English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Separate forum to permit easy exclusion when searching for serious information !
brynpoeth
Posts: 10521
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 25 Jan 2019, 3:57am

Caesar sic in omnibus, Brutus ate a rat :?
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2712
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 25 Jan 2019, 9:02am

Omnibus survived at least into the 80s on signs and as part of company names. This used to slightly confuse me as where I grew up, the bus services were run by "Bristol Omnibus", which I think might have been part of the National Express group, although we lived some 30 miles from Bristol - that part I could accept, but the confusing thing was that the bus itself had "Bristol" written on it. As in:
ImageBristol bus logo by Antony Theobald, on Flickr

(not my photo)

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2712
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 25 Jan 2019, 9:04am

But what I intended to say before I distracted myself with old logos is that the word omnibus survives in certain contexts: specific names, phrases such the man on the Clapham omnibus, and of course omnibus edition, but is certainly not in use as daily word for a mode of transport.

User avatar
Audax67
Posts: 4399
Joined: 25 Aug 2011, 9:02am
Location: Alsace, France
Contact:

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 25 Jan 2019, 9:24am

Mick F wrote::lol: :lol: :lol:

The noun BUS is pluralised by me as wot I thort it shud bee.
Bus pluralised is buses as per the dictionaries, but "buses" would be pronounced bue-sez

Plural of bus should be buzz-ezz as in busses.


In the 1970's southern US, busing was the practice of transporting kids of one race to schools in areas dominated by another, in hopes of desegregation. I could never read it without pronouncing it mentally as abusing without the A.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 16932
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Vorpal » 25 Jan 2019, 2:22pm

Audax67 wrote:
Mick F wrote::lol: :lol: :lol:

The noun BUS is pluralised by me as wot I thort it shud bee.
Bus pluralised is buses as per the dictionaries, but "buses" would be pronounced bue-sez

Plural of bus should be buzz-ezz as in busses.


In the 1970's southern US, busing was the practice of transporting kids of one race to schools in areas dominated by another, in hopes of desegregation. I could never read it without pronouncing it mentally as abusing without the A.

They still do it. Not just in the south, but any place where segregation remains an issue. And it still has most of the issues it had in the 70s. Black kids are bused to schools in white neighborhoods; seldom the other way around.

The system where I went to school had a different (and IMO, much more successful approach). Specialist schools were put in a neighborhood where the majority of residents were black and ethnic minority. The specialist school offered advanced studies, creative and performing arts, and vocational education at a level similar to that of a private school. There were established criteria for attending; testing for the academic & vocational tracks, auditions for the creative and performing arts. It achieved integration and gave a vulnerable population an opportunity for a high level of educational attainment. I didn't realise how rare it was until I went to university and had the chance to tlak to other people about their educational background.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

Mike Sales
Posts: 2843
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 25 Jan 2019, 2:36pm

brynpoeth wrote:Caesar sic in omnibus, Brutus ate a rat :?



Brutus adsum iam forte, Caesar aderat, Caesar sic in omnibus, Brutus sic inat.

Mike Sales
Posts: 2843
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 25 Jan 2019, 2:39pm

"Yay"

brynpoeth
Posts: 10521
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 25 Jan 2019, 3:21pm

I am quite relaxed about grammar, I do not get excited about apostrophes and the like

Can still be a bit confusing with buses marked 'Corporation of Bristol', a stranger might think the omnibus would take them to Bristol

Locomotive names were fun too, the destination board on the front might display the destination but steam engines had some queer names, Bryngwyn Hall for example
Unfortunately 'Clun Castle' has not been to Clun. Yet :wink:
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 45785
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 25 Jan 2019, 3:38pm

brynpoeth wrote:I am quite relaxed about grammar, I do not get excited about apostrophes and the like.
Sent to me by one of our daughters. She's an English teacher at a senior school.
https://www.weareteachers.com/grammar-p ... e=facebook
Mick F. Cornwall

thirdcrank
Posts: 28648
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby thirdcrank » 29 Jan 2019, 9:05am

"At this time" seems to be displacing "now" or to reinforce an easily understood present tense which would be ok on its own.

User avatar
Ray
Posts: 908
Joined: 27 Jan 2007, 11:10am
Location: West Yorkshire

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Ray » 29 Jan 2019, 9:42am

thirdcrank wrote:"At this time" seems to be displacing "now" or to reinforce an easily understood present tense which would be ok on its own.


Yes, and whereas we once simply said "every day" or "daily", we now hear "on a daily basis".

And don't start me on tautologies!
Ray
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt - Bertrand Russell

User avatar
Goosey
Posts: 236
Joined: 14 Mar 2007, 10:49am
Location: SW France
Contact:

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Goosey » 29 Jan 2019, 3:40pm

"Reaching out to" when they mean contact :roll:

User avatar
Audax67
Posts: 4399
Joined: 25 Aug 2011, 9:02am
Location: Alsace, France
Contact:

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 1 Feb 2019, 10:21am

Goosey wrote:"Reaching out to" when they mean contact :roll:


Especially when thrust into the mouth of an actor playing a role set in the 18th century.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

reohn2
Posts: 35222
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby reohn2 » 1 Feb 2019, 10:55am

What I find annoying is someone saing "drawring" when it's "drawing".
We had it all through the TV and radio news last night when they were reporting on the Leonardo da Vinchi exibitions up and down the country.
-----------------------------------------------------------
I cycle therefore I am.

User avatar
Audax67
Posts: 4399
Joined: 25 Aug 2011, 9:02am
Location: Alsace, France
Contact:

Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 1 Feb 2019, 1:49pm

reohn2 wrote:What I find annoying is someone saing "drawring" when it's "drawing".
We had it all through the TV and radio news last night when they were reporting on the Leonardo da Vinchi exibitions up and down the country.


There are lots of explanations for this on line but they're all full of big words such as epenthetic* - and most of them explain pronunciation in terms of their own dialect, which is usually not mine.

* don't worry, I looked it up.
Have we got time for another cuppa?