think you know your bike tools?

For discussions about bikes and equipment.
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531colin
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby 531colin » 7 Sep 2012, 6:27pm

D....2 parts to one tool here, and a brake block for scale

Image

thirdcrank
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby thirdcrank » 7 Sep 2012, 6:33pm

The grey plastic ring in 531colin's latest post is for removing the body from Shimano Ultegra pedals, from when they had ordinary SPD fittings. I have one - the tool, that is and a pair of the pedals.

edit, it was the latest when I was typing, now it's the last but one.

prm
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby prm » 7 Sep 2012, 6:45pm

These tools are bringing back some memories. More so with the bikes I rode, and repaired.

Colin… The pair in C….Another guess...Pedal cone and lock nut ????

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531colin
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby 531colin » 7 Sep 2012, 7:00pm

prm wrote:These tools are bringing back some memories. More so with the bikes I rode, and repaired.

Colin… The pair in C….Another guess...Pedal cone and lock nut ????


Yes, from the earlier Shimano pedals where you took off the end cap to adjust the bearings.

Brucey
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Brucey » 7 Sep 2012, 7:35pm

Colin's;

A- brake centring spanners? (For brake locknuts, too?)
B- not sure, but is it a bearing press?? :?
C- shimano pedal tools TL-PD40 , TL-PD33 (or similar)
D- thread chasers for crank extractor threads; the BB spindle threads and the thinner part of the tool are used as a guide for the fatter part of the tool, and help prevent crossed threads when chasing.

No-one has got Brucey #1.#2 or #3 as yet. BTW I thought it might be too easy with the makers marks on them, so I admit I have photoshopped these images slightly. (In most cases a photo could have been taken which showed no maker's mark, but I didn't have one such to work with.)

Tool #1 has the pegs about 30mm apart BTW.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ChrisButch
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby ChrisButch » 7 Sep 2012, 8:05pm

Brucey's mystery 1 - I've actually got one of these, but blowed if I can remember what it was for! Like quite a few things, it's always there in the toolbox in the hope, presumably, that it might come in handy some day. I must have bought it for a reason - looks mint.

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531colin
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby 531colin » 7 Sep 2012, 8:58pm

Brucey wrote:Colin's;

A- brake centring spanners? (For brake locknuts, too?)
B- not sure, but is it a bearing press?? :?
C- shimano pedal tools TL-PD40 , TL-PD33 (or similar)
D- thread chasers for crank extractor threads; the BB spindle threads and the thinner part of the tool are used as a guide for the fatter part of the tool, and help prevent crossed threads when chasing.

No-one has got Brucey #1.#2 or #3 as yet. BTW I thought it might be too easy with the makers marks on them, so I admit I have photoshopped these images slightly. (In most cases a photo could have been taken which showed no maker's mark, but I didn't have one such to work with.)

Tool #1 has the pegs about 30mm apart BTW.

cheers


Got them all except B....I thought that might be the one!

I had hoped to get at least one of yours!

tooley92
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby tooley92 » 7 Sep 2012, 9:10pm

Brucey wrote:
spanner 2v2.jpg


mystery tool 1

tool 1v2.jpg


mystery tool 2

[edit;
spanner 3v2.jpg


mystery tool 3]

BTW I have none of these but might quite like them...

cheers


No 3 is a Campagnolo spanner for adjusting 2 bolt seat posts, the open end fits the tension nut on Brooks saddles.
Remember folks 'A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!'

Brucey
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Brucey » 7 Sep 2012, 9:35pm

tooley92 wrote:No 3 is a Campagnolo spanner for adjusting 2 bolt seat posts, the open end fits the tension nut on Brooks saddles.

correct! It is a Campagnolo #771 spanner. It fits Gran Sport and NR seat post bolts. Even with the correct tool it is an awkward job; I use a flex-headed ratchet ring spanner. The other end shouldn't really fit a Brooks saddle nose bolt, because this is actually a BSF size, but it is close enough for most folk.

cheers
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Chris Jeggo
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Chris Jeggo » 8 Sep 2012, 12:20am

This looks like a tool I threw away not that long ago, realising it was obsolete. It is a spanner for dismantling and re-assembling Suntour freewheels, Ultra-6 and possibly Ultra-7 IIRC.

