English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

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Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 31 May 2020, 10:46pm

Oldjohnw wrote:What is "off of" all about. "You need to lift the kettle off of the hob".


Or 'for free'?

Bmblbzzz
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 1 Jun 2020, 10:09am

Mike Sales wrote:Superfluous suffixes.
No longer do you park, but now you park up.
One is not told to listen, but to listen up.
Nothing is swapped, it is swapped out.

All give extra information. For instance, listen up conveys 'listen and pay attention to what I'm about to tell you.' You cannot, for example, 'listen up' to music or birdsong. Similarly, swap out says that one component is being replaced with an equivalent in a system. You can swap out a worn cassette for a new one, you cannot swap out a book you've read for one your mate.

Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 1 Jun 2020, 4:56pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:Superfluous suffixes.
No longer do you park, but now you park up.
One is not told to listen, but to listen up.
Nothing is swapped, it is swapped out.

All give extra information. For instance, listen up conveys 'listen and pay attention to what I'm about to tell you.' You cannot, for example, 'listen up' to music or birdsong. Similarly, swap out says that one component is being replaced with an equivalent in a system. You can swap out a worn cassette for a new one, you cannot swap out a book you've read for one your mate.


I do not think your examples prove your point.

Bmblbzzz
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 1 Jun 2020, 6:33pm

"I swapped out the old cassette" means "I replaced the old cassette (with a new one)".
"I swapped the old cassette" could mean the same or could mean "I gave it to someone, who gave me (something else) in exchange".

Here are examples from Cambridge Dic:
Would you mind swapping those plates over?

Swap over clearly has the specific meaning of "swap positions".
While in this example:
I'll swap you my chocolate bar for your peanuts.

"For" means exchanging one item for a different item.

"Swap out" is just an additional specific sub-meaning of "swap". It just happens to have entered use more recently.

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kylecycler
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby kylecycler » 1 Jun 2020, 6:51pm

It does my head in to see swap spelled swop - it just looks wrong - but apparently it's an 'acceptable variant'. :(

https://english.stackexchange.com/quest ... nt-of-swap

Cyril Haearn
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Cyril Haearn » 1 Jun 2020, 6:59pm

Use 'exchange' instead :wink:
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Bmblbzzz
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 1 Jun 2020, 9:32pm

Swap would be my usual spelling, but I do reckon Multi-Coloured Swap Shop missed a trick there.

In other news, Swap and Mart? :wink:

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Mick F
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 2 Jun 2020, 3:19pm

The ones that always rile me, are the weather forecasters and their use of English.

One example ..............

We were told this morning, that, "Tomorrow will be cooler".
How can it be cooler if it wasn't cool to start with?
It's damed hot today, like it has been for most of May.

"Tomorrow won't be hot" ....or "Tomorrow will be less hot" ....... or "Tomorrow will be cool".

It cannot be cooler! :shock:
Mick F. Cornwall