rando bike vs touring bike

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Brucey
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby Brucey » 28 Jul 2014, 10:12am

Colin is right of course, but it isn't just the riding position that is different there;

your Bianchi also weighs very little, and probably has a nice whippy steel frame; a converted MTB will feel quite dead by comparison.

In addition there could be other differences in the saddle, the saddle position, the reach, the crank length.... there is a long list.

If you want to experiment, I'd suggest inverting the bars on the Bianchi, and moving the saddle slightly too (forwards on the rails and forwards tilted slightly, and then going for a few rides, using the same amount of effort that you would use when touring or whatever (which might be very different from that which you use when nipping down the shops etc).

In addition, try to set the contact points the same as on your converted MTB, and try it like that.

This will tell you If there are other (lower, more efficient) riding positions that might suit you or not, and if it is the riding position or the rest of the bike that dominates your perception of it.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Vorpal
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby Vorpal » 28 Jul 2014, 12:03pm

serbring wrote:What about touring with a cyclocross bike?

People do so, but cyclocross bikes usually have a shorter wheel base than a tourer, so will have the same sorts of problems that a MTB has.

IMO, if you are going to spend a bunch of money on a bike to go touring on, you should buy a tourer, whatever handlebars you decide you want.

If you aren't going to buy a tourer, your MTB is probably as good for touring on as any new bike you will be able to buy. Take your MTB to the local bike shop and get them to help you with your comfort on the bike.

Or see viewtopic.php?f=5&t=74985 which is full of good advice about getting the right position on the bike.

Having the saddle too far forward may be the reason you feel you should be more upright? Have a look at the thread linked.
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531colin
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby 531colin » 28 Jul 2014, 1:38pm

serbring wrote:.............You're on right, but maybe I need an upright riding position because of the frame geometry, for instance...short top tube length. Might it be the case?


Top tube length varies by maybe 2cm between a "long" and a "short" top tube for similar size bikes.
Drop bars put the brakes (and therefore the rider's hands) maybe 15cm in front of the headset, and the swept bars on that Bianchi put the rider's hands level with the headset........that's a much greater difference.

serbring
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby serbring » 9 Aug 2014, 11:30pm

I'm touring and I stopped to a bike shop to review my position. The man said the stem is shorter than it should be.infact i tend to cycle with straight upper arm and my shoulder are a bit overloaded for long riding. I will change it.

serbring
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby serbring » 12 Sep 2014, 8:07am

Hi all,

after the last trip, I decided to buy a second bike for light and fast touring and randoneering. I'll use the MTB for something harder and so I'm more up for a real roady bike. This permits me to have a light bike for touring with my gf. Regarding the bike I'm considering the following three:

Gene
http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/adv ... oix-de-fer

Wilier strada:
http://www.wilier.com/it/prodotti/int/road/strada

Trek crossrip
http://www.trekbikes.com/it/it/bikes/ro ... _limited/#

What do you think about them?

samsbike
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby samsbike » 12 Sep 2014, 4:29pm

The croix de fer has quite a following and if you search the forum, a couple of members have built one up.

The genesis croix de fer range is a bit bigger for 2015 so have a look. Also I find the genesis sizing quite small, so even though I would be a 56 in most other manufacturers, a 58 or 60 would suit me better in the genesis range.

I dont think any of them are really rando bikes, but the croix DE TOUR maybe a better alternative if you are going to be front loading.

Another option is the specialized awol (there is a thread somewhere) which also worth looking at.

Finally, the salsa vaya is also highly regarded.

serbring
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Joined: 6 Feb 2011, 11:14pm

Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby serbring » 13 Sep 2014, 12:11pm

samsbike wrote:The croix de fer has quite a following and if you search the forum, a couple of members have built one up.

The genesis croix de fer range is a bit bigger for 2015 so have a look. Also I find the genesis sizing quite small, so even though I would be a 56 in most other manufacturers, a 58 or 60 would suit me better in the genesis range.



I'll check the frame size carefully.


I dont think any of them are really rando bikes, but the croix DE TOUR maybe a better alternative if you are going to be front loading.



I have seen the tour de fer. Really nice but there is no info about the price, yet.


Another option is the specialized awol (there is a thread somewhere) which also worth looking at.


Unfortunately in Italy it is sold only the cheapest version so I'll avoid it.


Finally, the salsa vaya is also highly regarded.


Really great bikes, maybe out of the budget

NetworkMan
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Location: South Devon

Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby NetworkMan » 13 Sep 2014, 3:48pm

It’s a shame those narrow tubes have gone out of fashion. Is anyone building such frames today? I’m 65 kg, and I do like the springiness of a lightweight steel frame. I think they also teach you to pedal better.

Yes, Mercian do; you can choose 'standard' or oversize but the catch is is that it will cost you more than one of Spa's titanium offerings. There is even a 'build-it-yourself' online facility but I can't see anything about the tube gauges used; only the material.

yostumpy
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Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby yostumpy » 14 Sep 2014, 8:27am

if your interested in 'RANDO' bikes this makes good reading, you'll have to follow the story thro, but essentially its all all about how good rando bikes with 650b wheels are.

http://janheine.wordpress.com/2010/11/2 ... eur-model/

serbring
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Joined: 6 Feb 2011, 11:14pm

Re: rando bike vs touring bike

Postby serbring » 14 Sep 2014, 12:01pm

yostumpy wrote:if your interested in 'RANDO' bikes this makes good reading, you'll have to follow the story thro, but essentially its all all about how good rando bikes with 650b wheels are.

http://janheine.wordpress.com/2010/11/2 ... eur-model/


interesting blog....

I'm discovering there are bike of any kind of taste, but they're mostly sold out of EU. Like the american website of bianchi,trek or specialized have much more bike alternatives than the EU ones