FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

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Brucey
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Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

Postby Brucey » 13 Sep 2020, 9:07am

greyingbeard wrote:I was wondering about how good the bottom connection is, but with USA litigation costs, surely it must work ?


'work' and 'work well' are two different things; if the manual says to inspect the connection before each use and to retighten it at intervals then the manufacturers are covered even if the system is a POS that breaks and/or regularly works loose as you ride down the road. Which it might well do, for some (strong) riders; the reason why S&S couplings are made more like Hirth couplings is that the down tube in particular sees high torsional loads in most diamond frames. The Fubi arrangement has no appreciable torsional stiffness designed into its down tube, and the 'breakaway' coupling is reliant solely on friction in the coupling in order to transfer torsion loads; this may not be entirely reliable once the coupling has seen some wear.

The whole attraction of folding bikes with full-sized wheels is that they might ride like 'normal' bikes, not like most folders. However this is (IMHO) almost completely pointless if the frame is rendered in such a way as it flexes in use in an abnormal fashion. The FUBi is clever enough, but the nub of it is that there isn't very much point in making the folding frame fold much smaller than the (large) wheels are, since this is the thing that always limits the package size when the bike is folded.

This being the case if you want the frame to ride like a normal bike (and you are not using S&S couplings) this is best achieved by keeping the main triangle in the frame intact; The Rudge (Montague) BiFrame is like this, and so are others such as any Rinko package or bikes such as Rob English's suitcase bike design. In fact Rob English's suitcase bike design ought to be one of the best; provided the BB shell clamps are made properly the chainstays shouldn't flex abnormally and the bike should ride like a 'normal' one.

A few bikes (the BiFrame being one, and the Fubi being another ) have a 'quick fold' (which might be suitable for some public transport or a car boot) as well as a more extensive fold which takes longer to accomplish. The danger in this is that the bike can fall between two (or three) stools; if either fold is compromised by the other, or by the way the bike rides, the whole thing may be a poor compromise in every respect, rather than at least being 'good in parts'.

There is no such thing as a perfect folding bike; it is a case of 'choose your poison'...?

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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speedsixdave
Posts: 750
Joined: 19 Apr 2007, 1:48pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

Postby speedsixdave » 13 Sep 2020, 10:27am

Brucey wrote:
'work' and 'work well' are two different things;

[...]

The whole attraction of folding bikes with full-sized wheels is that they might ride like 'normal' bikes, not like most folders.

[...]

There is no such thing as a perfect folding bike; it is a case of 'choose your poison'...?

cheers


I think you're bang on with this, and there's a massive difference between 'ok to ride the mile to the train station' and 'ok to ride down an Alp at 50mph (with or without camping gear)'. A Moulton (sorry!) is not a folding bike, it's a proper bike that can be packed smaller in a variety of increasingly inconvenient ways, but you can be pretty confident that it can be ridden safely at 50mph. This confidence is based on nearly 40 years of real-world experience of the join by thousands of riders, and before that experience had been gained, by trust in the serious engineering chops of its designer. I know nothing of the team behind the interesting-looking FUBi but I'd definitely want someone else to do the first few years of road testing before taking it anywhere further than the shops. I suspect the intention of the FUBi is not to be a better bicycle in all areas, like the Moulton was, butas Brucey notes, if it doesn't ride like a 'proper' bike, why not just buy a 'proper' folder? And ideally one which still folds well when it has lights and racks and mudguards attached.

In other news, to my mind the same 'FUBi' sounds a bit to close to the euphemistic acronym 'FUBAR', which is definitely not what you want your bike to be...
Big wheels good, small wheels better.
Two saddles best!

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Mick F
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Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

Postby Mick F » 13 Sep 2020, 10:42am

I mentioned Moulton, not coz it folds - coz it doesn't! - but because of the fact that spending ten minutes with it, it'll fit into a suitcase .................. including the wheels.

Other than a "proper" folding bike, it's the best thing out there for transporting. At least it rides better than a folder - or so I believe as I've never ridden a folder though have read about them.
Mick F. Cornwall

fastpedaller
Posts: 2575
Joined: 10 Jul 2014, 1:12pm
Location: Norfolk

Re: FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

Postby fastpedaller » 13 Sep 2020, 4:26pm

greyingbeard wrote:Ive no idea. Havent seen one for real. Very little is made to last these days. I think a bike ought to last many years, remainder of my lifetime anyway. You wont see me buying carbon fibre, might as well be glass fibre.


IMHO It's critical (to safety) that a bike won't fail and deposit the rider in the road without some prior warning (usually audible or a feedback of instability)

greyingbeard
Posts: 826
Joined: 24 Mar 2015, 10:41pm

Re: FUBi: second attempt at crowd-funding a foldable

Postby greyingbeard » 13 Sep 2020, 8:20pm

no one can argue with that !