Rigid forks for MTB

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Bowedw
Posts: 326
Joined: 22 Feb 2011, 10:26pm

Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Bowedw » 5 Dec 2013, 5:29pm

Can anyone help with regard to putting rigid forks on a mountain bike instead of the suspension ones which have 80 mm of travel. The bike has V brakes and is an aluminium framed Scott Yecora.
The only forks I can find are cheap ones that seem to be heavier than the suspension ones.
Just been looking at the bike and possibly not practical as there is a considerable distance from the top of the tire to the underside of the forks yoke which may look very silly on a lighter fork unless it had a similar arrangement to a Thorn Raven Tour.
Any information would be appreciated, I am thinking of it as a winter hack.

lowrider
Posts: 135
Joined: 21 Mar 2009, 2:25pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby lowrider » 5 Dec 2013, 7:50pm

Thorn MT Tura but not light or cheep it looks like a version of the raven fork.

Bowedw
Posts: 326
Joined: 22 Feb 2011, 10:26pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Bowedw » 5 Dec 2013, 9:54pm

Thanks will have a look at their website.


Brucey
Posts: 42167
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Brucey » 5 Dec 2013, 10:20pm

Kona P2 forks are an old favourite; pop up on e-bay regularly and are pretty strong.

Also worth a look are Trek 'cruise control' forks

and specialized 'direct drive' forks.

Of course the homegrown Pace forks are pretty good too.

All the above are 'suspension corrected' i.e. to replace ~80mm travel suspension forks.

Even a set of forks from a Carrera subway 1 would work OK too I think.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

mrjemm
Posts: 2933
Joined: 20 Nov 2011, 4:33pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby mrjemm » 6 Dec 2013, 9:18am

http://surlybikes.com/parts/forks/1x1_fork

Various Surly forks could perhaps work, though these aren't specifically 80mm travel- either 63mm (?) or 100mm, though in the spec below it lists 80mm and 100mm, so up to you what to believe!

And in Bike 24 (as linked above but for the Salsa ones)- http://www.bike24.com/1.php?content=8;n ... =181;pgc=0 (non disc 49.90E)

http://www.bike24.com/1.php?content=8;n ... =181;pgc=0 (Disc 59.90E).

Both listed as 80mm. I have some of the non disc, that I got through them, though they're still sitting in an unfinished project that got sidelined by my Orange... Look nice though, and am told they have a nice dampening flex (though look solid, like a curved P2).

BTW, I am using the Troll ones- http://www.bike24.com/1.php?content=8;n ... =181;pgc=0 (74.90E, though 100mm) in the Orange and really rate them, with the Anything Cage mounts too.

coast 2 coast
Posts: 74
Joined: 8 Jun 2009, 9:44pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby coast 2 coast » 6 Dec 2013, 10:05am

You can't go wrong with a pair of Kona P2 forks. I've had a pair on my commuting MTB for over a decade and they have performed fautlessly. They work as well now, as they did the day I put them on. I expect another decades worth of use out of them.

mrjemm
Posts: 2933
Joined: 20 Nov 2011, 4:33pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby mrjemm » 6 Dec 2013, 11:32am

Despite my above post, I will also say I like P2 forks- got 2 pairs on the go, and always been happy with them.

garibeet
Posts: 124
Joined: 5 Apr 2010, 11:53am

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby garibeet » 6 Dec 2013, 1:50pm

If It's a 26in bike a set of 29er forks may work. You need to measure the axle to crown length to know for sure, so from where the fork meets the headtube, to the centre line of the wheel axle. Most forks that have been mentioned here will have this measurement as part of the spec. For info I have run a set of Salsa 29er Cromoto's on a 26in bike that was for a 120 fork and that was fine, great fork also with cage mounts. If they are a little longer they may steepen the head angle a little, half to one degree should be ok, assuming the bike isn't 72deg or something already of course!
Get the tape out...
29er A-C 468mm, link. http://salsacycles.com/components/categ ... rande_29er disc only.
26er A-C 445mm, link. http://salsacycles.com/components/categ ... to_26_disc disc and V or disc only.

bod
Posts: 9
Joined: 27 Jan 2009, 5:08pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby bod » 6 Dec 2013, 2:07pm

Most P2s will be a bit too long for a frame designed for an 80mm fork. I recently bit the bullet and bought some custom forks made by Walt Works in the US, ended up being cheaper than any place I could get them made in the UK for some reason (about £200) and took 2 weeks to arrive. It's transformed the ride, steering is lovely and quick again and they're 200 grams lighter than the triple butted P2s which is a bonus.

Brucey
Posts: 42167
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Brucey » 6 Dec 2013, 4:09pm

garibeet wrote:If It's a 26in bike a set of 29er forks may work....


not with cantis....

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Valbrona
Posts: 2394
Joined: 7 Feb 2011, 4:49pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Valbrona » 6 Dec 2013, 5:58pm

You can do your homework on suspension corrected forks, but until you have done a few miles on them you will not know how they perform. Apart from that, they quite usually look stupid. And fitting a mudguard can be a problem.

For the price of a Thorn MT Tura fork you could get another bike. Road going mountain bikes have attracted the name of 'comfort bikes'. I use a Dawes Saratoga. Lots of others, mostly in 26" flavour. Or a 700c hybrid might set you right.
I should coco.

mrjemm
Posts: 2933
Joined: 20 Nov 2011, 4:33pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby mrjemm » 6 Dec 2013, 6:46pm

Valbrona wrote:...Apart from that, they quite usually look stupid. And fitting a mudguard can be a problem.


1x1sm.jpg


I don't think they look bad. And they have a hole in the crown that could be used for mudguards. If too high, and you're not a bodger, something like these could be applied-

http://problemsolversbike.com/products/fender_flute

At less than £42 (+ P&P) not a bad option I think.

Admittedly, the corrected P2s on my MTB look a tad odd at times, but I've got used to them...

User avatar
531colin
Posts: 13323
Joined: 4 Dec 2009, 6:56pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby 531colin » 7 Dec 2013, 8:26am

garibeet wrote:If It's a 26in bike a set of 29er forks may work. You need to measure the axle to crown length to know for sure, so from where the fork meets the headtube, to the centre line of the wheel axle. Most forks that have been mentioned here will have this measurement as part of the spec. For info I have run a set of Salsa 29er Cromoto's on a 26in bike that was for a 120 fork and that was fine, great fork also with cage mounts. If they are a little longer they may steepen the head angle a little, half to one degree should be ok, assuming the bike isn't 72deg or something already of course!
Get the tape out...
29er A-C 468mm, link. http://salsacycles.com/components/categ ... rande_29er disc only.
26er A-C 445mm, link. http://salsacycles.com/components/categ ... to_26_disc disc and V or disc only.


Longer forks will slacken the head angle (by raising the front)

Bowedw
Posts: 326
Joined: 22 Feb 2011, 10:26pm

Re: Rigid forks for MTB

Postby Bowedw » 8 Dec 2013, 10:08pm

Thanks all for your advice, certainly plenty of information on the options been given freely.
I sort of favour the Tura with it's curved blades.
Has anyone any idea of the Tura's weight as I may as well stick with my present setup if there no reduced weight advantage.
The suggestion of another bike is also appreciated and does make a lot of sense.
Thanks again.