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Redvee
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Redvee » 8 Sep 2012, 2:14am

Brucey wrote:
tool 1v2.jpg


mystery tool 2


Old school chain rivet pliers.

531colin wrote:Well, if were all turning out our toolboxes.....

A) A pair of spanners for....?

Image


Adjusting the centering of brake callipers, Weinmann center-pulls? I've seen them somewhere and can't remember where.

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531colin
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby 531colin » 8 Sep 2012, 6:35am

I've only ever used them to centre sidepulls....but centrepulls....why not, if the spanner flats are there!

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531colin
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby 531colin » 8 Sep 2012, 6:40am

Brucey #2

mudguard punch?

Brucey
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Brucey » 8 Sep 2012, 7:40am

Chris Jeggo wrote:This looks like a tool I threw away not that long ago, realising it was obsolete. It is a spanner for dismantling and re-assembling Suntour freewheels, Ultra-6 and possibly Ultra-7 IIRC.


Yup, Brucey mystery tool #1 is exactly that; it is the locknut/cone spanner that fits SunTour 'New Winner' model freewheel bodies, marked 'NWN'. These were made from the late '70s (I think) up to about 1985, and could be built with standard 5, standard 6, compact 'ultra' 6 or compact 'ultra' 7 spacing. The bearings on these freewheels are adjustable on a cone and locknut system.

They were, I think, the very first freewheel which used a narrow ~5mm sprocket spacing. At one time I could buy a very wide range of sprockets from my LBS which -together with a few chainring choices- kept me amused for hours figuring out 'ideal' gear ratios for every occasion.

I have owned and used about a dozen of these freewheels and I have never had the correct tool for the bearing adjustment; I have always used a punch on the lockring. However I'm not sure that the correct tool would actually be able do the job when the lockring is very tight!

At one point I had these freewheels fitted on bikes for racing, touring, and even tandem racing. I still have a box full of them stashed away. I once (in many tens of thousands of miles) had the bearing adjuster come loose which was because I'd left a thin spacer out which allowed the overhanging #6/#7 sprocket to touch the lockring. Other than water getting in to one other (my fault!) I never had any other body problems of any kind.

I have recently come to realise that these freewheel bodies are actually immensely strong by design, having simultaneously engaging pawls which act on a reasonably large diameter inside the freewheel. Unlike others which are superficially similar, the SunTour bodies seem to be well made enough to allow both pawls to share the load from an early point in the freewheel's life. Provided the bearings are kept in adjustment, they seem very reliable.

These freewheels offered more gears, better shifting etc when they were new. Ironically it was the attraction of yet more gears, yet better shifting etc which caused many to eventually abandon their use. But for me the killer advantage to the cassette hubs with which these were replaced was that they didn't break rear axles. I may yet engineer an outrigger support bearing and return these freewheels to use; I've only been thinking about it for about 25 years....

cheers
Last edited by Brucey on 8 Sep 2012, 8:21am, edited 1 time in total.
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Brucey
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Re: think you know your bike tools?

Postby Brucey » 8 Sep 2012, 7:48am

531colin wrote:Brucey #2

mudguard punch?


Yup, it is a VAR #15 mudguard punch. There was, I believe, a similar tool made by 'ELDI' in Germany. All this because of the continental predeliction for mudguards that are fastened via a screw that goes into the underside of the brake bridge; it is certainly a good way of fastening the mudguard, but it is a PITA to fit dozens of sets without a tool of this type to make the holes with. (You could run an electric drill into the tyres quite easily..... :oops: )

Cheers
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