English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

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reohn2
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Re: English Language - what

Postby reohn2 » 5 Apr 2018, 8:07pm

Mike Sales wrote:
reohn2 wrote:Gear changing requires presicion,OTOH with language,as long as I understand what's being conveyed I couldn't give a monkey's :mrgreen:


There's the problem. When language is used without precision it can lead to ambiguity or misunderstanding.
Metaphor and simile when fresh are illuminating and enlivening. When they get stale and worn they are blunt and boring.

You gave me a towelling there Mike.......
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I cycle therefore I am.

Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what

Postby Mike Sales » 5 Apr 2018, 8:10pm

reohn2 wrote:You gave me a towelling there Mike.......


Now there is a nice,fresh metaphor.

Bmblbzzz
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Re: English Language - what

Postby Bmblbzzz » 5 Apr 2018, 10:10pm

Mike Sales wrote:
reohn2 wrote:You gave me a towelling there Mike.......


Now there is a nice,fresh metaphor.

Whatever you have to say, come out and say it. Stop flannelling!

Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what

Postby Mike Sales » 5 Apr 2018, 10:14pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
reohn2 wrote:You gave me a towelling there Mike.......


Now there is a nice,fresh metaphor.

Whatever you have to say, come out and say it. Stop flannelling!


Again, a vigorous use of language which provokes a smile. Thanks.

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horizon
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby horizon » 12 Apr 2018, 8:45pm

Have we covered the dropping of country adjectives:

Hundreds of jobs to go as 2 Sisters plans Scotland factory shutdown


(from the Guardian)
Bikes belong on trains: two spaces per carriage would meet most needs.

brynpoeth
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 13 Apr 2018, 2:47am

horizon wrote:Have we covered the dropping of country adjectives:

Hundreds of jobs to go as 2 Sisters plans Scotland factory shutdown


(from the Guardian)

A factory where Scotlands are made?
Must have been a lot of work to make New Caledonia and Nova Scotia, how did one get export permits?
Where was New South Wales manufactured?
Cycling? Of course, but it is far better on a Gillott.. Alternative facts welcome

Bmblbzzz
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 13 Apr 2018, 11:53am

Headlines do have their own grammar in most languages.

profpointy
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Re: English Language - what

Postby profpointy » 13 Apr 2018, 1:43pm

Mike Sales wrote:
reohn2 wrote:Gear changing requires presicion,OTOH with language,as long as I understand what's being conveyed I couldn't give a monkey's :mrgreen:


There's the problem. When language is used without precision it can lead to ambiguity or misunderstanding.
Metaphor and simile when fresh are illuminating and enlivening. When they get stale and worn they are blunt and boring.


Don't need precision if the meaning's obvious:

"I helped my Uncle jack off his horse"

profpointy
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby profpointy » 13 Apr 2018, 1:45pm

brynpoeth wrote:So I rather like the new (?) habit of starting a sentence with *so*


"So, the Spear-Danes in days gone by, led by their Kings, who had courage and greatness"

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Graham
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Graham » 13 Apr 2018, 2:03pm

I have just been hearing * Peter White, presenting something-or-other on Radio4.

He starts nearly EVERY sentence with "So. . . . . . "

* hearing - as in not listening, on the grounds that anyone suffering from the "so-affliction" has nothing of value to communicate.

Vorpal
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Vorpal » 13 Apr 2018, 2:50pm

I used to work with someone who finished practically every sentence with 'and so on...' Starting with 'so' would be much less iritating.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

brynpoeth
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 13 Apr 2018, 6:54pm

Graham wrote:I have just been hearing * Peter White, presenting something-or-other on Radio4.

He starts nearly EVERY sentence with "So. . . . . . "

* hearing - as in not listening, on the grounds that anyone suffering from the "so-affliction" has nothing of value to communicate.

I thought Peter White was good, haven't heard him for a while
Why did you not hit the off switch? :?

Positive thread alert, just had a couple of hours presentation at work, the speaker was good, she did not use ums and ers
I bothered to congratulate her, although I had already done a good deed earlier, that makes two today at least, when will I get my reward? :wink:
Cycling? Of course, but it is far better on a Gillott.. Alternative facts welcome

Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 14 Apr 2018, 7:27pm

Not all changes in the language are improvements.
Some seem to come from a need to disguise the unpleasant.
I see "pass" for "die" as mealy mouthed. My mother died recently and I made sure to say "she died".
An Americanism I dislike is "ass" for "buttock". We are loosing a good old Anglo-saxon word. Earwig (arsewiggler) and wheatear (whitearse) both derive from it.
I think that problems have all changed into issues from a desire to soften the sense.

Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 14 Apr 2018, 7:40pm

Mike Sales wrote:Not all changes in the language are improvements.
Some seem to come from a need to disguise the unpleasant.
I see "pass" for "die" as mealy mouthed. My mother died recently and I made sure to say "she died".
An Americanism I dislike is "ass" for "bottom". We are loosing a good old Anglo-saxon word. Earwig (arsewiggler) and wheatear (whitearse) both derive from it.
I think that problems have all changed into issues from a desire to soften the sense.


Edit. I see that the robot censor objected to my use of the good old Anglo-saxon. Is it a merkin? I did not write bottom, but the word I did write was acceptable as part of two other words.

Edit again. I'm watching Alice Roberts on the box talking about Viking "poo". This seems to be the TV acceptable word. I wonder if "turd" or "stool" will survive our unquestionable electric nanny?
They did. It is a whimsical robot.
I doubt sh1t would, spelt correctly.

brynpoeth
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 14 Apr 2018, 8:39pm

Mike Sales wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:Not all changes in the language are improvements.
Some seem to come from a need to disguise the unpleasant.
I see "pass" for "die" as mealy mouthed. My mother died recently and I made sure to say "she died".
An Americanism I dislike is "ass" for "bottom". We are loosing a good old Anglo-saxon word. Earwig (arsewiggler) and wheatear (whitearse) both derive from it.
I think that problems have all changed into issues from a desire to soften the sense.


Edit. I see that the robot censor objected to my use of the good old Anglo-saxon. Is it a merkin? I did not write bottom, but the word I did write was acceptable as part of two other words.

Edit again. I'm watching Alice Roberts on the box talking about Viking "poo". This seems to be the TV acceptable word. I wonder if "turd" or "stool" will survive our unquestionable electric nanny?
They did. It is a whimsical robot.
I doubt sh1t would, spelt correctly.

Usually there are three or more different words for any part of the body or bodily functions, euphemisms are fun, toilet costs 50c now, not a penny, but what are the wee wee frees in Scotland, is that a veiled reference to free toilets?
I use p******e, for tyres, obvious reasons :!:

Did Uncle jack win the grand national?
Cycling? Of course, but it is far better on a Gillott.. Alternative facts welcome