you twist your foot when riding they will wear out on the plastic 'cleat' area. The same area will be at risk of wear/breakage if the adaptor is removed often. I think the trick is to slacken the pedal's tension adjuster before removing the adapter.

I use a flat screwdriver blade to lever the rear clip open to remove them, there is a gap in the back end of plastic 'cleat' allowing for this. They engage more positively with the SPD than a shoe cleat with no obvious float IME.

I only remove them a couple of times a year to swap to the other side of the pedal to guard against seizure and uneven wear of the SPD. I guess next time I should service the pedals at the same time, but they are both running perfectly.

They have done 18 months of commuting and trail riding with no obvious deterioration and have hit the deck once or twice in off road use and survived intact.

Mark1978
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Mark1978 » 18 Jun 2013, 4:31pm

Brucey wrote:Re M324s; if the bearings are adjusted correctly (which admittedly is rarely the case from new) then they usually hang rear claw downwards, for easy SPD enagement.

With any SPD shoe/pedal, if there seems to be 'give' in the SPD side, then this is a sure indicator that;

a) the shoe is flexing (change shoe or use pedal with peripheral support) or
b) the shoe is fouling the pedal somewhere and the cleat is not taking lighter loads, or
c) the cleat is well off-centre on the shoe, and the sole is flexing outwards and downwards. (as 'a' above or fit pedal extenders and adjust cleat).

Note that a and c will happen with any small pedal (e.g. DS MTB ones) to varying extents, but the exact way the cleat/shoe bears against the pedal is different with different pedal designs, so feel may vary slightly for that reason.

cheers


Thanks, that's useful information I shall mentally store for the future. Come to think of it when I changed pedals on my new bike I also changed shoes and cleats, which may account for the new pedals feeling much more attached than the old.

Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 18 Aug 2014, 11:00am

update; there is apparently a rash of XTR pedal spindle failures on the PD-M980 model

http://mtbegypt.com/articles/xtr-pedals-are-failing-en-masse-and-shimano-isnt-issuing-a-recall/

an example here;

http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=89638&sid=9ec35021afdf62821de200efa1e71353

edit and here with pictures (exact problem tbc) http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=91826&sid=9ec35021afdf62821de200efa1e71353

[edit; in above thread spindle had failed between cone and locknut; suspected hydrogen cracking at work.]

cheers
Last edited by Brucey on 8 Nov 2014, 5:02pm, edited 2 times in total.
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plancashire
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby plancashire » 6 Nov 2014, 8:48pm

I have Shimano M324 pedals bought in 2009. The right cone worked loose. As the pedals have plenty of life in them and I plan to buy more for another bike, I recently bought the eye-wateringly expensive cone adjusting tool TL-PD33, as specified by Shimano for these pedals. The packaging states that it is for M324 and the pedals have M324 embossed on the cages.

The outer spanner fits the cone, but the inner spanner DOES NOT FIT THE LOCKNUT!! It is close and sort of grips the very edge of the nut until you try to turn it, when it springs off. I tapped it with a hammer to seat it but it doesn't help. Has anyone else encountered this? Is there some sort of version incompatibility (like computers)?

By the way, the link in the main article to the Shimano web site near the TL-PD33 is dead.

Brucey
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Re: SPD pedal compendium

Postby Brucey » 6 Nov 2014, 9:18pm

that is unfortunate! Either there is a real sizing problem of some kind or perhaps your locknuts are slightly burred?

If you can measure the socket sizes on the tool and the dimensions of the locknuts, maybe you will be able to work out exactly what the problem is?

IIRC the locknuts are not made of hard steel so they could be removed and fettled if necessary.

Thanks for spotting the dead link; I found a copy the Shimano link on the wayback machine and I've updated the lead post with the link below;

http://web.archive.org/web/20120106015846/http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/tech_support/tech_tips.download.-Par50rparsys-0036-downloadFile.html/09)%20Tools.pdf

BTW I just noticed, this thread has now been viewed over 74000 times... :shock: ...is this a record? :shock: :shock: :shock:

cheers
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