English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Separate forum to permit easy exclusion when searching for serious information !
AJ101
Posts: 83
Joined: 30 Oct 2015, 3:45pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby AJ101 » 27 Nov 2015, 11:48pm

"Have you cake and eat it"

Surely they mean "Eat your cake and have it"?

Also
PULLED PORK

why!?!?

AlaninWales
Posts: 1551
Joined: 26 Oct 2012, 1:47pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby AlaninWales » 28 Nov 2015, 12:03am

AJ101 wrote:"Have you cake and eat it"

Surely they mean "Eat your cake and have it"?

Also
PULLED PORK

why!?!?

Pulled to make it long pork? :lol:

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 47421
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 28 Nov 2015, 9:01am

Two times, instead of twice.
Mick F. Cornwall

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 9216
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby 661-Pete » 28 Nov 2015, 9:36am

AJ101 wrote:Also
PULLED PORK

why!?!?
Now now! This is not the Bullingdon club...
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2972
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 29 Nov 2015, 9:00pm

Mick F wrote:Two times, instead of twice.

Three times, instead of thrice?
Four times, instead of... ?

User avatar
horizon
Posts: 9885
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby horizon » 29 Nov 2015, 9:59pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:
Mick F wrote:Two times, instead of twice.

Three times, instead of thrice?
Four times, instead of... ?


No, it's not logic, it's just style. American adults say two times. UK children say two times. UK adults say twice - it's just convention (and sometimes thrice). If you're an English adult and don't mind sounding like a four year old then use "two times". Simple really. What grates isn't the logic but the feeling that our culture is being overrun by fairly shallow commercial American culture - that's why it's significant - straws in the wind and all that. Whether that really matters (or should bother anyone) is a different discussion.
The experience of travel is something that you have to pay for but can never buy. Ho Ri Zon Chinese philosopher

User avatar
horizon
Posts: 9885
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby horizon » 29 Nov 2015, 10:03pm

And while I'm on this thread (love it really . . . :D )

Dogs' names!

Why does the Guardian or Radio 4 need to tell us the name of someone's dog or even if they have one. But the name ...?

But then they've told us the names of their children (and the significance of their names is...?).

My goodness, it can't get much worse.
Last edited by horizon on 30 Nov 2015, 10:36am, edited 1 time in total.
The experience of travel is something that you have to pay for but can never buy. Ho Ri Zon Chinese philosopher

User avatar
Goosey
Posts: 236
Joined: 14 Mar 2007, 10:49am
Location: SW France
Contact:

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Goosey » 30 Nov 2015, 9:14am

'Simples'. I hate that :(

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2972
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 30 Nov 2015, 10:58am

"Thrice" is an extremely common word in Indian English, used when something happens three times, in arithmetic and in situations where English English would more likely use "triple", eg "Thrice Tour de France winner Greg Lemond".

User avatar
horizon
Posts: 9885
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby horizon » 30 Nov 2015, 2:37pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:"Thrice" is an extremely common word in Indian English, used when something happens three times, in arithmetic and in situations where English English would more likely use "triple", eg "Thrice Tour de France winner Greg Lemond".


Thrice is great but it's not often used - it's an interesting quirk of the language. But if the TV viewing public cannot cope with twice, that's going to disappear as well (there's at least one advert that uses two times but I can't remember which it is). Language needs to change but this loss of twice is simply ignorant wipe-out.
The experience of travel is something that you have to pay for but can never buy. Ho Ri Zon Chinese philosopher

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2972
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 30 Nov 2015, 4:32pm

I don't know the ad you're referring to, but adverts in general use language for effect. I don't think it can be taken as a sign that people can no longer understand a particular word.

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 47421
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 1 Dec 2015, 7:21am

horizon wrote: .......... If you're an English adult and don't mind sounding like a four year old then use "two times" ..........
Excellently put!
Mick F. Cornwall

grani
Posts: 227
Joined: 25 Mar 2014, 8:10am

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby grani » 1 Dec 2015, 8:31am

AJ101 wrote:PULLED PORK

why!?!?




Am I missing something? In order to make pulled pork you have to slow cook it and then pull it apart with forks.

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 9216
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby 661-Pete » 1 Dec 2015, 9:33am

horizon wrote:Thrice is great but it's not often used - it's an interesting quirk of the language.

Lewis Carroll wrote:"Just the place for a Snark! I have said it twice:
That alone should encourage the crew.
Just the place for a Snark! I have said it thrice:
What I tell you three times is true."
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2972
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 1 Dec 2015, 10:03am

Wonderful example! :D