Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Stevek76
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Joined: 28 Jul 2015, 11:23am

Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Stevek76 »

Ealing has followed through with its junk science approach of treating consultations with uncontrolled responses as referendums and bottled it on almost all of them:

https://www.ealing.gov.uk/news/article/ ... _residents

'Fully committed' though!
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ratherbeintobago
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Joined: 5 Dec 2010, 6:31pm

Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ratherbeintobago »

I wonder if they’ve been told to think hard before doing anything?
Stevek76
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Stevek76 »

They were on the dft's naughty list (i.e. funding withheld pending further discussions) if that's what you're meaning?

I doubt that this approach will get them off the hook, the last letter on active travel funding was quite clear on the need to weigh evidence over (perceived) consensus and stresses the need to robustly ascertain public opinion with, eg, professional polling methods.
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ratherbeintobago
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ratherbeintobago »

If they lose all their transport funding, they’ll only have themselves to blame…

Edit: it sounds like they’re delaying removal of the LTNs because they’re afraid of that very thing.
Stevek76
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Joined: 28 Jul 2015, 11:23am

Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Stevek76 »

Well Ealing did eventually follow through, voting in cabinet the other night to remove most of them. They're attempting to justify it on the basis that they did not improve air quality despite that not being a key purpose of them and that other metrics monitored were positive.

I'm not even sure how they can judge air quality at all. Official figures are an annual average and normally take a couple of months at least to produce after that year as various checks & normalisations have to be done. Further, local air pollution can be heavily influenced by that year's weather conditions making single year comparisons unreliable.

I think they're being rather optimistic if they think this weak excuse is going to fly with the dft/tfl
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ratherbeintobago
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ratherbeintobago »

Stevek76 wrote: 24 Sep 2021, 7:27pmI think they're being rather optimistic if they think this weak excuse is going to fly with the dft/tfl
Aye, though it’ll be interesting to see how much teeth the DfT threats actually have.
ChrisButch
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ChrisButch »

For as long as Shapps has Andrew Gilligan breathing down his neck.
ratherbeintobago
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ratherbeintobago »

ChrisButch wrote: 25 Sep 2021, 2:59pm For as long as Shapps has Andrew Gilligan breathing down his neck.
How do you mean?
ChrisButch
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ChrisButch »

I mean that the DfT's current enthusiasm for active travel will last only as long as it's driven from the top. Shapps is making the right noises, but I doubt his heart's in it. But as long as Gilligan remains as the enforcer, there's reason for optimism.
Jdsk
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Jdsk »

"Birmingham has announced what it calls a “transformative” transport plan that will see the car-centric city becoming a super-sized low-traffic neighbourhood.":
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/202 ... ghbourhood

Jonathan
ratherbeintobago
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by ratherbeintobago »

Jdsk wrote: 4 Oct 2021, 6:27pm "Birmingham has announced what it calls a “transformative” transport plan that will see the car-centric city becoming a super-sized low-traffic neighbourhood.":
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/202 ... ghbourhood

Jonathan
This looks amazing. Let’s hope it’s a success so other cities come under pressure to follow suit…
Stevek76
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Stevek76 »

Good to see they've followed through. Sort of had some faith that they would as Birmingham have actually been fairly decent with facing down motoring opposition of late. Where other councils (Bristol, Manchester etc) have flapped about trying to wriggle out of a class D CAZ (ie charging private cars), Birmingham just accepted and got on with it spending time on dealing with the consequences.
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Pete Owens
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods?

Post by Pete Owens »

I think it is due to Birmingham being one of the cities that went most aggressively pro car in the 1970s that they were one of the first places to see the futility of that approach. They have been taking out a lot of the auto-centric infrastructure from the city centre for quite a long time now.
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