English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

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Audax67
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 22 May 2019, 10:53am

Squozen is apparently venerable:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0

And that's in British English. US English is a bit different:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0
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kylecycler
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby kylecycler » 22 May 2019, 7:23pm

Audax67 wrote:Squozen is apparently venerable:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0

And that's in British English. US English is a bit different:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0

That's a great resource - never seen it before. It's a shame the word fell into disuse although it seems to be rallying, especially over there.

I have Chrome set to UK English, the default being US English. I could try setting it back to see what difference it makes to the spellcheck but it was such a faff altering it before that I'd rather not as I've forgotten how I did it.

It's funny how what sounds 'right', though, is often just what we're used to, and vice versa - to pick up on Bmblbzzz's perfectly logical and justifiable observation re. 'squozen' and 'frozen'...

"After bucking a severe headwind most of the way in temperatures below zero, the group ended the run absolutely freezed..." :) It sounds wrong because it is, but if it wasn't, maybe it wouldn't.

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 25 May 2019, 4:47pm

People using us when it should be we. Nobody (well, Englísh-speakers in their right mind, that is) would say "what us have to do is..." but they would happily say "what us cyclists have to do is...". Do they think it sounds Tory, or what? Inverted grammatical snobbery?

It's utterly wrong.
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 25 May 2019, 4:55pm

kylecycler wrote:
Audax67 wrote:Squozen is apparently venerable:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0

And that's in British English. US English is a bit different:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... en%3B%2Cc0

That's a great resource - never seen it before. It's a shame the word fell into disuse although it seems to be rallying, especially over there.

I have Chrome set to UK English, the default being US English. I could try setting it back to see what difference it makes to the spellcheck but it was such a faff altering it before that I'd rather not as I've forgotten how I did it.

It's funny how what sounds 'right', though, is often just what we're used to, and vice versa - to pick up on Bmblbzzz's perfectly logical and justifiable observation re. 'squozen' and 'frozen'...

"After bucking a severe headwind most of the way in temperatures below zero, the group ended the run absolutely freezed..." :) It sounds wrong because it is, but if it wasn't, maybe it wouldn't.


Aye, but logic and language don't mix well. I used to think that since the French for power was pouvoir the French for shower would be shouvoir. Well, not really but you get the idea.

Funnily enough, the French for shower is douche, and calling some person or persons an horrible shower isn't that far from calling them douches.
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Mike Sales
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mike Sales » 25 May 2019, 4:56pm

"Committed"

As in, "This government is committed to increasing cycling."
or "The Acme Company is committed to cutting our use of plastics."

Meaning, "we have no real plan to do this, but we want to sound good."

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby brynpoeth » 25 May 2019, 8:27pm

Fortunately the EU is -committed- to phasing out Palm oil by 2030, Plus One!
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 27 May 2019, 9:33am

Mike Sales wrote:"Committed"

As in, "This government is committed to increasing cycling."
or "The Acme Company is committed to cutting our use of plastics."

Meaning, "we have no real plan to do this, but we want to sound good."


"The leaders of this government have been committed" - deafening cheers erupt from JOG to LE.
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 28 May 2019, 4:17pm

Is a word spelled or spelt as the past tense?

The verb:

I spell
You spell
He spells
She spells
They spell

I spelt
You spelt
We spelt
We have spelt

Correct?
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Yvonned
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Yvonned » 29 May 2019, 9:34am

Yes Mick, that’s right as far as I’m aware. I do know that spelled is an acceptable alternative.

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Bmblbzzz » 29 May 2019, 10:16am

I'd say spelled is the more common spelling. Ngrams agrees:
https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... lt%3B%2Cc0

Of course it's impossible to know how many of those "spelts" refer to spelling and how many to cereal, but in any case, both are correct.

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby DaveReading » 29 May 2019, 10:57am

Yvonned wrote:Yes Mick, that’s right as far as I’m aware. I do know that spelled is an acceptable alternative.

A number of English verbs have alternative past participles, both equally correct. "Dreamed" and "dreamt" is another example.

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Audax67 » 29 May 2019, 1:13pm

DaveReading wrote:
Yvonned wrote:Yes Mick, that’s right as far as I’m aware. I do know that spelled is an acceptable alternative.

A number of English verbs have alternative past participles, both equally correct. "Dreamed" and "dreamt" is another example.


There's probably a regional bias, each form being inherited from a different dialect. Remember that test in the NYT a month or two back? It was entitled British/Irish but it covers pretty well the whole UK + Ireland.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... -quiz.html
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby Mick F » 29 May 2019, 3:00pm

DaveReading wrote:A number of English verbs have alternative past participles, both equally correct. "Dreamed" and "dreamt" is another example.
I see Dreamed and Dreamt as having different meanings.

Last night I dreamed ............................ and I dreamt that I was eating peppermints, and when I awoke, all the buttons were gone from my pyjamas. :wink:
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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby thirdcrank » 29 May 2019, 3:38pm

I'd recommend the fourth edition of Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage. A steal at £17.40 from Amazon.
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More an irritation than doing my head in is the use of circumlocutions to say they packaging is only suitable for landfill. eg Not currently recycled. It's bad enough when PLC's do this but the the Co-op says "Not yet recycled" and that's an ethical organisation.

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Re: English Language - what "Does your head in" ??

Postby cotterpins » 2 Jul 2019, 10:15pm

"As it 'Appens,' . . . As wot happens?

"What's the strength!" . . . of what?

Oiy, trunk out! . . . Why not say don't be nosy?